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Windows Error Reporting and the Problem Reports and Solutions Feature in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2

Updated: December 16, 2009

Applies To: Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2

In this section

Benefits and purposes of Windows Error Reporting and the Problem Reports and Solutions feature

Overview: Using Windows Error Reporting and the Problem Reports and Solutions feature in a managed environment

How Windows Error Reporting communicates with an Internet site

Controlling Windows Error Reporting to prevent the flow of information to and from the Internet

Procedures to configure Windows Error Reporting

This section explains how the Windows® Error Reporting and the Problem Reports and Solutions feature in Windows 7 and Windows Server® 2008 R2 communicate across the Internet, and it explains steps to take to limit, control, or prevent that communication in an organization with many users.

noteNote
The Problem Reports and Solutions feature in Action Center is an interface that displays information from Windows Error Reporting and communicates with the Internet only through Windows Error Reporting.

In Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Error Reporting and the Problem Reports and Solutions feature work together to make it easy to find solutions online for computer problems:

  • Windows Error Reporting: Windows Error Reporting in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 is a feature that allows Microsoft® to track and address errors that are relating to the operating system, Windows features, and applications. Windows Error Reporting gives you, the administrator, the opportunity to send data about errors to Microsoft and to receive information about solutions.

    Solution information can include instructions for working around a problem, or a link to the Windows Update Web site or another Web site for updated drivers, patches, or Microsoft Knowledge Base articles. Microsoft developers can use Windows Error Reporting as a problem-solving tool to address customer problems in a timely manner and to improve the quality of Microsoft products.

  • Problem Reports and Solutions: The Problem Reports and Solutions feature in Action Center helps you track problem reports and solution information that you have received from Microsoft. Action Center helps you store the solution information, which is displayed by using a Web browser. However, all Internet communication that is related to the problem reports and solutions is handled by Windows Error Reporting.

In Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Error Reporting has the following consent levels to help you control how Windows Error Reporting prompts you before sending data:

  • Automatically check for solutions (recommended).   Windows Error Reporting sends the minimum data required to check for an existing solution, for example, the application name and version, module name and version, and exception code. After sending this data, Windows Error Reporting prompts you for consent before sending any additional data that is needed to solve the problem.

  • Automatically check for solutions and send additional report data, if needed.   Windows Error Reporting automatically checks for solutions and sends additional information that is needed to solve the problem (typically, the user is not prompted)

  • Each time a problem occurs, ask me before checking for solutions.   Windows Error Reporting always prompts for consent before sending an error report.

  • Never check for solutions (not recommended).   This setting disables Windows Error Reporting.

  • Send all data (Group Policy setting only).   This setting can only be configured through Group Policy, not through the Initial Configuration Tasks interface, Server Manager, or Control Panel. Any data requested by Microsoft will be sent without prompts.

If a prompt appears for someone who is logged on as an administrator, the person can choose to report application and operating system errors. If a prompt appears for someone who is not logged on as an administrator, the person can choose to report application errors plus errors for operating system software that does not require administrative credentials to run.

Error reporting can be controlled through the Initial Configuration Tasks interface or Server Manager, as outlined in Consent levels in Windows Error Reporting earlier in this section. It can also be controlled in Control Panel\Problem Reports and Solutions\Change settings\Advanced settings. In Control Panel, an administrator can modify the settings as follows:

  • Enable or disable Windows Error Reporting for everyone using the computer or for a specific person using the computer.

  • Set the consent level (described earlier) for Windows Error Reporting for everyone using the computer or for a specific person using the computer.

  • Specify programs for which error reports should never be sent.

In a managed environment, you can choose to disable Windows Error Reporting or control it as follows:

  • You can use Group Policy or an answer file for an unattended installation to control the consent level (described earlier) to determine the amount of prompting that users or administrators see before information about a software problem is sent to Microsoft. For example, you can set the consent level so the person using the computer is always prompted before information is sent.

  • You can use Group Policy to disable Windows Error Reporting.

  • You can redirect error reports to a server on your intranet by using the Group Policy setting, Configure Corporate Windows Error Reporting.

To fully manage error reporting on a local server, you need to purchase software and software services for analyzing the errors that you capture on your servers. Based on your policies and the data in the error reports, you can filter the reports before they are sent to Microsoft. Such software is also useful to determine the types of problems users and administrators are experiencing most often.

