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Windows Small Business Server 2008 Features and Scenarios

Updated: February 4, 2010

Applies To: Windows SBS 2008

Choice of Standard or Premium editions

Depending on the needs of an organization, you can choose either the Standard or the Premium edition of Windows SBS 2008.

Windows SBS 2008 Standard is for a small organization that does not run a line-of-business application. The Standard edition includes the following:

  • Windows Server 2008 Standard Technologies

  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2007

  • Windows SharePoint Services 3.0

  • Windows Server Update Services 3.0

  • Microsoft Forefront Security for Exchange Server (120-day trial version)

  • Integration with Office Live Small Business

  • Five Windows SBS 2008 Standard CALs

Windows SBS 2008 Premium includes additional software that makes it possible to run a line-of-business application. Microsoft designed Windows SBS 2008 Premium to run on two hardware servers.

Windows SBS 2008 Premium includes everything in the Standard edition, plus the following, which run on the second server:

  • Windows Server 2008 Standard

  • SQL Server 2008 Standard for Small Business (32-bit and 64-bit versions)

Windows Small Business Server 2008 Installation Wizard

The Installation Wizard helps you set up and configure all of the applications and features in Windows SBS 2008. After you install the server, the administrator can access the Windows SBS Console home page and perform Getting Started Tasks that configure Windows SBS 2008 to the organization’s business needs. Compared with how long it would take to install and configure the individual product technologies, the Installation Wizard significantly decreases the deployment time.

If you want to perform an unattended installation, you can use the Windows Small Business Server 2008 Answer File Tool to create an answer file. The answer file contains your server information, company information, and network administrator account information. For more information about answer files, see “Tell Me More About Using Answer Files” (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=155967).

For step-by-step instructions about how to install Windows SBS 2008 Standard, see the “Windows Small Business Server 2008 Installation Guide” (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=104791).

For step-by-step instructions about how to install Windows SBS 2008 Premium, see the “Windows Small Business Server 2008 Premium Installation Guide” (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=124564).

Server migration

If you have an existing Windows SBS 2003 or Windows SBS 2008 network, you can install Windows SBS 2008 in Migration Mode. Doing this runs the Windows SBS 2008 Migration Wizard. The Windows SBS 2008 Migration Wizard helps you move settings and data from the Source Server to the Destination Server. Some tasks in the Migration Wizard are required, and some are optional. You must complete the required tasks in the order that they are listed in the Migration Wizard. You can either skip optional tasks or complete them at a more convenient time, such as when no users are logged on to the network.

Although the Migration Wizard includes links to Help content, it is recommended that you read the detailed guidance that is available at the Microsoft Web site. The following documents are available:

noteNote
You must complete the migration process within 21 days of finishing your Windows SBS 2008 installation.

Windows SBS Console

Windows SBS 2008 features a management console. The console includes many wizards and pre-programmed tasks that make it easier to configure and manage your network. By using the Windows SBS Console, you can accomplish the following administrative tasks:

  • Complete post-installation tasks that enable features and help protect server data.

  • View high-level network status.

  • Manage user accounts and groups on the network.

  • Manage computers, printers, faxes, and network connectivity.

  • Manage access and settings for shared folders and Web sites.

  • Manage backup, restore, and data storage.

  • Add and customize server reports.

  • Manage updates, anti-spam, and antivirus settings.

noteNote
For advanced administrative tasks and to manage all other server resources on the network, you should use the Windows Server 2008 Server Manager console or other tools that are included with Windows Server 2008.

For more information about the Windows SBS Console, see “Administering Windows Small Business Server 2008 by Using the Windows SBS Console” (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=155969).

Network configuration

Network discovery

Windows SBS 2008 uses the Simple Service Discovery Protocol (SSDP), UPnP, and the Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) to find routers on the network. If you know the IP address of the local area network (LAN) adapter on your router and you want to specify the IP address of the server, make sure that the IP address of the server is in the same subnet range as the IP address of the LAN connection on your router. Also make sure that the IP address is not currently used on the network. If you do not specify the IP address, Network Discovery automatically configures the server during installation.

Internet connectivity

Most small businesses do not need the same amount of Internet bandwidth that a larger enterprise needs. The typical Windows SBS 2008 customer finds that a DSL or cable connection provides sufficient bandwidth. If the server is connected to the network and the router is configured correctly, the Internet connection is set up automatically when you install Windows SBS 2008. However, you may have to run the Connect to the Internet Wizard to set up or to repair your Internet connection for any of the following reasons:

  • The Internet connection on your server was not set up successfully during installation.

  • You install a new router or software firewall.

  • The Internet connection on your server is lost for any reason.

Internet address integration

Windows SBS 2008 includes the Internet Address Management Wizard (IAMW) to configure technologies that enable Remote Web Workplace and e-mail over the Internet. If you want to use these key features, you must run the IAMW after you connect to the Internet.

