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Preparing a Windows 7 Deployment Infrastructure for Windows 8

Applies To: Windows 7, Windows 8

IT pros everywhere are deploying Windows 7 using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit (MDT) and System Center 2012 Configuration Manager. You can use your existing Windows 7 deployment infrastructure to deploy Windows 8. This unified deployment approach provides a consistent set of tools for managing your existing Windows 7 deployments.

This guide describes how to prepare your existing Windows 7 deployment infrastructure to deploy Windows 8. This guide assumes that your Windows 7 deployment infrastructure is based on MDT with or without Configuration Manager.

The Microsoft Deployment Toolkit provides centralized management of operating system deployments that is easy to use. MDT provides:

  • Highly-automated deployment of Windows client and server operating systems, including Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows XP, and Windows Server 2003.

  • Centralized management of operating system images, language packs, device drivers, and applications.

Note: In this guide, MDT refers to MDT 2012 Update 1 unless otherwise stated.MDT supports the deployment technologies listed in Table 1that you can use for different deployment infrastructures and scenarios.

Table 1. MDT deployment technologies

 

Technology Description

Lite Touch Installation (LTI)

  • Requires minimal infrastructure and uses a wizard-driven UI for managing and performing deployments.

  • Allows you to specify configuration settings in advance or at the time of deployment.

Zero Touch Installation (ZTI)

  • Requires Configuration Manager with Service Pack 1 (SP1) infrastructure.

  • Requires you to specify all configuration settings in advance of the deployment.

User-Driven Installation (UDI)

  • Requires System Center 2012 Configuration Manager with SP1 infrastructure.

  • Allows you to specify configuration settings in advance or at the time of deployment.

The remainder of this guide is divided into sections that will help you prepare your Windows 7 deployment infrastructure to deploy Windows 8. Each section presents a step, or series of steps, to prepare your Windows 7 deployment infrastructure to deploy Windows 8. You can select and perform the steps in the sections that are applicable to your organization. For example, if your organization only uses LTI-based deployments, then you can focus on those sections. Alternatively, if your organization uses UDI-based deployments then you would focus the sections that relate to UDI.

In this guide:

The first step in preparing the existing Windows 7 deployment infrastructure to deploy Windows 8 is to perform any required infrastructure remediation. The extent of the infrastructure remediation depends on which of the new features in Windows 8 you use. Table 2 lists the types of infrastructure remediation you should perform in an existing Windows 7 infrastructure and describes the type of infrastructure remediation.

Table 2. Infrastructure remediation types

 

Remediation Description

Windows 8 deployment

Infrastructure remediation for adding Windows 8 deployment to an existing Windows 7 deployment infrastructure is minimal. However, these remediation tasks are required to perform highly-automated Windows 8 deployments and you should always perform them regardless of the Windows 8 features you use.

The following is a list of the remediation tasks that typically need to be done for an existing Windows 7 infrastructure:

  • Ensure that the existing Windows 7 deployment infrastructure has sufficient available storage. In addition to the existing Windows 7 storage requirements, the infrastructure must have sufficient available storage for the Windows 8 operating system images, operating system packages, devices drivers, and applications.

  • Ensure that the existing Windows 7 deployment infrastructure has adequate network bandwidth. If the existing infrastructure has adequate network bandwidth for Windows 7 deployments, then the same infrastructure should have sufficient bandwidth for Windows 8.

Note: If the existing Windows 7 deployment infrastructure is inadequate for performing Windows 7 deployments, use the preparation for Windows 8 deployment as an appropriate time to perform any remediation necessary and ensure the infrastructure is adequate to perform Windows 8 and Windows 7 deployments.

Windows 8 feature support

You can perform infrastructure remediation to let users take advantage of the new features in Windows 8 and you can perform such remediation on a feature-by-feature basis. For example, if you want:

  • Improved scaling and performance when accessing files over slow network links between sites by using the BranchCache feature, then upgrade file services and web services to Windows Server 2012.

  • Improved security at start time by using the Measured Boot feature, then upgrade virus and malware protection software to versions that support Windows 8.

  • Reduce the effort for managing BitLocker Drive Encryption by using the Network Unlock feature, then upgrade domain controllers to Windows Server 2012.

Improve management for Windows 8 specific configuration settings by using Group Policy, then upgrade domain controllers to Windows Server 2012 and upgrade Advanced Group Policy Management (AGPM).

Once the infrastructure remediation is complete, the next step is to prepare the MDT environment to deploy Windows 8. You need to complete these steps for each existing installation of MDT in the Windows 7 deployment infrastructure.

The first step in preparing the MDT environment is to install a new MDT instance or upgrade an existing MDT instance. At a minimum, MDT requires Windows 7, but it is recommended to run Windows 8.