For more information about Microsoft software designed for use with the Group Policy setting, Configure Corporate Windows Error Reporting, see System Center Operations Manager on the Microsoft Web site.

For more information about the underlying functionality that redirects error reports to a server on your intranet, see WER Settings on the MSDN® Web site.

For more information about the answer-file entries or Group Policy settings described in this subsection, see Controlling Windows Error Reporting to prevent the flow of information to and from the Internet later in this section.

The data that Microsoft collects through Windows Error Reporting is used strictly for the purpose of tracking and solving problems that users and administrators are experiencing. This subsection describes various aspects of the data that is sent to and from the Internet during error reporting, and how the exchange of information takes place. The next subsection provides additional details.

  • Specific information sent or received: In most cases, the information that is collected for an error report only includes software parameters, which include such information as the application name and version, module name and version, and exception code. In unusual cases, a more complete crash report might be collected. Rarely, some information that is unique to the person who is using the computer might be collected unintentionally. This information, if present, is not used to identify the person.

    Microsoft may send solution information back to the user or administrator about a problem, including links to Web sites.

  • Default settings: By default, error reporting is enabled on computers running Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2. However, additional configuration steps are needed to configure error reporting, and no reports are sent unless these steps are completed.

    When Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 are installed and a computer is started for the first time, the Initial Configuration Tasks interface appears, which displays a variety of tasks including Enable automatic updating and feedback. In this task, you can choose to enable a default level of automatic updating and feedback (which includes error reporting), or you can manually configure settings. For details about consent levels, see Consent levels in Windows Error Reporting earlier in this section.

  • Triggers: The opportunity to send an error report is triggered by application or system errors.

  • User notification: User notification depends on the consent level. See Consent levels in Windows Error Reporting earlier in this section.

    Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 provide reminders (in the form of balloon notifications) to check for solutions to reports that have not been sent, for example, reports that were generated in the background or while you were offline.

  • Logging: Descriptions of system and application errors are recorded in the event log. In addition, the Problem Reports and Solutions feature records information about problem reports sent and solution information received on that computer, so that the user or administrator can investigate solutions later (although new solutions might overwrite old solutions if the number of stored solutions exceeds the allowed maximum).

  • Encryption: All report data that could include personal information is encrypted during transmission using HTTPS, that is, Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) or Transport Layer Security (TLS) with HTTP. The software parameters information, which includes such information as the application name and version, module name and version, and exception code, is not encrypted.

  • Access: Microsoft employees and contingent staff may access the error reports to maintain Windows Error Reporting or improve Microsoft products. They may not use the reports for other purposes.

    If the error report indicates that one or more non-Microsoft products were involved in causing the problem, Microsoft may send the report to the respective companies if the companies agree to abide by the terms of the privacy statement. Software or hardware developers (employed by Microsoft or one of its partners) may analyze the fault data and try to identify and correct the problem.

  • Privacy: For more information, see Privacy Statement for the Microsoft Error Reporting Service .

    Details related to privacy of data are presented in Types of data collected later in this section.

  • Transmission protocol and port: The transmission protocols are HTTP through port 80 and HTTPS through port 443.

  • Ability to disable: The feature can be disabled through Group Policy or on an individual computer running Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2. You can also control the feature in other ways, as described in Overview: Using Windows Error Reporting and the Problem Reports and Solutions feature in a managed environment earlier in this section, and Controlling Windows Error Reporting to prevent the flow of information to and from the Internet later in this section.

This section provides an overview of the data that Windows Error Reporting collects and information about data that might be collected from four different sources:

  • Application errors

  • Handwriting recognition errors

  • Japanese Input Method Editor errors

  • Windows kernel failures

Windows Error Reporting collects information about the computer configuration, what the software was doing when the problem occurred, and other information directly related to the problem. Windows Error Reporting does not intentionally collect anyone’s name, address, e-mail address, or computer name. It is possible that such information may be captured in memory or in the data collected from open files, but Microsoft does not use it to identify users. Windows Error Reporting collects Internet Protocol (IP) addresses, but the addresses are not used to identify users, and in many cases, they are the address of a network address translation (NAT) computer or proxy server, not a specific client behind that NAT computer or proxy server.

