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Windows Server Migration Common Tasks and Information

Updated: February 10, 2010

Applies To: Windows Server 2008 R2

Administrators can use Windows Server Migration Tools to migrate server roles, features, shares, operating system settings, and other data to computers that are running Windows Server® 2008 R2. This document provides supplemental information about how to work with the Windows PowerShell cmdlets that make up Windows Server Migration Tools, and how to open and close Windows® Firewall ports.

noteNote
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Information in this guide is most likely to benefit administrators who are performing migrations of any of the following.

  • BranchCache. For detailed information about how to migrate BranchCache, see the BranchCache Migration Guide (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=139091).

  • Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) Server. For detailed information about how to migrate DHCP Server, see the DHCP Server Migration Guide (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=134770).

  • File Services. For detailed information about how to migrate File Services, see the File Services Migration Guide (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=128746).

  • Hyper-V™. For detailed information about how to migrate Hyper-V, see the Hyper-V Migration Guide (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=156766).

  • IP configuration. For detailed information about how to migrate IP configuration data, see the IP Configuration Migration Guide (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=128513).

  • Local users and groups. For detailed information about how to migrate local user and group data, see the Local User and Group Migration Guide (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=128751).

  • Routing and Remote Access Services (RRAS). For detailed information about how to migrate RRAS, see the Routing and Remote Access Services Migration Guide (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=156774).

  • Windows Server Update Services (WSUS). For detailed information about how to migrate WSUS, see the Windows Server Update Services 3.0 SP2 Migration Guide (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=156772).

Other guides and migration information are available on the Windows Server Migration Portal (http://www.microsoft.com/migration).

The following instructions are for opening ports in Windows Firewall. If your installed firewall is not a Microsoft® firewall, look in your guide about how to open firewall ports. Opening ports in Windows Firewall can be done through the command interface.

ImportantImportant
Opening ports in your firewall can leave the server exposed to malicious attacks. Make sure that you understand firewall systems before you open ports.

  1. Open a Command Prompt window with elevated user rights, type the following, and then press ENTER.

    • On computers that are running Windows Server 2003, type:

      netsh firewall add allowedprogram program=%windir%\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\powershell.exe name="ServerMigration" mode=ENABLE
      
    • On computers that are running Windows Server® 2008 or Windows Server 2008 R2, type the following commands, in order, pressing ENTER after each command.

      1. netsh advfirewall firewall add rule name=ServerMigration(TCP-In) dir=in program=%windir%\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\powershell.exe action=allow protocol=TCP localport=7000
        
      2. netsh advfirewall firewall add rule name=ServerMigration(UDP-In) dir=in program=%windir%\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\powershell.exe action=allow protocol=UDP localport=7000
        
  2. If you have changed the default behavior of Windows Firewall to block all outgoing traffic on computers that are running Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2008 R2, you must explicitly enable outgoing traffic on UDP port 7000. To do this, open a Command Prompt window with elevated user rights, type the following, and then press ENTER.

    netsh advfirewall firewall add rule name=ServerMigration(UDP-Out) dir=out program=%windir%\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\powershell.exe action=allow protocol=UDP localport=7000
    

As a best practice, we recommend that you close Windows Firewall ports after the data transfer operation is finished.

  • On computers that are running Windows Server 2003, open a Command Prompt window, type the following, and then press ENTER.

    netsh firewall delete allowedprogram program=%windir%\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\powershell.exe
    
  • On computers that are running Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2008 R2, open a Command Prompt window with elevated user rights, type the following two commands. Press ENTER after each.

    netsh advfirewall firewall delete rule name=ServerMigration(TCP-In)
    
    netsh advfirewall firewall delete rule name=ServerMigration(UDP-Out)
    

Cmdlets (pronounced command-lets) are built-in commands included with Windows PowerShell, installed by default as part of Windows Server 2008 R2. For more information about Windows PowerShell and how cmdlets work, see Windows PowerShell on the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=122931).

Except where specifically noted, Windows PowerShell cmdlets are not case-sensitive.

You can obtain detailed Help about specific syntax, parameters, and usage guidelines for any installed Windows PowerShell cmdlet by typing Get-Help <cmdlet_name> -full in a Windows PowerShell session, in which cmdlet_name represents the name of the cmdlet for which you want help.

On computers that are running Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows PowerShell cmdlets that are part of Windows Server Migration Tools must be run in a Windows PowerShell session that was opened with elevated user rights. To do this, click Start, click All Programs, click Accessories, click Windows PowerShell, right-click the Windows PowerShell shortcut, and then click Run as administrator. You do not have to open a Windows PowerShell session with elevated user rights to run Windows Server Migration Tools on Windows Server 2003.

Although most commands for migration are Windows PowerShell cmdlets, you can run executable files in a Windows PowerShell session by adding an ampersand (&) before the executable file name. The ampersand is the call operator in Windows PowerShell.

If the executable file is not in the current directory, add the fully qualified path, as shown in the following examples. If an executable file name contains spaces, enclose the file name in quotation marks. If you are running the executable file from the current directory, precede the file name with .\.

  • Executable file that is not in the current directory: PS C:\> & C:\Windows\System32\notepad.exe

  • Executable file that is in the current directory: PS C:\Windows\System32> & .\notepad.exe

  • Executable file name that contains a space and is in the current directory: PS C:\Windows\System32> & ".\executable test.exe"

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