We recommend that you install MDT on a new installation of Windows 8 or Windows Server 2012 to make the installation of MDT prerequisites and other deployment components easier, such as the Windows Assessment and Deployment Kit (Windows ADK) and the Microsoft Diagnostics and Recovery Toolkit (DaRT) version 8. Installation of MDT on Windows 7 requires additional steps that you must manually perform to configure MDT. On Windows 8, MDT automatically performs these steps.

Regardless of the operating system chosen, ensure you install the required Windows operating system features as listed in Table 3.

Table 3. Windows operating system features required for MDT

 

Windows versions .NET Framework Windows PowerShell

Windows 8

4

3.0

Windows 7

3.5 with SP1

2.0

Also, ensure that the computer running MDT has sufficient system resources to run:

  • MDT. For more information about the MDT system resource requirements, see the section “Planning MDT Deployments” in the MDT document “Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit” in the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Documentation Library, which is included with MDT.

  • The Configuration Manager Console. If performing Configuration Manager-based deployments, ensure that the computer running MDT meets the Configuration Manager Console requirements as described in Configuration Manager Console Requirements for Configuration Manager with SP1.

MDT 2012 Update 1 and the Windows ADK require Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2 or later operating systems. If you are currently running MDT or System Center 2012 Configuration Manager on an operating system prior to Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2, then you will need to upgrade the operating system to a supported version.

Table 4 lists the options for installing new or upgrading an existing MDT instance and the tasks for performing the option.

Table 4. Options for installing or upgrading MDT instances

 

Option Tasks to complete

Install new MDT instance

  1. Install Windows 8 Professional or Enterprise edition.

  2. Ensure .NET Framework version 4 is installed.

  3. Ensure Windows PowerShell version 3.0 is installed.

  4. Install Windows ADK.

    For more information about how to install the Windows ADK for MDT, see the section “Step 2-2: Install Windows ADK” in the MDT document “Quick Start Guide for Lite Touch Installation” in the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Documentation Library, which is included with MDT.

  5. Install MDT.

    For more information about how to install MDT, see the section “Installing MDT” in the MDT document “Release Notes,” which is included with MDT.

Upgrade existing MDT instance

  1. Ensure .NET Framework version 3.5 with SP1 is installed.

  2. Ensure Windows PowerShell version 2.0 is installed.

  3. Uninstall Windows Automated Installation Kit (Windows AIK).

  4. Install Windows ADK.

    For more information about how to install the Windows ADK for MDT, see the section “Step 2-2: Install Windows ADK” in the MDT document “Quick Start Guide for Lite Touch Installation” in the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Documentation Library, which is included with MDT.

  5. Install MDT.

    Installing MDT automatically removes the existing MDT instance and installs the latest version. For more information about how to install MDT, see the section “Installing MDT” in the MDT document “Release Notes,” which is included with MDT.

After you install MDT, any existing deployment shares need to be upgraded to the most recent version of MDT. The upgrade process ensures the deployment shares contain the most recent version of the MDT scripts and other binary software, which are required to deploy Windows 8. The MDT upgrade process also upgrades the MDT database (MDT DB).

Table 5 lists the options for upgrading the deployment share (based on if the MDT instance is a new instance or an upgraded instance) and the tasks for performing the option.

Table 5. Options for upgrading deployment share

 

Options Tasks to complete

Install new MDT instance

  1. Ensure the user account used to perform the migration has the following permissions:

    • Administrative-level permissions on the computer in which MDT is installed.

    • sysadmin role in the SQL Server instance in which the MDT DB resides.

  2. If the deployment share is stored on the computer running a previous version of MDT, perform the following steps, otherwise continue to the next step:

    1. Copy the deployment share to the newly deployed computer running MDT.

    2. Share the copied deployment share by using the same share permissions used on the existing deployment share.

  3. If required, upgrade the SQL Server running the MDT DB to a version of SQL Server supported by MDT.

    The MDT deployment share upgrade process automatically upgrades the MDT DB. Ensure that the MDT DB is hosted on a version of SQL Server that is supported by MDT. If not, upgrade SQL Server to a supported version prior to upgrading the deployment share. For more information about the supported SQL Server versions, see the section “Prerequisites” in the MDT document “Release Notes,” which is included with MDT.

  4. Upgrade the deployment share.

    This step will ensure the deployment share contains the most recent version of the MDT scripts and other binary software. For more information about how to perform this step, see the section “Upgrade Deployment Shares Not Already Listed in the Deployment Workbench” in the MDT document “Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit” in the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Documentation Library.

Upgrade existing MDT instance

  1. Ensure the user account used to perform the migration has the following permissions:

    • Administrative-level permissions on the computer in which MDT is installed.

    • sysadmin role in the SQL Server instance in which the MDT DB resides.