IP address information is used in aggregate by the operators who maintain the servers that receive error reports.

In rare cases, such as problems that are especially difficult to solve, Microsoft may request additional data, including sections of memory (which may include memory shared by any or all applications that were running at the time the problem occurred), some registry settings, and one or more files from your computer. When additional data is requested, you can review the data and choose whether to send the information.

Any application can be written in a way that uses the Error Reporting functionality. If an application error occurs for which Error Reporting is available and you choose to send the report, the information included is as follows:

  • The digital product ID, which can be used to identify your license.

  • Information regarding the condition of the computer and the application at the time the error occurred. This includes data that is stored in memory and stacks, information about files in the application's directory, the operating system version, and the computer hardware in use. This information is packaged into a “minidump” file (a small memory dump). The minidump file contains:

    • Exception information: This is information regarding the problem that occurred. It tells Microsoft what kind of instruction the application received that caused it to generate an error.

    • System information: This is data about the kind of CPU you have and what operating system you are running.

    • A list of all the modules that are currently loaded and their version information.

    • A list of all the threads that are currently running. For each thread, the current context and the whole stack are collected.

    • Global data.

    The minidump data is shown as a hexadecimal representation that you cannot read.

    noteNote
    For more information, see Minidump Files on the MSDN Web site.

In Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2, you can use a registry setting to configure Windows Error Reporting so that it collects full user-mode dumps and stores them locally after a user-mode application crashes. This configuration option in Windows Error Reporting does not involve communication across the Internet.

For more information, see Collecting User-Mode Dumps on the Microsoft Web site.

If you use the Tablet PC Input Panel and encounter a handwriting recognition error, you can start the error reporting tool and then select recently corrected handwriting samples to send in an error report. The samples are handled according to the consent level setting, and in most cases, they are sent only when you explicitly consent. No personal information is intentionally collected; however, the samples that are chosen may include personal information. This information will not be used to personally identify you.

You can disable the reporting of handwriting recognition errors by using a specific Group Policy setting, as described in Setting for disabling Windows Error Reporting later in this section.

In the Japanese versions of Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2, you can generate a "word registration report" through the Japanese Input Method Editor (IME) and then choose to send the report to Microsoft. The reports are like error reports, but they record a word or word pair to improve the selection of the ideograms that are displayed. Word registration reports can include the information you provide in the Add Word dialog box about the words being reported, and the software version number for IME. Each time such a report is generated, you are asked whether to send the report to Microsoft. You can view the information that is contained in the report before you choose to send it.

Microsoft uses the information to help improve IME. Personal information might unintentionally be collected, but Microsoft does not use the information to identify you or contact you. Word registration reports are sent to Microsoft using HTTPS, that is, Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) or Transport Layer Security (TLS) with HTTP.

If you configure Windows Error Reporting as described in Procedures to configure Windows Error Reporting later in this section, you can control word registration reports in the same way that you control error reports.

When a kernel-mode (system) error occurs, Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 display a Stop message and write diagnostic information to a memory dump file. When someone restarts the computer by using normal mode or Microsoft Windows Safe Mode (with networking), and then logs on to Windows Server 2008 R2 as an administrator, Windows Error Reporting responds. As with other errors, Windows Error Reporting uses the consent level setting to determine when to prompt you before sending a kernel fault report.

Windows kernel fault reports contain information about what the operating system was doing when the problem occurred. These event reports contain the minimum information that can help identify why the operating system stopped unexpectedly. If you choose to send the report, it includes the following:

  • Operating system name (for example, Windows Server 2008 R2)

  • Operating system version

  • Operating system language as represented by the locale identifier (LCID)—(for example, the standard international numeric abbreviation, 1033, for United States English)

  • Loaded and recently unloaded drivers. These identify the modules used by the kernel when the Stop error occurred and the modules that were used recently

  • List of drivers in the Drivers folder on the hard disk drive (systemroot\System32\Drivers)

  • File size, date created, version, manufacturer, and full product name for each driver

  • Number of available processors

  • Amount of random access memory (RAM)

  • Time stamp that indicates when the Stop error occurred

  • Messages and parameters that describe the Stop error

  • Processor context for the process that stopped. This includes the processor, hardware state, performance counters, multiprocessor packet information, deferred procedure call information, and interrupts (requests from software or devices for processor attention).

