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Exchange Server 2007 and Exchange Server 2003/Exchange 2000 Server Systems Management Co-existence

 

Topic Last Modified: 2011-06-16

If you have an existing organization that includes Exchange 2000 and Microsoft Exchange Server 2003, you can install Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 in the organization.

noteNote:
In this topic, the Exchange 2000 and Exchange 2003 organization are called "Exchange 2003." The name Exchange 2000 Server is used only when behavior that is specific to Exchange 2000 Server is discussed.

When Microsoft Exchange is installed in the organization, the organization is considered in a co-existence or "Interop" (interoperability) state. This is one step in the migration process.

When the organization is in the co-existence state, you must be aware of the management behavior of Exchange 2003 and Microsoft Exchange. In this topic, we discuss when you must use the management tools for Exchange 2003, when you must use the management tools for Microsoft Exchange must be used, and when you can use the tools for one program to manage the other.

Mailbox management is completed in Exchange 2003 by using the Active Directory Users and Computers (ADUC) snap-in extension for Microsoft Exchange . In Microsoft Exchange, mailbox management is completed by using the Exchange Management Shell or the Exchange Management Console. When the organization is in a co-existence state, both management tools are present. Microsoft Exchange does not install the Microsoft Exchange extensions for ADUC. However, any Exchange 2003 servers or "admin-only" installations that remain in the organization still have this snap-in available for use.

To determine which tools to use on which objects, use the following guidelines:

  • Microsoft Exchange mailboxes must be managed by using the Exchange Management Console or the Exchange Management Shell.
  • Do not manage Microsoft Exchange mailboxes by using the Exchange 2003 management tools. Using the Exchange 2003 tools is not blocked when you try to manage Microsoft Exchange mailboxes. However, Microsoft Exchange mailboxes that are managed from Exchange 2003 ADUC are not fully functional.
  • Exchange 2003 mailboxes can be edited or removed by using the Microsoft Exchange management tools. However, you cannot create an Exchange 2003 mailbox by using the Microsoft Exchange tools.
  • Exchange 2003 mailboxes can be managed by using the Exchange 2003 management tools.
  • The Exchange 2003 move mailbox command cannot be used to move mailboxes to or from an Microsoft Exchange mailbox server. However, Exchange 2003 mailboxes and Microsoft Exchange mailboxes can be moved (in either direction) by using the Microsoft Exchange management tools.

A Dynamic Distribution List (DDL) that is created by using the Microsoft Exchange management tools stores its RecipientFilter filter in the OPATH filtering syntax. DDLs that are created by using the Exchange 2003 management tools store the filter in the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) filtering syntax. Therefore, after you set a DDL filter in Microsoft Exchange, you must modify the DDL by using the Microsoft Exchange management tools.

noteNote:
DDL is also known as Dynamic Distribution Groups (DDG).

Other recipient objects, such as contacts and groups, are unlike a mailbox and a DDL because they are not tied to a particular Microsoft Exchange version. These recipient objects can be managed by using either the Exchange 2003 or Microsoft Exchange management tools. However, for best results, we recommend that you consistently use the Microsoft Exchange management tools to manage these recipient objects. This is because the Microsoft Exchange management tools can access the full set of Microsoft Exchange properties and validation rules.

There are many global configuration objects that are shared between Exchange 2003 and Microsoft Exchange when they run in a co-existence state. Examples of these objects are the Address List, the E-mail Address Policy, and the Offline Address Book.

Typically, these global objects can be fully modified only in Exchange 2003 if they are created in Exchange 2003. This is true until the objects are upgraded to the Microsoft Exchange format. After that upgrade, the objects cannot be modified by Exchange 2003. Also, objects that are created in Microsoft Exchange cannot be modified in Exchange 2003. The Exchange 2003 system manager blocks modifications after the object is upgraded to Microsoft Exchange.

Do not configure an Microsoft Exchange -based server as the "Exchange Server" for a Recipient Update Service (RUS). Doing this causes the RUS to stop functioning. For more information about RUS and about Microsoft Exchange, see the Exchange Server Team Blog article Goodbye RUS.

noteNote:
The content of each blog and its URL are subject to change without notice.

You should not use the Exchange 2003 management tools to manage Microsoft Exchange servers or Microsoft Exchange versioned objects. When it is possible, Microsoft Exchange objects are "blocked" from editing by using the Exchange 2003 tools. However, several Microsoft Exchange objects are visible in the Exchange 2003 management tools. For example, the Microsoft Exchange administrative and routing groups are visible. Similarly, the Microsoft Exchange server object (and storage groups, databases, protocols, and so on) are also visible in Exchange 2003.

In the Microsoft Exchange management tools, some objects are hidden. For example, the Account Group/Resource Group (AG/RG) method is completely hidden in Microsoft Exchange. Some Exchange 2003 objects are not hidden or blocked in the Microsoft Exchange management tools, but are nonfunctional. Deprecated items, such as the monitoring administration and the Exchange 2003 queue viewer, remain visible. However, if you try to connect to the interface to access these items, you receive an error.

The Exchange 2003 management tools are currently the only way to manage specific objects. This will remain true until a replacement graphical user interface (GUI) is established in Microsoft Exchange. For example, two items that must be managed by using the Exchange 2003 management tools are the Public Folder GUI (which remains functional and supported if an Exchange 2003 server is the targeted public folder store) and the Address/Details template customization GUI. In these cases, the Exchange 2003 GUI will likely be replaced by an Microsoft Exchange GUI in the future.

If your organization includes Exchange 2000, the Exchange 2000 System Manager does not block the editing of Microsoft Exchange objects in the manner that Exchange 2003 does, unless you install a post-SP3 hotfix to provide this same behavior. If this hotfix is not installed on an Exchange 2000 admin console that is used to manage Microsoft Exchange objects, the Microsoft Exchange objects may be modified incorrectly.

Exchange 2000 Server Service Pack 3 (SP3) is a prerequisite to set up Microsoft Exchange. However, you must make sure that all Exchange 2000 servers and all Exchange 2000 admin tools-only consoles also include the roll-up hotfix that is described in Microsoft Knowledge Base article 870540, Availability of the August 2004 Exchange 2000 Server Post-Service Pack 3 Update Rollup.

 
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