  2. If required, upgrade the SQL Server running the MDT DB to a version of SQL Server supported by MDT.

    The MDT deployment share upgrade process automatically upgrades the MDT DB. Ensure that the MDT DB is hosted on a version of SQL Server that is supported by MDT. If not, upgrade SQL Server to a supported version prior to upgrading the deployment share. For more information about the supported SQL Server versions, see the section “Prerequisites” in the MDT document “Release Notes,” which is included with MDT.

  3. Upgrade the deployment share.

    This step will ensure the deployment share contains the most recent version of the MDT scripts and other binary software. For more information about how to perform this step, see the section “Upgrade Deployment Shares Not Already Listed in the Deployment Workbench” in the MDT document “Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit” in the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Documentation Library.

The deployment share upgrade process also automatically updates the MDT DB schema and ensures that the MDT DB can store the configuration settings for the current version of MDT. However, if the MDT DB upgrade process is unsuccessful, manually upgrade the MDT DB by using the Upgrade-MDTDatabaseSchema Windows PowerShell cmdlet.

LTI deployments are performed without Configuration Manager. You can manage LTI deployments by using the Deployment Workbench or the MDT Windows PowerShell cmdlets.

Note: If you perform only ZTI- or UDI-based deployments, then you can skip this step and move on to Step 4: Preparing for Configuration Manager deployments.

Import the Windows 8 operating system images that you wish to deploy into the deployment share. You can import operating system images by using the Deployment Workbench or by using the Import-MDTOperatingSystem Windows PowerShell cmdlet (references in Table 6 and shown in Figure 1).

Table 6. Methods for importing operating system images

 

Method Section MDT Guide

Deployment Workbench

Import an Operating System into the Deployment Workbench

Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit

Import- MDTOperatingSystem

Importing an Operating System

Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Samples Guide

Image of wizard

Figure 1. Import Operating System Wizard

The most common type of Windows operating system packages is language packs. If your organization needs to support multiple languages, import each Windows 8 operating system language pack into the deployment share. You can import operating system packages by using the Deployment Workbench or by using the Import-MDTPackage MDT Windows PowerShell cmdlet (references in Table 7).

Table 7. Methods for importing operating system packages

 

Method Section MDT Guide

Deployment Workbench

Import a New Package into the Deployment Workbench

Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit

Import- MDTPackage

Importing an Operating System Package

Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Samples Guide

Some device drivers may be specific to Windows 8 and will need to be added to the deployment share. You can import device drivers by using the Deployment Workbench or by using the Import-MDTDriver MDT Windows PowerShell cmdlet (references in Table 8).

Table 8. Methods for importing device drivers

 

Method Section MDT Guide

Deployment Workbench

Import Device Drivers into the Deployment Workbench

Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit

Import-MDTDriver

Importing a Device Driver

Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Samples Guide

Create a folder structure that separates the Windows 8-specific device drivers from Windows 7-specific device drivers. Creating a separate folder structure allows you to create different selection profiles later in the process and target the right device drivers to the right operating system. You can create folders by using the Deployment Workbench or by using the MDT Windows PowerShell provider and the New-Item Windows PowerShell cmdlet (references in Table 9).

Table 9. Methods for creating deployment share folders

 

Method Section MDT Guide

Deployment Workbench

Create a New Application in the Deployment Workbench

Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit

MDT Windows PowerShell provider and New-Item

Creating a Folder

Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Samples Guide

Windows 8 can run applications that run on Windows 7. Existing MDT applications running on Windows 7 require no modification in order for you to deploy them to Windows 8. However, you will need to create new MDT application for each new Windows 8 app that you want to deploy. You can create MDT applications for Windows 8 apps by using the Deployment Workbench or the Import-MDTApplication MDT Windows PowerShell cmdlet (references in Table 10).

Table 10. Methods for creating MDT applications

 

Method Section MDT Guide

Deployment Workbench

Create a New Application in the Deployment Workbench

Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit

Import-MDTApplication

Creating an Application

Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Samples Guide

For Windows 8 apps that are internally developed or provided by a vendor, you will also need to configure the target devices to trust the certificate used by the Windows 8 app (also called sideloading) by performing the following steps:

  1. Enable installation of trusted apps by using the “Allow all trusted apps to install” Group Policy setting.

    The “Allow all trusted apps to install” Group Policy setting is located at Computer Configuration\Administrative Tools\Windows Components\App Package Deployment.

  2. Add the app certificate to the list of trusted certificates (if not already added) by using Group Policy.

    The Group Policy in which the app certificate should be added is Computer Configuration\Windows Settings\Security Settings\Public Key Policies\Trusted Root Certification Authorities.

For more information about sideloading Windows 8 apps, see Windows 8 Sideloading Requirements.

Custom Windows 8 images (captured from reference devices) allow you to define a consistent and repeatable Windows 8 configuration standard, which helps reduce the ongoing effort for support and improves overall user experience. Custom images often include the user experience (such as the Start screen) and applications that are common to all users.