As an option, the wizard can also help you register or configure an Internet domain name. To help secure the network, it is recommended that you use an internal domain name that is different from your Internet domain name. Depending on the needs of your organization, the IAMW can help you with the following:

  • If you already own a domain name but you want to transfer support to a new provider, the wizard helps you set up the existing domain name with the new provider.

  • If you own a domain name that is registered with one of the Windows SBS 2008 domain name provider partners, the wizard helps you specify the domain name. It then automates internal setup that may be required.

  • If you own a domain name that is not registered with one of the Windows SBS 2008 domain name provider partners, the wizard helps you specify the domain name. It then automates internal setup that may be required. However, you must set up the external DNS records manually.

  • If you want to acquire an Internet domain name, the wizard helps you find a domain name provider. It then helps you register the domain name and automates subsequent internal or external setup that may be required.

When you run the IAMW, if you select I want the server to manage the domain name for me, the wizard creates the following Internet DNS records and registers them with the domain name provider. When you use the IAMW to configure your Internet address, you remove much of the overhead and risk that is associated with configuring these settings manually. If you decide to manage the domain name yourself, you must add the required DNS resource records that are listed in the following table.

The following table lists the DNS resource records that the server requires for the Internet features to function correctly.

 

Resource Record Name Resource Record Type Resource Record Setting Description

Remote

Host (A)

Static IP address of the Wide Area Network (WAN) side of your router or firewall

Maps your domain name to the WAN IP address (provided by your Internet service provider (ISP)) of your router or software firewall. It is recommended that you lease a static IP address from your ISP.

@

Mail Exchanger (MX)

Remote.contoso.com

Provides e-mail message routing for e-mail@contoso.com to arrive at your Windows SBS 2008 mailboxes.

SPF

Text (TXT)

v=spf1 a mx ~all

Helps prevent e-mail that is sent from your server from being identified as spam.

noteNote
Some domain name providers offer SPF building tools that you can use.

_autodiscover._tcp

Service (SRV)

Service: _autodiscover

Protocol: _tcp

Priority: 0

Weight: 0

Port: 443

Target host: remote.contoso.com

Enables Office Outlook 2007 with Service Pack 1 and Windows Mobile 6.1 to automatically detect and configure Outlook Anywhere (RPC over HTTP).

noteNote
For more information, see “Changes that the IAMW makes” (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=148557).

For more information about the services and features that Windows SBS 2008 provides to help you set up and manage network connectivity, see “Managing Your Windows Small Business Server 2008 Network (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=105270).

Windows Small Business Server 2008 self-issued certificate

The default installation of Windows SBS 2008 configures a self-issued certificate. This certificate makes it possible for remote users to access your organization’s internal Web sites if they install the certificate on their remote computer or device. However, if users try to access your organization’s Web site without installing the certificate, they receive a certificate warning. The warning advises users that the certificate being used to help secure the Web site is not trusted, and therefore the site is not trusted. The user must acknowledge the warning in order to access the Web site.

To give users a better remote access experience, it is recommended that you obtain a trusted certificate from an Internet certificate authority. Domain name providers that partner with Microsoft sell trusted certificates, and you can also purchase a trusted certificate from other providers.

For more information, see Request and install a trusted certificate (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=146721).

Internal Web site

A popular feature in Windows SBS 2008 is the internal Windows SharePoint Services Web site. Users can access this Web site by typing http://companyweb in an Internet browser. The internal Web site is installed and configured when the server tools are installed. By using the internal Web site, network users can share and store many kinds of files, such as documents, presentations, photos, and faxes. Users can also create workspaces where they can work together on specific projects. You can customize the internal Web site by using Web parts. You can also set permissions for users based on pre-set roles that you can associate with user accounts.

For more information, see Managing the Windows Small Business Server 2008 Internal Web Site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=106191).

Remote Web Workplace

Remote Web Workplace is the Web site entrance for local and remote access to the Windows SBS 2008 network. Users can access Remote Web Workplace from within the office and from any remote location with an Internet-enabled computer. After logging on to Remote Web Workplace, users can access network resources, such as e-mail, the internal Web site, applications, and files. The Internet address for Remote Web Workplace is https://FQDN/remote, where FQDN is the fully qualified domain name of the server that is running Windows SBS 2008. Users can also access Remote Web Workplace by using the external IP address for the server.

For more information, see “Managing Windows Small Business Server 2008 Remote Web Workplace” (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=105807).

Integration with Microsoft Office Live Small Business

Microsoft Office Live Small Business is a set of online tools that help you market and manage a business online by using a single account. The Windows SBS Console helps you to set up and manage Office Live Small Business workspaces and a public Web site. After you sign up, Office Live Small Business provides the following:

  • A public Web site that helps you to create a professional online presence by using easy-to-understand Web site tools.

