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Release Notes for Exchange Server 2010 SP1

Exchange 2010
 

Applies to: Exchange Server 2010 SP1

Topic Last Modified: 2011-04-19

For important legal information, see Legal Notice later in this document.

Welcome to Microsoft Exchange Server 2010. This document contains the following sections:

Exchange 2010 Service Pack 1 (SP1) adds new and revised functionality. For more information, see What's New in Exchange 2010 SP1.

Consider the following when you deploy Exchange 2010 SP1:

  • You can now select a new option that installs the required Microsoft Windows operating system roles and features for each selected Exchange 2010 SP1 server role.
  • You can only install Exchange 2010 SP1 on computers running Windows Server 2008 Service Pack 2 (SP2) and Windows Server 2008 R2.
  • Although it isn't a recommended configuration, single-label Domain Name System (DNS) domain names are now supported for use with Exchange 2010 SP1.
  • If you're running the beta release of Exchange 2010, you must uninstall the beta release before you install the SP1 version of Exchange 2010.
  • If you upgrade an Edge Transport server that's running Forefront Threat Management Gateway (TMG) and has Forefront Protection for Exchange Server (FPE) enabled for SMTP protection, the Forefront TMG Managed Control service may fail to start.

For detailed information about the requirements and steps for installing Exchange 2010 SP1, see the following topics:

The process for moving mailboxes has changed to help make sure that no data is unintentionally lost due to issues that may occur around the same time as a move, such as a lossy failover on the target database.

When mailboxes are moved from an Exchange 2010 SP1 database to any other database, Exchange no longer fully deletes the mailbox from the source database immediately upon completion of the move. Instead, the mailbox in the source mailbox database is switched to a soft-deleted state, which allows mailbox data to be accessed during a mailbox restore operation by using the new MailboxRestoreRequest set of cmdlets.

These soft-deleted mailboxes are visible when running the Get-MailboxStatistics cmdlet against a database and can be identified by having the property DisconnectReason with a value of SoftDeleted. The soft-deleted mailboxes will be retained in the source database until either the deleted mailbox retention period expires or the mailbox is purged by using the Remove-StoreMailbox cmdlet. As a result of this change, if you're performing mailbox moves to reduce the amount of space being used in a database, you must also perform the additional step of purging the soft-deleted mailbox. Soft-deleted mailboxes can't be reconnected.

noteNote:
You won’t be able to view soft-deleted mailboxes by using the Get-MailboxStatistics cmdlet in Exchange versions earlier than Exchange 2010 SP1.

If necessary, you can restore data from these soft-deleted mailboxes by using the MailboxRestoreRequest set of cmdlets, which is initiated with the New-MailboxRestoreRequest cmdlet. The MailboxRestoreRequest cmdlets replace the legacy Restore-Mailbox cmdlet. In addition to having the same capabilities as the Restore-Mailbox cmdlet, the MailboxRestoreRequest cmdlets perform additional tasks, including the ability to:

  • Restore from rehomed or soft-deleted mailboxes that aren't in a recovery database.
  • Be processed asynchronously (like a mailbox move in Exchange 2010).
  • Restore data into an archive mailbox.

The following are known issues associated with mailbox moves.

An Exchange 2010 SP1 change to the Mailbox Replication Proxy (MRSProxy) service requires you to apply a Microsoft .NET Framework hotfix before you can move mailboxes across forests. If you don't apply the .NET Framework hotfix, you may receive transient exceptions on the remote forest due to MRSProxy failures, which leads to a series of "another administrator is moving the mailbox" error messages. Sometimes, the move request recovers and retries the move, but eventually the move will fail due to too many transient failures. In Event Viewer on the Client Access server, you will receive an error message similar to the following:

Log Name: Application

Source:.NET Runtime

Date:6/14/2010 3:56:55 PM

Event ID: 1023

Task Category: None

Level: Error

Keywords: Classic

User: N/A

Computer:      CAS01.contoso.com

Description: .NET Runtime version 2.0.50727.4200 - Fatal Execution Engine Error (000007FEF884664E) (80131506)

You need to apply the hotfix to all Exchange 2010 SP1 Client Access servers in both forests. For more information about this hotfix and how to download it, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 971030, FIX: An access violation occurs when you run a .NET Framework 2.0-based application that has a virtual call the IList<T>, IEnumerable<T>, or ICollection<T> interface in an LCG method.