Typically you will need to create a custom Windows 8 image for each image standard that you have defined for Windows 7. In addition, you need to create Windows 8 image standards for use with the Windows To Go feature in Windows 8. The Windows To Go images are typically smaller in size and may not have all the applications that are included in other Windows 8 images.

Capture custom Windows 8 images by performing the following steps:

  1. Create a task sequence that deploys and captures an image of Windows 8 from a reference device.

    You can create a Windows 8 deployment task sequence based on the Standard Client Task Sequence template in MDT by using the Deployment Workbench or the Import-MDTTaskSequence MDT Windows PowerShell cmdlet (references in Table 11). After you create the tasks sequence, you may need to further customize the task sequence based on the type of deployment you want to perform.

    Table 11. Methods for creating LTI task sequences

     

    Method Section MDT Guide

    Deployment Workbench

    Create a New Task Sequence in the Deployment Workbench

    Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit

    Import-MDTTaskSequence

    Creating a Task Sequence

    Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Samples Guide

  2. Customize the LTI deployment process and operating system and application configuration settings by using the CustomSettings.ini file or the MDT DB.

    Any customizations and configuration settings for the reference device is usually minimal because all of the device-specific settings are cleared by the Sysprep process. However, you may wish to customize the CustomSettings.ini file or the MDT DB to meet your deployment environment, such as specifying MDT log file placement or a share on the SQL Server that hosts the MDT DB. For information, see the section “Configuring MDT Deployments” in the MDT document “Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit” in the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Documentation Library, which is installed with MDT.

  3. Create the LTI boot images used to deploy the reference device by updating the deployment share.

    A new LTI boot image is necessary to deploy Windows 8 to the reference device. You can create new LTI boot images by using the Deployment Workbench or the Update-MDTDeploymentShare MDT Windows PowerShell cmdlet (references in Table 12).

     

    Table 12. Methods for creating LTI boot images

     

    Method Section MDT Guide

    Deployment Workbench

    Create a New Task Sequence in the Deployment Workbench

    Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit

    Import-MDTTaskSequence

    Creating a Task Sequence

    Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Samples Guide

  4. Start the reference device with the LTI boot image, deploy Windows 8, and capture the custom image.

    This process behaves just as it did with Windows 7 with the exception to the updates to the Deployment Wizard as shown in Figure 2.

    Image of wizardFigure 2. Windows Deployment Wizard

  5. Import the custom Windows 8 image to the deployment share.

    Before you can deploy the custom Windows 8 image to targeted devices, you must import the custom image into the deployment share. This is the same process as performed in Step 3-2: Import Windows 8 operating system images.

When creating and capturing the custom Windows 8 image, you need to ensure that all users have the Windows 8 apps available on their Start screen. Windows 8 apps are installed (and uninstalled) on a user-by-user basis. This means that by default, the Windows 8 apps will be deployed to the user account used when performing the deployment (usually the local built-in Administrator account). Although the binary files are installed on the target Windows 8 device, the app icons will not show on the Start screen of other user accounts.

You can ensure all users see the Windows 8 apps on their Start screen by using a number of different methods, such as changing the default user profile, using Group Policy settings, or manually adjusting the Start screen during the MDT deployment process. For more information about how to ensure all users see the Windows 8 apps on their Start screen, see Windows 8 Start Screen Customization with MDT and Configuring Default User Settings.

After the custom Windows 8 images are imported into the deployment share, you need to create task sequences and configuration settings to deploy the custom Windows 8 images. This process is very similar to the process used in Step 3-5: Capture and import custom Windows 8 images.

Prepare to deploy the custom Windows 8 images by performing the following steps:

  1. Create a task sequence that deploys the custom Windows 8 image.

    You can create a Windows 8 deployment task sequence based on the Standard Client Task Sequence template in MDT by using the Deployment Workbench or the Import-MDTTaskSequence MDT Windows PowerShell cmdlet (references in Table 13). After you create the tasks sequence, you may need to further customize the task sequence based on the type of deployment you want to perform.

     

    Table 13. Methods for creating LTI task sequences

     

    Method Section MDT Guide

    Deployment Workbench

    Create a New Task Sequence in the Deployment Workbench

    Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit

    Import-MDTTaskSequence

    Creating a Task Sequence

    Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Samples Guide

  2. Customize the LTI deployment process and operating system and application configuration settings by using the CustomSettings.ini file or the MDT DB.

    These customizations will be minor as you can copy and paste the majority of the configuration settings from CustomSettings.ini files for existing Windows 7 deployment or use the same settings in the MDT DB. You should only need to further customize the configuration settings that are specific to Windows 8 deployments, such as deployment of your Windows 8 apps. For information, see the section “Configuring MDT Deployments” in the MDT document “Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit” in the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Documentation Library, which is installed with MDT.