  • Process information and kernel context for the halted process. This includes the offset (location) of the directory table and the database that maintains the information about every physical page (block of memory) in the operating system.

  • Process information and kernel context for the thread that stopped. This information identifies registers (data-storage blocks of memory in the processor) and interrupt-request levels, and it includes pointers to data structures for operating system data.

  • Kernel-mode call stack for the interrupted thread. This is a data structure that consists of a series of memory locations and one or more pointers.

To control the flow of information to and from the Internet when users or administrators report errors, you can configure Windows Error Reporting by using an answer file with an unattended installation or by using Group Policy. The following subsections provide more details.

You can control the consent level for Windows Error Reporting by using an answer file with an unattended installation. To configure a consent level of Always ask before sending data, confirm that your answer file includes the following line:

<DefaultConsent>1</DefaultConsent>

For more information, see To control the consent level for Windows Error Reporting by using an answer file with an unattended installation later in this section.

This section provides information about a small set of the Group Policy settings that are available for Windows Error Reporting. For information about viewing these and other Group Policy settings, see To locate Group Policy settings for configuring Windows Error Reporting later in this section.

This setting is located in Computer Configuration under Policies (if present), in Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Windows Error Reporting\Advanced Error Reporting Settings.

ImportantImportant
To see the Group Policy settings for Windows Error Reporting in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2: On the Extended tab, view the Requirements (operating system requirements) listed for the setting. Some settings are supported on Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2, and some are not.

  • Configure Corporate Windows Error Reporting: Use this setting to specify a server in your organization to which you want error reports to be sent (instead of being sent directly to Microsoft). If you enable this setting, you can specify your server name and port, and choose whether the reports should be sent by using Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), which provides additional security for the connection. For more information about using this setting, see Overview: Using Windows Error Reporting and the Problem Reports and Solutions feature in a managed environment earlier in this section.

Two settings in the Advanced Error Reporting Settings refer to the "Report Queue" and the "Report Archive." These both refer to information that is stored on the local computer running Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2. The Report Queue temporarily stores error reports that are waiting to be sent. The Report Archive stores reports so that the Problem Reports and Solutions interface can display them.

You can control the degree to which Windows Error Reporting prompts you for consent before data is sent. This setting is located in Computer Configuration or in User Configuration, under Policies (if present), in Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Windows Error Reporting\Consent.

ImportantImportant
To see Group Policy settings for Windows Error Reporting in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2: on the Extended tab, view the Requirements (operating system requirements) listed for the setting. Some settings are supported on Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2, and some are not.

  • Configure Default consent: If you enable this setting, you can select one of the following consent levels:

    • Always ask before sending data: Windows Error Reporting always prompts for consent before sending an error report.

    • Send parameters: Windows Error Reporting sends the minimum data required to check for an existing solution, for example, the application name and version, module name and version, and exception code. After sending this data, Windows Error Reporting prompts you for consent before sending any additional data requested by Microsoft.

    • Send parameters and safe additional data: Windows Error Reporting sends the minimum data required to check for an existing solution in addition to data that the developer of the program has designated as being highly unlikely to contain personal information. Windows Error Reporting then prompts you for consent before sending any additional data requested by Microsoft.

    • Send all data: Any data requested by Microsoft is sent, without prompts. (This setting can only be configured through Group Policy, not through the Initial Configuration Tasks interface, Server Manager, or Control Panel.)

You can use a Group Policy setting to specifically disable reporting handwriting recognition errors. This setting is located in Computer Configuration or in User Configuration under Policies (if present), in Administrative Templates\System\Internet Communication Management\Internet Communication settings.

  • Turn off handwriting recognition error reporting: If you enable this setting, you cannot start the error reporting tool for handwriting recognition errors, and corrected handwriting samples will never be sent by Windows Error Reporting.

This setting is located in Computer Configuration under Policies (if present), in Administrative Templates\System\Internet Communication Management\Internet Communication settings.

  • Turn off Windows Error Reporting: If you enable this setting, you can still view settings in the Initial Configuration Tasks interface, Server Manager, or Control Panel, but the display informs you that settings are being managed by a system administrator.