  • A Business Applications Web site that helps you manage information that you use to run a business.

Windows SBS 2008 helps you associate a Windows Live ID with a Microsoft Office Live Small Business account. This enables you to download information about the Web addresses and IP addresses of the Office Live Small Business Web sites. The server then uses this information to configure the DNS records at your domain name provider with the IP addresses of the Office Live Small Business Web sites and to update the Office Live Web site addresses on the server.

By clicking Set up your Office Live Small Business Web sites on the Windows SBS Console home page, you can easily create and integrate Office Live Small Business Web sites with the server, as follows:

  • Create a new Office Live Small Business account, or sign up with an existing Office Live Small Business account.

  • Add links to the Office Live Web sites in the Windows SBS Console, Remote Web Workplace, and the Desktop Links gadget. You can use these links to browse to your Office Live site to view and manage these Web sites from your Windows SBS network.

  • Update DNS settings with your domain name provider if your domain name is managed by a participating domain name partner and if you decide to redirect your domain name to the Web site that is hosted by Office Live.

For more information, see Managing Windows Small Business Server 2008 Office Live Small Business Web sites (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=116317).

Network updates and protection with Windows Small Business Server 2008 Update Services

You can use Windows SBS 2008 Update Services to manage updates for computers on the Windows SBS 2008 network that are running a Windows operating system that Microsoft Update supports. By using Windows SBS 2008 Update Services, you can help protect the Windows SBS 2008 network by keeping computers that are running Windows current with the most recent updates. Windows SBS 2008 Update Services uses Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) 3.0 with Service Pack 1 (SP1) as the underlying technology. The default installation of Windows SBS 2008 automatically enables Windows SBS 2008 Update Services. You can use the WSUS snap-in to do advanced update management.

For more information, see Managing Software Updates in Windows Small Business Server 2008 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=141372).

Security and system health

Windows SBS 2008 includes the following features that help you monitor and manage the health and security of the network.

Network Essentials Summary

The Network Essentials Summary section on the home page in the Windows SBS Console provides an overview of the status of the network. The server assesses each security feature for overall status and displays the information in the Network Essentials Summary. By using the summary, you can quickly determine the status of the network and then click any alert to learn more about the issue and to take action.

Security Status and Information

On the Security tab in the Windows SBS Console, you can view and manage information about the following:

  • Security essentials

    Summary information about features that help provide security functionality for the server and other networked computers. The server assesses each security feature for overall status and displays the information on the Home and the Security tabs of the Windows SBS Console, in the Summary Network Report, and in the Detailed Network Report.

  • Summary protection

    A summary report of the antivirus and antispyware software that is installed on networked computers. This information is displayed in a separate window.

E-Mail Virus and Spam Protection

Virus protection for e-mail helps prevent malicious e-mails from being delivered to users in your organization. Windows SBS 2008 includes a 120-day trial version of Forefront Security for Exchange Server. The trial version of Forefront Security for Exchange Server takes advantage of multiple scan engines from industry-leading security firms to check for viruses, worms, and other inappropriate content. Forefront Security for Exchange Server scans incoming and outgoing e-mail messages. If a scan detects an infected attachment, the attachment is removed and the sender is notified.You can view the overall operational state of Forefront Security for Exchange Server in the Windows SBS Console, both in the Network Essentials Summary (available on the Security tab) and in the Summary and Detailed reports section.

Network alerts

By default, Windows SBS 2008 monitors network services, events, and performance counters that are critical to the functioning of the network. If a monitored activity deviates from the configured value, the server generates an alert and reports the alert in the Network Report. For example, if the threshold value for a monitored performance counter exceeds the maximum value, the server generates an alert. You can use the Windows SBS Console to customize network alerts to suit the needs of the organization.

Reports

Windows SBS 2008 includes a monitoring and reporting feature that you can use to view detailed reports about the status of the network. The reports include the status of security features, updates, alerts, e-mail usage, and server event logs in the Windows SBS 2008 network. Depending on business needs, you can customize the network reports to display items that you prefer to monitor.

By default, Windows SBS 2008 includes two network reports: the Summary Network Report and the Detailed Network Report.These default network reports include information about the following:

  • Security.   The status of the security features that are running on your server and on all of the computers in the network.

  • Updates.   The update compliance, the synchronization status, and the current Group Policy settings for your server and for all of the computers in the network.

  • Backup.   The backup history and results for your server.

  • Other alerts.   The critical alert conditions across the network.

  • E-mail usage.   Incoming and outgoing per-user mail volume and mailbox sizes.

  • Server event logs.   All critical events on the server.

For more information about the security features in Windows SBS 2008, see Managing Network Security in Windows Small Business Server 2008 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=141370).