After the deployment share is fully configured to deploy Windows 8, you need to create or update linked deployment shares. If you created new deployment shares to deploy Windows 8, then create corresponding linked deployment shares as required by your deployment infrastructure. If you create new linked deployment shares, you should need the same number of linked deployment shares as you did for Windows 7 deployment.

You can create a linked deployment share by using the Deployment Workbench or the MDT Windows PowerShell provider and New-Item Windows PowerShell cmdlet (references in Table 14). Before you create the linked deployment share, ensure you create a new or select an existing selection profile that includes the Windows 8 content that you have added to the deployment share.

Table 14. Methods for creating linked deployment share

 

Method Section MDT Guide

Deployment Workbench

Create a New Linked Deployment Share in the Deployment Workbench

Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit

MDT Windows PowerShell provider and New-Item

Creating a Linked Deployment Share

Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Samples Guide

You can update (replicate) a linked deployment share by using the Deployment Workbench or the Replicate-MDTContent MDT Windows PowerShell cmdlet (references in Table 15). Before you update the linked deployment share, ensure the selection profile used to define the linked deployment share includes the Windows 8 content that you have added to the deployment share.

Table 15. Methods for updating linked deployment share

 

Method Section MDT Guide

Deployment Workbench

Replicate Linked Deployment Shares in the Deployment Workbench

Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit

Replicate-MDTContent

Updating a Linked Deployment Share

Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Samples Guide

LTI deployment media allows you to perform LTI deployments from local media without connecting to the original deployment share. Once the deployment share is fully configured to deploy Windows 8, you need to create or update deployment media. If you created new deployment shares to deploy Windows 8, then create corresponding deployment media based on the different number of deployment media needed. If you create new deployment media, you should need the same number of deployment media as you did for Windows 7 deployment.

You can create deployment media by using the Deployment Workbench or the MDT Windows PowerShell provider and New-Item Windows PowerShell cmdlet (references in Table 16). Before you create the linked deployment share, ensure you create a new or select an existing selection profile that includes the Windows 8 content that you have added to the deployment share.

Table 16. Methods for creating deployment media

 

Method Section MDT Guide

Deployment Workbench

Create New Deployment Media in the Deployment Workbench

Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit

MDT Windows PowerShell provider and New-Item

Creating Media

Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Samples Guide

You can update (generate) deployment media by using the Deployment Workbench or the Replicate-MDTContent MDT Windows PowerShell cmdlet (references in Table 17). Before you update the linked deployment share, ensure the selection profile used to define the deployment media includes the Windows 8 content that you have added to the deployment share.

Table 17. Methods for updating deployment media

 

Method Section MDT Guide

Deployment Workbench

Generate Media Images in the Deployment Workbench

Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit

Generate-MDTMedia

Generating Media

Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Samples Guide

If you plan to use LTI deployment media by directly booting from the media on the target device, you need to create a bootable device from the LTI deployment media that includes Windows 8 content. For more information about how to do this, see the section “Create Bootable Devices from Deployment Media” in the MDT document “Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit” in the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Documentation Library, which is installed with MDT.

The final step in preparing LTI to deploy Windows 8 is to update the deployment boot methods, including the following:

Note: You must update Windows Deployment Services to Windows Server 2012 to support the deployment of Windows 8.

You can perform Configuration Manager-based deployments with ZTI or UDI. ZTI deployments are primarily managed by using the Configuration Manager Console. UDI deployments are managed by using a combination of the Configuration Manager Console and the UDI Wizard Designer.

The majority of the preparation steps are the same for ZTI- and UDI-based deployments. Some of the steps apply only to UDI and are designated as such.

Note: If you perform only LTI-based deployments, then you can skip this step.

Deployment of Windows 8 requires that you upgrade your Configuration Manager infrastructure to System Center 2012 Configuration Manager SP1. When performing the upgrade, pay special attention to any updates that are specific to the operating system deployment (OSD) feature and software distribution feature.

Note: Prior to upgrading or installing Configuration Manager 2012 SP1, ensure that the SQL Server version in which the site databases are stored is supported by Configuration Manager 2012 SP1.

Table 18 describes how to upgrade to Configuration Manager 2012 SP1 depending on your existing Configuration Manager infrastructure.

Table 18. Methods for upgrading existing Configuration Manager infrastructure to SP1

 

Existing infrastructure How to upgrade to SP1

System Center 2012 Configuration Manager

Perform in-place upgrades to SP1 on each existing site system server. If remediation is necessary for the OSD and software distribution features, perform the upgrade first and then perform any remediation after the upgrade is complete. Also, upgrade the Configuration Manager Client on existing devices. For more information, see Planning to Upgrade System Center 2012 Configuration Manager and Upgrade Configuration Manager to a New Service Pack.