ImportantImportant
You can also restrict Internet access for Windows Error Reporting and a number of other features by applying the Restrict Internet communication Group Policy setting, which is located in Computer Configuration under Policies (if present), in Administrative Templates\System\Internet Communication Management. For more information about this Group Policy and the policies that it controls, see Appendix C: Group Policy Settings Listed Under the Internet Communication Management Category in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2.

The following procedures explain how to:

  • Use the Initial Configuration Tasks interface or Server Manager to view or change settings for Windows Error Reporting on a computer running Windows Server 2008 R2.

  • Use Control Panel to view or change settings for Windows Error Reporting on a computer running Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2.

  • Use the Configure Corporate Windows Error Reporting Group Policy setting so error reports are sent to a server on your intranet instead of to Microsoft.

  • Locate the Group Policy settings for configuring error reporting.

  • Disable the reporting of handwriting recognition errors.

  • Disable Windows Error Reporting by using Group Policy.

  • Control the consent level for error reporting by using an answer file for an unattended installation.

Following are two procedures that you can use to view or change the Windows CEIP setting on a computer running Windows Server 2008 R2:

  • Use Initial Configuration Tasks. (Use this procedure if you recently installed Windows Server 2008 R2, and the Initial Configuration Tasks interface is displayed.)

  • Use Server Manager.

  1. Under Update This Server, click Enable automatic updating and feedback.

  2. Click Manually configure settings.

  3. Under Windows Error Reporting, click Change Setting.

  4. In the resulting dialog box, view or change the settings.

    The settings, including the setting for turning off Windows Error Reporting, are described in Consent levels in Windows Error Reporting earlier in this section.

  1. If the Initial Configuration Tasks interface is not displayed and Server Manager is not running, click Start, click Administrative Tools, and then click Server Manager. (If the User Account Control dialog box appears, confirm that the action it displays is what you want, and then click Continue.)

  2. In Server Manager, make sure Resources and Support is expanded.

  3. Click Configure Windows Error Reporting.

  4. In the resulting dialog box, view or change the settings.

    The settings, including the setting for turning off Windows Error Reporting, are described in Consent levels in Windows Error Reporting earlier in this section.

  1. Click Start, and then click Control Panel (or point to Settings, and then click Control Panel).

  2. Click Action Center, and then click Maintenance.

  3. Under Check for solutions to problem reports, click Settings.

  4. Under Choose when to check for solutions to problem reports, view or change the basic error reporting settings as described earlier in this document.

    You can configure additional error reporting options as follows:

    • Click Change report settings for all users. These settings can be used to configure error reporting for all users of the computer or to allow each user to choose their settings (the default).

    • Click Select programs to exclude from reporting: This setting allows you to manage the list of programs for which Windows Error Reporting is enabled.

  1. See Appendix B: Resources for Learning About Group Policy for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 for information about using Group Policy. Using an account with domain administrative credentials, log on to a computer running Windows Server 2008 R2 (with the Group Policy Management feature installed) or Windows 7. Then open Group Policy Management Console (GPMC) by running gpmc.msc and edit an appropriate Group Policy Object (GPO).

  2. Expand Computer Configuration, expand Policies (if present), expand Administrative Templates, expand Windows Components, expand Windows Error Reporting, and then click Advanced Error Reporting Settings.

  3. In the details pane, double-click Configure Corporate Windows Error Reporting, and then click Enabled.

  4. Specify the name and port of the server to which error reports should be sent, and choose whether the reports should be sent using Secure Sockets Layer (SSL).

    ImportantImportant
    When you configure this setting, be sure to open Advanced Error Reporting Settings, and then use the Configure Corporate Windows Error Reporting setting. Avoid using a similar setting that supports Windows XP and is designed for use with older versions of the tool for analyzing errors that you capture on your servers. This setting is in Computer Configuration under Policies (if present), in Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Windows Error Reporting\Configure Error Reporting. (In this setting, you can specify the corporate upload file path.)

    For more information about using the Configure Corporate Windows Error Reporting setting, see Overview: Using Windows Error Reporting and the Problem Reports and Solutions feature in a managed environment earlier in this section.

