Export (0) Print
Expand All

Data providers used for Analysis Services connections

Analysis Services provides three data providers for server and data access. All applications connecting to Analysis Services do so using one of these providers. Two of the providers, ADOMD.NET and Analysis Services Management Objects (AMO), are managed data providers. The Analysis Services OLE DB provider (MSOLAP DLL) is a native data provider.

In organizations that run multiple versions of Analysis Services, you might need to install more recent versions of the data providers on user workstations connecting to Analysis Services data. Connections to newer versions of Analysis Services require data providers from the same major release. For example, to connect to SQL Server 2014 Analysis Services (SSAS), each workstation must have a data provider from the 2014 release. Although Excel installs the data providers it needs to connect, that provider can be out of date relative to the Analysis Services instances you are using.

This topic contains the following section:

Determine server version

Determine the version of the Analysis Services data providers on a workstation

Where to get newer version data providers

MSOLAP native OLE DB data provider

ADOMD.NET

AMO

Note Note

Both of the managed data providers, AMO and ADOMD.NET, are wrappers to the native OLE DB provider, which means that both use MSOLAP when connecting to a server. This means that if you install either AMO or ADOMD.NET, you will also get MSOLAP.

Further down the stack, data providers communicate with the server using the XMLA protocol. While XMLA is not a provider, it could be used as a data transport mechanism to send XML documents over the network to client applications that consume XMLA. For more information about XMLA and the ASSL extensions to XMLA, see Developing with Analysis Services Scripting Language (ASSL).

Knowing the version of the Analysis Services instance will help you determine whether you need to install newer versions of the data providers on workstations in your organization.

  • In SQL Server Management Studio, connect to the Analysis Services instance. Right-click the instance you want to check, point to Reports, and click General. Edition and version build information appears in the report.

The major build number of the initial release of SQL Server 2014 is 12.0.2000.9.

For more information about getting version and build information, see How to determine the version and edition of SQL Server and its components.

Data providers are installed with Analysis Services, as well as by client applications that routinely connect to Analysis Services databases, such as Excel.

Office 2007 installs data providers from SQL Server 2005. Office 2010 installs data providers from SQL Server 2008. Office 2013 installs data providers from SQL Server 2012. If you are using multiple versions of Office or SQL Server, and connections or feature availability are not what you expect, you might need to install a newer version of the data providers. You can run multiple major versions of each data provider side by side on the same computer.

Find the file version of the OLEDB provider

  1. Go to \Program Files\Microsoft Analysis Services\AS OLEDB\120.

  2. Right-click msolap120.dll and click Properties.

If you cannot find the file at this location, or if the folder path includes AS OLEDB\110 or AS OLEDB\90, you are using an older library and must now install a newer version (AS OLEDB\11) to connect to SQL Server 2014.

Find the file version of ADOMD.NET and AMO

  1. Go to C:\Windows\Assembly

  2. Right-click Microsoft.AnalysisServices.AdomdClient and click Properties. Click Version.

    For AMO, right-click Microsoft.AnalysisServices.

For more information about version and build numbers by release, see SQL Server Builds on Blogspot.

The version installed on the client computer should match the major version of the server providing the data. If the server installation is newer than the data providers installed on the workstations in your network, you might need to install newer libraries.

Find the data providers on the download site

  1. Go to the Microsoft download center.

  2. Expand Install Instructions.

  3. Scroll down to the section containing Analysis Services components. ADOMD.NET, the OLE DB provider, and AMO are second, third, and fourth in the list. Each library is available in 32-bit or 64-bit versions. Servers and newer workstations running a 64-bit operating system will require the 64-bit version.

Analysis Services OLE DB Provider is the native provider for Analysis Services database connections. MSOLAP is used indirectly by both ADOMD.NET and AMO, delegating connection requests to the data provider. You can also call the OLE DB provider directly from application code, which you might do if solution requirements preclude the use of a managed API.

The Analysis Services OLE DB provider is installed automatically by SQL Server Setup, Excel, and other applications that are frequently used to access Analysis Services databases. You can also install it manually by downloading it from the download center. By default, the provider can be found in the \Program Files\Microsoft Analysis Services folder. The provider must be installed on any workstation used to access Analysis Services data.

MSOLAP110.dll is the version of the Analysis Services OLE DB provider that ships in SQL Server 2014. Other recent previous versions include MSOLAP10.dll (for SQL Server 2008 and 2008 R2) and MSOLAP90.dll (for SQL Server 2005).

OLE DB providers are often specified on connection strings. An Analysis Services connection string uses a different nomenclature to refer to the OLE DB provider: MSOLAP.<version>.dll

MSOLAP.5.dll is the current Analysis Services OLE DB provider installed with Excel 2013. Previous versions, such as MSOLAP.4.dll or MSOLAP.3.dll, are often found on workstations running older versions of Excel. Some Analysis Services features, such as the PowerPivot add-in, require specific versions of the OLE DB provider. See Connection String Properties (Analysis Services) for more information.

ADOMD.NET is a managed data provider used for querying Analysis Services data. Excel uses ADOMD.NET when connecting to a specific Analysis Services cube. The connection string you see in Excel is for an ADOMD.NET connection.

ADOMD.NET is installed by SQL Server Setup and used by SQL Server client applications to connect to Analysis Services. Office installs this library to support data connections from Excel. As with other data providers included in SQL Server, you can redistribute ADOMD.NET if you are using the library in custom code. You can also download and install it manually to get the newer version (see Updating data providers on workstation computers in this topic).

To check file version information, look for ADOMD.NET in the global assembly cache, where it is listed as Microsoft.AnalysisServices.AdomdClient.

When connecting to a database, the connection string properties for all three libraries are largely the same. Almost any connection string you define for ADOMD.NET (ConnectionString) will also work for AMO and the Analysis Services OLE DB provider. See Connection String Properties (Analysis Services) for more information.

For more information about connecting programmatically, see Establishing Connections in ADOMD.NET.

AMO is a managed data provider used for server administration and data definition. For example, SQL Server Management Studio uses AMO to connect to Analysis Services.

AMO is installed by SQL Server Setup and used by SQL Server client applications to connect to Analysis Services. You can also download and install it manually when using AMO in custom code (see Updating data providers on workstation computers in this topic). AMO can be found in the global assembly cache, as Microsoft.AnalysisServices.

A connection using AMO is typically minimal, consisting of “data source=<servername>”. After a connection is established, you use the API to work with database collections and major objects. Both SSDT and SSMS use AMO to connect to an Analysis Services instance.

For more information about connecting programmatically, see Programming AMO Fundamental Objects.

Was this page helpful?
(1500 characters remaining)
Thank you for your feedback

Community Additions

ADD
Show:
© 2014 Microsoft