System Center Configuration Manager 2007

Migrate to SP1 by using a side-by-side migration technique, which requires installing a new System Center 2012 Configuration Manager SP1 site hierarchy and migrating objects and collections from the Configuration Manager 2007 source site hierarchy. For more information, see Introduction to Migration in System Center 2012 Configuration Manager.

Note: If you are also using Microsoft Application Virtualization (App-V) in conjunction with Configuration Manager, you need to upgrade App-V to version 4.6 to support System Center 2012 Configuration Manager SP1.

Before you add Windows 8 content to Configuration Manager, configure Configuration Manager Console integration with MDT. This requires you to install the Configuration Manager Console on the devices running MDT. The process for configuring integration depends if MDT is a fresh install or an in-place upgrade. Table 19 describes how to configure the Configuration Manager Console integration based on the type of MDT installation performed.

Table 19. Configuring Configuration Manager Console integration

 

MDT installation How to configure Configuration Manager Console integration

Fresh installation

  1. Install Configuration Manager 2012 Console on the same computer running MDT..

  2. Configure Configuration Manager Console integration

Upgrade on device running Configuration Manager 2012 Console without SP1

  1. Ensure Configuration Manager Console is closed.

  2. Remove MDT integration with the Configuration Manager Console (as shown in Figure 3).

  3. Upgrade to Configuration Manager Console to Configuration Manager 2012 SP1.

  4. Ensure Configuration Manager Console is closed.

  5. Configure Configuration Manager Console integration (as shown in Figure 3).

Upgrade on device running Configuration Manager 2007 Console

  1. Ensure Configuration Manager Console is closed.

  2. Remove MDT integration with the Configuration Manager Console (as shown in Figure 3).

  3. Uninstall Configuration Manager 2007 Console.

  4. Install Configuration Manager 2012 SP1 Console.

  5. Ensure Configuration Manager Console is closed.

  6. Configure Configuration Manager Console integration (as shown in Figure 3).

Image of wizard

Figure 3. Configure ConfigMgr Wizard

For more information on:

  • Configuration Manager 2012 Console requirements, see Configuration Manager Console Requirements.

  • Installing the Configuration Manager 2012 Console, see Install a Configuration Manager Console.

  • Configuring Configuration Manager Console integration with MDT, see the section “Enable Configuration Manager Console Integration for Configuration Manager 2012” in the MDT document “Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit” in the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Documentation Library, which is installed with MDT.

Versions of the UDI Wizard configuration file (UDIWizard_Config.xml) created prior to MDT require manual changes to be compatible with MDT. Just as with existing task sequences, the UDI Wizard configuration file is not automatically updated as a part of the MDT upgrade process.

You will need to directly modify the UDIWizard_Config.xml file used for Windows 7 deployments. By default, the source for the UDIWizard_Config.xml file is in the MDT Files package that is used in UDI deployments. You can modify the UDIWizard_Config.xml file by using any XML file editor, such as Notepad. After you update the UDIWizard_Config.xml file, ensure you update the package on the distribution points.

For a list of the changes that you need to make to the modify the UDIWizard_Config.xml file, see the section “Known Issues for UDI Deployments” in the “Release Notes” document in the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Documentation Library, which is installed with MDT.

For more information about how to update distribution points with the latest package content, see the task “Update Distribution Points” in the topic How to Manage Packages and Programs in Configuration Manager.

You can manage operating systems source images in the Operating System Installers node in the Operating Systems node in the Software Library workspace in the Configuration Manager Console. The Operating System Installers node contains operating systems that are used to deploy reference devices and are based on the install.wim file from the original Windows 8 operating system media.

For more information, see the section “To add an operating system installer” in the topic How to Manage Operating System Images and Installers in Configuration Manager.

You can manage operating system packages are managed in the Operating System Installers node in the Packages node in the Software Library workspace in the Configuration Manager Console. MDT supports the deployment of operating systems packages:

  • Offline. This method is used by MDT to install operating system packages while running Windows Preinstallation Environment (Windows PE) on the target device.

  • Online. This method is used by MDT to install the operating system packages while running the full Windows operating system on the target device.

If you are importing language packs, the number of language packs that you add to a Configuration Manager 2012 package is based on the type of deployment you are performing. Table 20 lists the deployment method and describes how to determine the number of language packs to include in a single Configuration Manager package.

Table 20. Methods for importing operating system packages

 

Method How to package language packs

ZTI

Include one or more language packs in each Configuration Manager 2012 package. This allows you to bundle the necessary language packs for your organization and include them in one Configuration Manager 2012 package.

If you bundle two or more language packs in a Configuration Manager 2012 package and deploy that package, all language packs will be deployed. If you want to deploy different combination of language packs, then consider bundling one language pack in a Configuration Manager 2012 package and create a separate, conditional task sequence step to deploy each different language pack.

UDI

Include only one language pack in each Configuration Manager 2012 package. This one-to-one relationship allows the user to select individual language packs as desired in the UDI Wizard.