  1. See Appendix B: Resources for Learning About Group Policy for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 for information about using Group Policy. Using an account with domain administrative credentials, log on to a computer running Windows Server 2008 R2 (with the Group Policy Management feature installed) or Windows 7. Then open Group Policy Management Console (GPMC) by running gpmc.msc and edit an appropriate Group Policy Object (GPO).

  2. If you are interested in policy settings that apply to all users of a computer and that come into effect when the computer starts or when Group Policy is refreshed, expand Computer Configuration. If you are interested in policy settings that apply to specific users or administrators and that come into effect when a person logs on or when Group Policy is refreshed, expand User Configuration.

  3. Expand Policies (if present), expand Administrative Templates, and then expand Windows Components.

  4. Click Windows Error Reporting, and then view the settings that are available.

    ImportantImportant
    When you look at Group Policy settings for Windows Error Reporting on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2, on the Extended tab, view the Requirements (operating system requirements) listed for the setting. Some settings are supported on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2, and some are not.

  5. Click Advanced Error Reporting Settings, and then view the settings that are available. (What you selected in step 2 affects what you see in Advanced Error Reporting Settings. If you want to view Configure Corporate Windows Error Reporting, you must select Computer Configuration in step 2.)

  6. In the left pane, click Consent, and then view the settings that are available.

  1. See Appendix B: Resources for Learning About Group Policy for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 for information about using Group Policy. Using an account with domain administrative credentials, log on to a computer running Windows Server 2008 R2 (with the Group Policy Management feature installed) or Windows 7. Then open Group Policy Management Console (GPMC) by running gpmc.msc and edit an appropriate Group Policy Object (GPO).

  2. If you are interested in policy settings that apply to all users of a computer and that come into effect when the computer starts or when Group Policy is refreshed, expand Computer Configuration. If you are interested in policy settings that apply to specific users or administrators and that come into effect when a person logs on or when Group Policy is refreshed, expand User Configuration.

  3. Expand Policies (if present), expand Administrative Templates, expand System, expand Internet Communication Management, and then click Internet Communication settings.

  4. In the details pane, double-click Turn off handwriting recognition error reporting, and then click Enabled.

    ImportantImportant
    You can also restrict Internet access for Windows Error Reporting and a number of other features by applying the Restrict Internet communication Group Policy setting, which is located in Computer Configuration under Policies (if present), in Administrative Templates\System\Internet Communication Management. For more information about this Group Policy setting and the policies that it controls, see Appendix C: Group Policy Settings Listed Under the Internet Communication Management Category in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2.

  1. As needed, see Appendix B: Resources for Learning About Group Policy for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2, and then edit an appropriate GPO.

  2. Expand Computer Configuration, expand Policies (if present), expand Administrative Templates, expand Windows Components, and then expand Windows Error Reporting.

  3. In the details pane, double-click Disable Windows Error Reporting, and then click Enabled.

    If you enable this setting, you can still view settings in the Initial Configuration Tasks interface, Server Manager, and Control Panel, but the display informs you that settings are being managed by a system administrator.

    ImportantImportant
    You can also restrict Internet access for Windows Error Reporting and a number of other features by applying the Restrict Internet communication Group Policy setting, which is located in Computer Configuration under Policies (if present), in Administrative Templates\System\Internet Communication Management. For more information about this Group Policy and the policies that it controls, see Appendix C: Group Policy Settings Listed Under the Internet Communication Management Category in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2.

  1. Use the methods you prefer to create an answer file for an unattended installation. For detailed information about entries to include in the answer file, see Unattend.chm in the Windows Automated Installation Kit.

  2. Confirm that your answer file includes one of the following lines:

    • For a consent level of Always ask before sending data: <DefaultConsent>1</DefaultConsent>

    • For a consent level of Send parameters: <DefaultConsent>2</DefaultConsent>

    • For a consent level of Send parameters and safe additional data: <DefaultConsent>3</DefaultConsent>

    • For a consent level of Send all data: <DefaultConsent>4</DefaultConsent>

    For additional information about an unattended installation, see the resources listed in Appendix A: Resources for Learning About Automated Installation and Deployment for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2.

For more information about Windows Error Reporting, see the following resources on the Microsoft Web site:

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