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Configuring CCF to Use HTTPS (SSL) on IIS 6.0

The operation of CCF depends on interaction with Web services. A typical CCF environment is built on servers, clients, and networks, all of which are secure. You can use SSL to add another level of security to the Web sites.

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To use SSL successfully, the solutions integrator (SI) must obtain a valid server certificate signed by a trusted root authority.

If obtaining a certificate is not feasible, you can use a certificate self-test tool called selfssl.exe. This tool is part of the IIS 6.0 Resource Kit available from Microsoft. You can use this tool to generate a self-signed, trusted certificate. The tool has its own command line.

To start the self-test tool

  1. On the Start menu, click All Programs, and then click IIS Resources.
  2. Type the following:

selfssl /T /N:CN=CCFIIS /k:2048 /v:9999 /s:3 /p: 8443

Where:

  • /T – adds the self-signed certificate to the Trusted Certificates list. This tells the local browser to trust the self-signed certificate
  • /N:CN<IisServer>= – specifies the common name of the certificate. If you do not specify a common name, then the tool uses the computer name. In the example, the machine name is CCFIIS; however, yours should be the machine name for your IIS server.
  • /K:key size – specifies the key length. The default is 1024.
  • /V: – specifies the number of days that the certificate will be valid. The default is 7.
  • /S:site id – specifies the ID of the site. The default is 1.
  • /P:port – specifies the SSL port. The default is 443.
  • /Q – specifies quiet mode. If you specify quiet mode, you will not be prompted when SSL settings are overwritten.
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For security reasons, do not use of self-signed certificates for any purpose other than testing or development.


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