For more information, see the following resources:

Some device drivers may be specific to Windows 8 and you will need to add them to the Configuration Manager driver catalog. The driver catalog is managed in the Divers node in the Operating Systems node in the Software Library workspace in the Configuration Manager Console. Once drivers are added to the driver catalog, you need to create driver packages. Driver packages are a collection of one or more device drivers from the driver catalog and are similar to other software package. You can select the driver packages to include with boot images and operating system deployments. For more information, see the following resources:

  • The section “Managing Device Drivers” in the MDT document “Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit” in the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Documentation Library, which is installed with MDT.

  • The section “Managing Device Drivers in Configuration Manager 2012” in the MDT document “Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit” in the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Documentation Library, which is installed with MDT.

  • How to Manage the Driver Catalog in Configuration Manager.

Windows 8 can run applications that run on Windows 7. So, any Line of Business (LOB) applications that you currently deployed to Windows 7, you can deploy to Windows 8. However, you will need to create new Configuration Manager applications to deploy Windows 8 apps by using the new application model in Configuration ManaFrameworger 2012.

Note: While you can deploy Windows 8 apps by using the package and program model in Configuration Manager, it is recommended that you use the new application model instead.

When you deploy the Configuration Manager applications containing the Windows 8 apps, ensure you deploy to user collections. This is necessary because Windows 8 apps are installed (and uninstalled) on a user-by-user basis. Deploying to user collections will ensure that each targeted user will have access to the app, regardless of the device they log on to.

For Windows 8 apps that are internally developed or provided by a vendor, you will also need to configure the target devices to trust the certificate used by the Windows 8 app (also called sideloading) by performing the following steps:

  1. Enable installation of trusted apps by using the “Allow all trusted apps to install” Group Policy setting.

    The “Allow all trusted apps to install” Group Policy setting is located at Computer Configuration\Administrative Tools\Windows Components\App Package Deployment.

  2. Add the app certificate to the list of trusted certificates (if not already added) by using Group Policy.

    Add the app certificate to the Computer Configuration\Windows Settings\Security Settings\Public Key Policies\Trusted Root Certification Authorities Group Policy setting.

For more information about:

Custom Windows 8 images (captured from reference devices) allow you to define a consistent and repeatable Windows 8 configuration standard, which helps reduce the ongoing effort for support and improves overall user experience. Custom images often include the user experience (such as the Start screen) and applications that are common to all users.

Typically you will need to create a custom Windows 8 image for each image standard that you have defined for Windows 7. In addition, you need to create Windows 8 image standards for use with the Windows To Go feature in Windows 8. The Windows To Go images are typically smaller in size and may not have all the applications that are included in other Windows 8 images.

Capture custom Windows 8 images by performing the following steps:

  1. Create a task sequence that deploys and captures an image of Windows 8 from reference device.

    You can create a Windows 8 deployment task sequence based on the Client Task Sequence template in MDT by using the Create MDT Task Sequence Wizard (as shown in Figure 4) in the Task Sequences node in the Operating Systems node in the Software Library workspace in the Configuration Manager Console. For information, see the section “Create UDI Task Sequences Using the Create MDT Task Sequence Wizard” in the MDT document “Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit” in the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Documentation Library, which is installed with MDT.

    Image of wizardFigure 4. Create MDT Task Sequence Wizard

  2. Customize the deployment process and operating system and application configuration settings by using the CustomSettings.ini file or the MDT DB.

    Any customizations and configuration settings for the reference device is usually minimal because all of the device-specific settings are cleared by the Sysprep process. However, you may wish to customize the CustomSettings.ini file or the MDT DB to meet your deployment environment, such as specifying MDT log file placement or a share on the SQL Server that hosts the MDT DB. For information, see the section “Configuring MDT Deployments” in the MDT document “Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit” in the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Documentation Library, which is installed with MDT.

  3. If performing UDI-based deployments, customize the UDI Wizard behavior by using the UDI Wizard Designer.

    Note: Most of the time, you perform operating system deployment to reference devices by using ZTI. However, there is nothing that prevents the use of UDI. If you are using ZTI to deploy the reference devices, then skip this step.

    You can configure the behavior of the wizard pages in the UDI Wizard by using the UDI Wizard Designer. You can use the UDI Wizard Designer to control which wizard pages are displayed, the order of the wizard pages, and behavior of each control on each wizard page. For information, see the following resources in the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Documentation Library, which is installed with MDT:

    • The section “Configuring UDI Wizard Behavior” in the MDT document “Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit.”

    • The section “Creating Custom Wizard Pages Using the Build Your Own Page Feature” in the MDT document “Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit.”

    • The section “UDI Reference” in the MDT document “Toolkit Reference.”

