Export (0) Print
Expand All

Using Windows PowerShell

Updated: October 17, 2013

Applies To: Windows PowerShell 2.0, Windows PowerShell 3.0, Windows PowerShell 4.0

Windows PowerShell® is a task-based command-line shell and scripting language designed especially for system administration. Built on the .NET Framework, Windows PowerShell helps IT professionals and power users control and automate the administration of the Windows operating system and applications that run on Windows.

Resources in this section help you learn about Windows PowerShell, features that are included with Windows PowerShell, and the graphical Windows PowerShell editor, Windows PowerShell Integrated Scripting Environment.

What’s In This Section

Content in this section can help you learn more about Windows PowerShell, how to use Windows PowerShell, and what is new in Windows PowerShell in the most current releases.

Related Technologies

Windows PowerShell is part of a family of related scripting technologies that help you automate remote management of Windows-based computers. Links to more information about these technologies are included here for you.

  • Windows PowerShell Workflow. First introduced in Windows PowerShell 3.0, Windows PowerShell Workflow lets IT Pros and developers leverage the benefits of Windows Workflow Foundation with the automation capabilities and ease of Windows PowerShell.

  • Windows PowerShell Web Access. First introduced in Windows Server 2012, Windows PowerShell Web Access acts as a Windows PowerShell gateway, providing a web-based Windows PowerShell console that is targeted at a remote computer. It enables IT Pros to run Windows PowerShell commands and scripts from a Windows PowerShell console in a web browser, with no Windows PowerShell, remote management software, or browser plug-in installation necessary on the client device.

  • Windows PowerShell Web Services (Management OData IIS Extension). Windows PowerShell Web Services is a framework for easily exposing Windows PowerShell cmdlets through an OData-based web service that is running in Web Server (IIS).

  • Get Started with Windows PowerShell Desired State Configuration. Windows PowerShell Desired State Configuration (DSC), introduced in Windows PowerShell 4.0, is a new management platform in Windows PowerShell that enables the deployment and management of configuration data for software services and the environment on which these services run. DSC provides a set of Windows PowerShell language extensions, new cmdlets, and resources that you can use to declaratively specify how you want the state of your software environment to be configured.

  • Windows Management Framework 4.0 Preview includes updates to Windows PowerShell, Windows PowerShell ISE, Windows PowerShell Web Services (Management OData IIS Extension), Windows Remote Management (WinRM), Windows Management Infrastructure (WMI), the Server Manager WMI provider, and a new feature for 4.0, Windows PowerShell Desired State Configuration (DSC). Windows Management Framework 4.0 Preview allows you to install and use these technologies on computers that are running Windows Server 2012, Windows® 7 SP1, and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1.

  • Windows Management Framework 3.0 includes updates to Windows PowerShell, Windows PowerShell ISE, Windows PowerShell Web Services (Management OData IIS Extension), Windows Remote Management (WinRM), Windows Management Infrastructure (WMI), and the Server Manager WMI provider. Windows Management Framework 3.0 allows you to install and use these technologies on computers that are running Windows® 7 SP1, Windows Server 2008 SP2, and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1.

Learning Windows PowerShell

To begin learning Windows PowerShell, start with the following resources:

  • Microsoft Virtual Academy: Getting Started with PowerShell 3.0 Jump Start. This Jump Start is designed to teach busy IT professionals, admins, and help desk people how to use Windows PowerShell to improve management capabilities, automate redundant tasks, and manage the environment in scale. Learn how Windows PowerShellworks and how to make Windows PowerShell work for you from the experts Jeffrey Snover, the inventor of Windows PowerShell, and Jason Helmick, Senior Technologist at Concentrated Technology.

  • Microsoft Virtual Academy: Advanced Tools & Scripting with PowerShell 3.0 Jump Start. IT pros, take this advanced Windows PowerShell course to find out how to turn your real time management and automation scripts into useful reusable tools and cmdlets. You’ll learn the best patterns and practices for building and maintaining tools and you’ll pick up some special tips and tricks along the way from the architect and inventor of Windows PowerShell, Distinguished Engineer Jeffrey Snover, and IT pro, Jason Helmick.

  • Getting Started with Windows PowerShell. An introduction and tutorial, including system requirements and instructions for installing and starting Windows PowerShell on all supported operating systems.

  • Windows PowerShell User's Guide. A detailed introduction, including real-world scripts and scenarios to get you started.

  • Windows PowerShell Core Module Reference. An alphabetized list of help topics for the language features and cmdlets included as part of the Windows PowerShell engine.

  • Windows and Windows Server Automation with Windows PowerShell. An alphabetized list of help topics for Windows PowerShell modules that are included as part of features or server roles included in Windows Server and Windows Client.

  • System Center Automation with Windows PowerShell. An alphabetized list of help topics for Windows PowerShell modules that are included with components of Microsoft System Center.

Downloading and Updating Windows PowerShell Help

The following topics describe how you can get the latest Help for Windows PowerShell and display it at the Windows PowerShell command prompt.

  • Update-Help cmdlet. A Windows PowerShell cmdlet that downloads and installs the newest versions of help topics for Windows PowerShell modules on your computer.

    For more information about the Updatable Help system in Windows PowerShell, including how to install Updatable Help on network-isolated computers, see about_Updatable_Help, Save-Help, and Supporting Updatable Help.

  • Get-Help cmdlet. A Windows PowerShell cmdlet that you can use to learn about the cmdlets and providers that are installed on your system.

  • You can get notifications about any updates to published Help files by subscribing to the following RSS feed: http://sxp.microsoft.com/feeds/msdntn/PowerShellHelpVersions.



Was this page helpful?
(1500 characters remaining)
Thank you for your feedback

Community Additions

ADD
Show:
© 2014 Microsoft