For more information about Windows SBS 2008 alerts and network reports, see Monitoring in Windows SBS 2008 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=155971).

Backing up and restoring server data

Windows SBS 2008 helps you regularly back up your server to external storage drives. In the event of data loss, you can restore the data from a backup without restoring the entire server.

You can help protect data on the server by running the Windows SBS 2008 Configure Server Backup Wizard. This wizard helps you do the following:

  • Choose the external storage drives where you want to back up your data.

  • Choose whether to back up all the data on the server or only certain drives.

  • Specify a schedule for when you want your backup to run.

After you configure server backup, you can change the configuration by using the Backup and Server Storage task pane on the Windows SBS Console. For example, you can add or remove backup items, and you can change the backup schedule.

For more information, see “Backing Up and Restoring Data on Windows Small Business Server 2008” (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=101616).

Second server

With Windows SBS 2008 Premium, you can add a second server to the network. There are several reasons why you may want to do this, including the following:

  • Offer Terminal Services to network users.   Because you cannot run Terminal Services on the primary server, which is running Windows SBS 2008, small businesses that want to offer Terminal Services to network users must use a second server.

    You can add a server that is running Windows Server to the Windows SBS 2008 network and enable the Terminal Server service role. Network users can then connect to the additional server and have all the functionality of Terminal Services.

  • Provide network redundancy.   You can add a computer that is running Windows Server as an additional domain controller for redundancy in case the server that is running Windows SBS 2008 is unavailable. In a remote office scenario, replication with the server that is running Windows SBS 2008 keeps Active Directory up-to-date on the additional domain controller. In this scenario, users can continue to log on to the network.

  • Run line-of-business (LOB) applications.   You can install LOB applications that cannot or should not run on Windows SBS 2008 on a second server that is running Windows Server and add the second server to the network. Make sure that you comply with the licensing requirements (if any) for the LOB applications. The second server does not require any new licenses for network users to access it.

For more information, see “Implementing a Second Server on Your Windows Small Business Server 2008 Network” (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=104875).

Desktop Links gadget for computers running Windows Vista or Windows 7

Windows SBS 2008 includes a Desktop Links gadget that you can enable for computers that run Windows Vista or Windows 7. You can configure the Desktop Links gadget to display a variety of links that provide quick access to the following:

  • Windows SBS 2008 applications.   These include Outlook Web Access, Remote Web Workplace, and the organization’s internal Web site.

  • Organization links.   These links provide network users with quick access to important server or business resources.

  • Administration links.   These links enable members of the Windows SBS Admin Tools Group security group to remotely manage certain administrator-only tasks.

For more information, see “How does the Desktop Links Gadget work?” (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=155972).

Mobile devices

By deploying devices running Windows Mobile 6 with Windows SBS 2008, mobile employees can access e-mail, calendars, and documents that are stored on the internal Web site. You can also manage mobile devices as if they were on the local network, installing certificates or remotely wiping devices for security reasons. To deploy devices running Windows Mobile 6 with your Windows SBS 2008 network, you must first install the following server-side features:

  • Exchange Server ActiveSync Web Administration tool

  • A third-party trusted certificate or a self-issued certificate

For more information, see “Deploying Windows Mobile 6 with Windows Small Business Server 2008” (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=132513).

Server virtualization

One way that you can optimize your server that is running Windows SBS 2008 is by using the Hyper-V virtualization technology. With Hyper-V, you can run multiple operating systems at the same time as virtual machines on a single physical server. Virtualization offers you the following benefits:

  • Server consolidation.   You can use Hyper-V to consolidate multiple servers onto a single physical server, and at the same time keep them isolated from each other. This way, you can use your hardware more efficiently and you can lower your management costs, effectively lowering your total cost of ownership (TCO).

  • Lower power costs.   With virtualization, you can lower your power and cooling costs.

  • Business continuity and disaster recovery.   You can use Windows SBS 2008 to regularly back up your servers to external storage drives. You can use these backups to fully restore the primary server. Servers that are virtualized with Hyper-V offer a degree of hardware independence, and they include additional options that can help speed server recovery in the event of an outage. Some of these options require either server clustering or additional monitoring software. However, you may be able to use the hardware independence aspect of virtualization to decrease server downtime.

For more information about how to deploy Windows SBS 2008 in a virtualized environment, see “Using Hyper-V with Windows Small Business Server 2008” (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=124858).

For more information about Hyper-V, see the Microsoft Virtualization Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=127022) and the Windows Server 2008 TechCenter (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=127023).

Additional references

For more information about technical resources for Windows SBS 2008, see the Windows Small Business Server 2008 Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=132943).

For the latest product documentation for Windows SBS 2008, see the Windows Small Business Server 2008 Technical Library (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=108272).

For more information about the community for Windows SBS 2008, see the Windows Small Business Server Community Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=111140).

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