  4. Update the distribution points with the most current versions of the modified MDT files and MDT settings packages.

    The MDT files package includes the MDT scripts and binary files used by the ZTI and UDI deployment processes. The MDT settings package includes the CustomSettings.ini file.

    Note: If any of the other packages created have been modified, then you also need to update the distribution points with these packages.

    For more information on how to update distribution points with the latest package content, see the task “Update Distribution Points” in the topic How to Manage Packages and Programs in Configuration Manager.

  5. Create the task sequence bootable media used to deploy the reference device by using the Create Task Sequence Media Wizard.

    A new task sequence bootable media image is necessary to deploy Windows 8 to the reference device. You can create a new sequence bootable media image by using the Create Task Sequence Media Wizard as described in How to Create Bootable Media.

    You could also initiate the deployment to the reference device by using Pre-boot Execution Environment (PXE)-initiated deployments as described in How to Deploy Operating Systems by Using PXE in Configuration Manager.

  6. Start the reference device with the task sequence bootable media, deploy Windows 8, and capture the custom image.

    This process behaves just as it did with Windows 7 with the exception to the updates to the UDI Wizard (if UDI is used).

  7. Import the custom Windows 8 image to the deployment share.

    You can manage operating systems images in the Operating System Images node in the Operating Systems node in the Software Library workspace in the Configuration Manager Console. The Operating System Images node contains custom operating system images that are used to deploy the target devices and are based on the image captured from the reference device.

    For more information, see the section “To add an operating system image” in the topic How to Manage Operating System Images and Installers in Configuration Manager.

When creating and capturing the custom Windows 8 image, you need to ensure that all users have the Windows 8 apps available on their Start screen. Windows 8 apps are installed (and uninstalled) on a user-by-user basis. This means that by default the Windows 8 apps will be deployed to the user account used when performing the deployment (usually the local built-in Administrator account). Although the binary files are installed on the target Windows 8 device, the app icons will not show on the Start screen of other user accounts.

You can ensure all users see the Windows 8 apps on their Start screen by using a number of different methods, such as changing the default user profile, using Group Policy settings, or manually adjusting the Start screen during the MDT deployment process. For more information about how to ensure all users see the Windows 8 apps on their Start screen, see Windows 8 Start Screen Customization with MDT and Configuring Default User Settings.

After you import the custom Windows 8 images into Configuration Manager, you need to create task sequences and configuration settings to deploy the custom Windows 8 images. This process is very similar to the process used in Step 4-8: Capture and import custom Windows 8 images.

Prepare to deploy the custom Windows 8 images by performing the following steps:

  1. Create a task sequence that deploys the custom Windows 8 image.

    You can create a Windows 8 deployment task sequence based on the Client Task Sequence template in MDT by using the Create MDT Task Sequence Wizard in the Task Sequences node in the Operating Systems node in the Software Library workspace in the Configuration Manager Console. For information, see the section “Create UDI Task Sequences Using the Create MDT Task Sequence Wizard” in the MDT document “Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit” in the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Documentation Library, which is installed with MDT.

  2. Customize the deployment process and operating system and application configuration settings by using the CustomSettings.ini file or the MDT DB.

    These customizations will be minor as you can copy and paste the majority of the configuration settings from CustomSettings.ini files for existing Windows 7 deployment or use the same settings in the MDT DB. You should only need to further customize the configuration settings that are specific to Windows 8 deployments, such as deployment of your Windows 8 apps. For information, see the section “Configuring MDT Deployments” in the MDT document “Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit” in the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Documentation Library, which is installed with MDT.

  3. If performing UDI-based deployments, customize the UDI Wizard behavior by using the UDI Wizard Designer.

    You can configure the behavior of the wizard pages in the UDI Wizard by using the UDI Wizard Designer (as shown in Figure 5). You can use the UDI Wizard Designer to control which wizard pages are display, the order of the wizard pages, and behavior of each control on each wizard page.

    Image of wizardFigure 5. UDI Wizard Designer

    For information, see the following resources in the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Documentation Library, which is installed with MDT:

    • The section “Configuring UDI Wizard Behavior” in the MDT document “Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit.”

    • The section “Creating Custom Wizard Pages Using the Build Your Own Page Feature” in the MDT document “Using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit.”

    • The section “UDI Reference” in the MDT document “Toolkit Reference.”

  4. Update the distribution points with the most current versions of the modified MDT files and MDT settings packages.

    The MDT files package includes the MDT scripts and binary files used by the ZTI and UDI deployment processes. The MDT settings package includes the CustomSettings.ini file.

    Note: If any of the other packages that you created have been modified, then you also need to update the distribution points with these packages.

    For more information about how to update distribution points with the latest package content, see the task “Update Distribution Points” in the topic How to Manage Packages and Programs in Configuration Manager.

The final step in preparing LTI to deploy Windows 8 is to update the deployment boot methods, including the following:

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