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View Effective Permissions

Applies to: Exchange Server 2010

Topic Last Modified: 2009-10-20

Permissions in Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 are granted using management roles that are assigned to management role groups, management role assignment policies, universal security groups (USGs), or directly to users. Users are granted the permissions if they're members of the role groups or USGs, or are assigned role assignment policies.

Most permissions are granted based on role group membership or the assignment of assignment policies to end users. Although using role groups and assignment policies makes it easy to grant permissions to large numbers of users, you may not be aware of who is a member of a role group, or who has been assigned an assignment policy. This is where the GetEffectiveUsers switch on the Get-ManagementRoleAssignment cmdlet is useful. It shows you what users are granted the permissions given by a management role through the role groups, assignment policies, and USGs that are assigned to them.

The GetEffectiveUsers switch is used with the Get-ManagementRoleAssignment cmdlet when the Role parameter is used. By specifying this switch with a particular role, the Get-ManagementRoleAssignment cmdlet examines all of the role assignees assigned to the role, such as role groups, assignment policies, and USGs, and lists the members of each.

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The GetEffectiveUser switch doesn't list users that are members of a linked foreign role group. Instead of a list of users, if a linked role group is found, All Linked Group Members is displayed. For more information about permissions in multiple forests, see Understanding Multiple-Forest Permissions.

For more information about management roles, role groups, and assignment policies, see Understanding Role Based Access Control.

For more information about management role assignments, see Understanding Management Role Assignments.

Looking for other management tasks related to managing permissions? Check out Managing Permissions.

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You can't use the EMC to list all effective users.

To list all of the users that are granted the permissions provided by a management role, use the following syntax.

Get-ManagementRoleAssignment -Role <role name> -GetEffectiveUsers

This example lists all the users that are granted permissions provided by the Mail Recipients role.

Get-ManagementRoleAssignment -Role "Mail Recipients" -GetEffectiveUsers

If you want to change what properties are returned in the list or export the list to a comma-separated value (CSV) file, see Customize output and display it later in this topic.

For detailed syntax and parameter information, see Get-ManagementRoleAssignment.

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You can't use the EMC to find a specific user on a role.

To find a specific user that's been granted permissions by a management role, you must use the Get-ManagementRoleAssignment cmdlet to retrieve a list of all effective users, and then pipe the output of the cmdlet to the Where cmdlet. The Where cmdlet filters the output and returns only the user you specified. Use the following syntax.

Get-ManagementRoleAssignment -Role <role name> -GetEffectiveUsers | Where { $_.EffectiveUserName -Eq "<name of user>" }

This example finds the user David Strome on the Journaling role.

Get-ManagementRoleAssignment -Role Journaling -GetEffectiveUsers | Where { $_.EffectiveUserName -Eq "David Strome" }

If you want to change what properties are returned in the list or export the list to a CSV file, see Customize output and display it later in this topic.

For detailed syntax and parameter information, see Get-ManagementRoleAssignment.

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You can't use the EMC to find a specific user on all roles.

To know every role that a user receives permissions from, you must use the Get-ManagementRoleAssignment cmdlet to retrieve all effective users on all management roles and then pipe the output of the cmdlet to the Where cmdlet. The Where cmdlet filters the output and returns only the role assignments that grant the user permissions.

Get-ManagementRoleAssignment -GetEffectiveUsers | Where { $_.EffectiveUserName -Eq "<name of user>" }

This example finds all the role assignments that grant permissions to the user Kim Akers.

Get-ManagementRoleAssignment -GetEffectiveUsers | Where { $_.EffectiveUserName -Eq "Kim Akers" }

If you want to change what properties are returned in the list or export the list to a CSV file, see Customize output and display it later in this topic.

For detailed syntax and parameter information, see Get-ManagementRoleAssignment.

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You can't use the EMC to customize output and display it.

The default output of the Get-ManagementRoleAssignment cmdlet might not have the information you want. The output of the cmdlet contains many more properties that you can access. The following are some of the properties that could be useful:

  • EffectiveUserName   This is the name of the user.
  • Role   This indicates the role that's granting the permissions.
  • RoleAssigneeName   This is the role group, assignment policy, or USG that's assigned to the role and contains the user in the EffectiveUserName property.
  • RoleAssigneeType   This indicates whether the role assignment is to a role group, assignment policy, USG, or user.
  • AssignmentMethod   This indicates whether the assignment between the role and the role assignee is direct or indirect.
  • CustomRecipientWriteScope   This indicates the custom recipient write scope, if any, that was applied to the role assignment when it was created. The scope specified in this property overrides the implicit recipient write scope specified in the RecipientWriteScope property.
  • CustomConfigWriteScope   This indicates the custom configuration write scope, if any, that was applied to the role assignment when it was created. The scope specified in this property overrides the implicit configuration write scope specified in the ConfigWriteScope property.
  • RecipientReadScope   This indicates the implicit recipient read scope that's applied to the role.
  • RecipientWriteScope   This indicates the implicit recipient write scope that's applied to the role.
  • ConfigReadScope   This indicates the implicit configuration read scope that's applied to the role.
  • ConfigWriteScope   This indicates the implicit configuration write scope that's applied to the role.

To select the properties you want to display in your list, you use nearly the same commands that are used in the Use the Shell to list all effective users, Use the Shell to find a specific user on a role, and Use the Shell to find a specific user on all roles sections. The difference is that you pipe the results of those commands to the Format-Table or Select-Object cmdlets. The Format-Table cmdlet is useful to output the list of results to your screen. The Select-Object cmdlet is useful to output the list of your results to a CSV file.

Both cmdlets let you specify the properties you want to see and in the order you want to see them. The Format-Table cmdlet gives you more options when you list results to a screen while Select-Object doesn't modify the output in any way, which is useful when piping the list to a CSV file.

For more information about the Format-Table and Select-Object cmdlets, see Working with Command Output.

First, choose the information you want to see and find the associated command from one of the following procedures:

Then, choose the properties you want to see in your list. Finally, use the following syntax to view the list.

<command to retrieve list > | Format-Table <property 1>, <property 2>, <property ...>

This example finds the user David Strome on all roles, and displays the EffectiveUserName, Role, CustomRecipientWriteScope, and CustomConfigWriteScope properties.

Get-ManagementRoleAssignment -GetEffectiveUsers | Where { $_.EffectiveUserName -Eq "David Strome" } | Format-Table EffectiveUserName, Role, CustomRecipientWriteScope, CustomConfigWriteScope

For detailed syntax and parameter information, see Get-ManagementRoleAssignment.

To export a list to a CSV file, you need to pipe the results of the Get-ManagementRoleAssignment command from the appropriate procedure listed previously to the Select-Object cmdlet. The output of the Select-Object cmdlet is then piped to the Export-CSV cmdlet, which saves the CSV output to a file name you specify.

First, choose the information you want to see and find the associated command from one of the following procedures:

Then, choose the properties you want to see in your list. Finally, use the following syntax to export the list to a CSV file.

<command to retrieve list > | Select-Object <property 1>, <property 2>, <property ...> | Export-CSV <filename>

This example finds the user David Strome on all roles, and displays the EffectiveUserName, Role, CustomRecipientWriteScope, and CustomConfigWriteScope properties.

Get-ManagementRoleAssignment -GetEffectiveUsers | Where { $_.EffectiveUserName -Eq "David Strome" } | Select-Object EffectiveUserName, Role, CustomRecipientWriteScope, CustomConfigWriteScope | Export-CSV c:\output.csv

You can now view the CSV file in a viewer of your choice.

For detailed syntax and parameter information, see Get-ManagementRoleAssignment.

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