When performing a cross-forest mailbox move, the Exchange 2010 RTM version of the Microsoft Exchange Mailbox Replication service (MRS) and the MRSProxy service can't log into an Exchange 2010 SP1 Mailbox server. This functionality is intentional. It prevents errors when moving mailboxes across Exchange versions to provide for new functionality such as soft-deletes. To prevent this issue from occurring, you can do one of the following:

  • Make sure that all Client Access servers in the remote and local forests are running the same or a later version of Exchange than the Mailbox servers in the remote and local forests.
  • In the remote forest, make sure you haven't mixed Exchange servers of different versions behind the same network load balancer (NLB) end point.
  • Initiate cross-forest moves from the later version of Exchange.

In the RTM version of Exchange 2010, when you move a mailbox across forests, the source mailbox is converted to a mail-enabled user. If the mailbox has a personal archive, after the move is complete, the msExchArchiveDatabaseLink attribute isn't cleared from the mail-enabled user in the source forest, and the new mailbox in the target forest also gets this attribute stamped with the database in which the archive now resides. If this attribute is present on the mail-enabled user, it will point to a database in the source forest.

As a result, when you upgrade to Exchange 2010 SP1, Autodiscover and Outlook can't determine where the mailbox resides because the mail-enabled user object and the mailbox object are pointing to different databases within different forests.

Therefore, before you upgrade to Exchange 2010 SP1, you must clear the msExchArchiveDatabaseLink attribute manually from Active Directory for each affected mail-enabled user. You can use a tool such as ADSIEdit to remove this property. For more information, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 2387770, When using Autodiscover Outlook fails to connect to an Exchange 2010 SP1 mailbox with "Unable to open your default e-mail folders" if the user was moved cross forest.

Consider the following issues when you install and configure Exchange 2010 SP1 with Unified Messaging.

The Unified Messaging (UM) language packs for Exchange 2010 SP1 are intended to be used only on Unified Messaging servers running Exchange 2010 SP1. They must not be installed on 64-bit Unified Messaging servers running the release to manufacturing (RTM) version of Exchange 2010.

These new UM language packs allow a Unified Messaging server running Exchange 2010 SP1 to speak additional languages to callers and recognize other languages when callers use Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) or when voice messages are transcribed. UM language packs contain:

  • Prerecorded prompts, for example: "After the tone, please record your message. When you've finished recording, hang up, or press the # key for more options." These prompts are in the language of the UM language pack.
  • Text-to-Speech (TTS) data and executable code so that text content (such as e-mail, calendar, and contact information) can be read to callers in the language of the UM language pack.
  • ASR data and executable code, which allows callers to interact with Unified Messaging using the voice user interface (Outlook Voice Access) in the language of the UM language pack.
  • Support for Voice Mail Preview, which adds a text version of voice mail messages that can be read from e-mail clients such as Microsoft Outlook or Microsoft Office Outlook Web App. The Voice Mail Preview feature isn't available in all UM language packs.

The following is a list of UM language packs in Exchange 2010 SP1 that contain support for Voice Mail Preview. The language packs marked with an asterisk (*) are new in SP1:

  • English (United States) (en-US)
  • English (Canada) (en-CA) *
  • French (France) (fr-FR)
  • Italian (Italy) (it-IT)
  • Polish (pl-PL) *
  • Portuguese (Portugal) (pt-PT) *
  • Spanish (Spain) (es-ES) *

The following are known issues associated with UM language packs:

  • Installation issues
    When you're installing a UM language pack, you may encounter the following error message: "This specified role, UmLanguagePack, isn't defined in the configuration file." To work around the problem, you can delete the C:\Program Files\Microsoft\Exchange Server\V14\Bin\en\ExBPA.Config.xml file, and then restart the language pack installation.
  • General recommendations and considerations when you're using UM language packs for name pronunciation. The following issues are associated with name pronunciation:
    • The actual names should be recorded by UM-enabled users when they're setting up their voice mail (signing in to Outlook Voice Access for the first time).
    • If a recorded name is available, it will always be spoken to a caller by Unified Messaging.
    • If a recorded name isn't available, Unified Messaging will try to speak the user's display name phonetically. This requires the Unified Messaging server to use TTS synthesis to speak the user's name.
    • If a phonetic display name isn't available for the user, Unified Messaging will try to speak the user's display name. This also requires TTS synthesis.
    • The problems (described later in this document) with the pronunciation of names refer to the cases in which a recorded name or phonetic display name is used by a Unified Messaging server to speak the name of the user.
  • Language-specific issues. Some language packs may have problems with the pronunciation of names. The following problems are listed by language pack:
    • Japanese
      In the case of some Romaji names (Japanese names spelled using Roman characters), instead of pronouncing the name in its entirety, Unified Messaging may read the name spelled out letter-by-letter, for example, instead of "Sugimoto," Unified Messaging may read "s-u-g-i-m-o-t-o."
      In addition, Unified Messaging may not read English names spelled out using Roman characters, remaining silent in place of a name.
    • Russian
      Some Romanized Russian names, as well as English names, might be pronounced in an unnatural manner.
    • English (India)
      While attempting to switch the language used to read e-mail messages in Outlook Voice Access, Unified Messaging may not recognize the name of the requested culture. To work around this issue, try to use alternative names, for example, instead of "Chinese," use "Chinese P.R.C." or "Chinese Hong Kong."
      CautionCaution:
      Deploying the Exchange 2010 SP1 English (India) (en-IN) Unified Messaging language pack in organizations that include Exchange Server 2007 servers running on Windows Server 2003 will cause the Exchange 2007 servers to fail.
    • English (US)
      Unified Messaging may not pronounce names written with characters from non-Roman alphabets.
    • Chinese (Hong Kong)
      Unified Messaging may not pronounce names written using characters from alphabets other than Chinese (H.K.).
    • Danish
      When reporting hours, Unified Messaging may unnecessarily repeat the word "klokken," for example, "ankom I går klokken klokken 8:21."

You can use the Test-ExchangeUMCallFlow cmdlet to test call flow between Unified Messaging servers, IP gateways, and Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) servers. This cmdlet can be used to diagnose configuration errors found in telephony components, Exchange 2010 SP1 Unified Messaging settings, and connectivity issues between on-premises and cross-premises Unified Messaging deployments.

The Test-ExchangeUMCallFlow cmdlet can also be used to diagnose configuration errors specific to call answering scenarios and to test whether voice mail is functioning correctly, both on-premises and cross-premises, for the following:

  • Deployments that use Microsoft Office Communications Server 2007 R2 or Microsoft Lync Server 2010
  • Deployments that aren't using Communications Server 2007 R2 or Lync Server 2010

This cmdlet emulates calls and runs a series of diagnostic tests that provide reasons, and possible solutions, for issues that are detected. It also provides metrics for diagnosing audio quality issues related to network connectivity, such as jitter and average packet loss. The Test-ExchangeUMCallFlow cmdlet supports testing Unified Messaging components Secured, SIP Secured, and Unsecured modes and can be run either in Gateway or SIPClient modes.

importantImportant:
The Test-ExchangeUMCallFlow cmdlet must be used to test only the voice mail functionality of an Exchange 2010 Unified Messaging server that has Exchange 2010 SP1 installed.

The Test-ExchangeUMCallFlow cmdlet can be installed on a local Unified Messaging server or on another 64-bit computer that's running the:

  • Windows Vista or Windows 7 operating system.
  • Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2008 R2 operating system.

The Test-ExchangeUMCallFlow cmdlet requires that the components in the following list be installed on a computer running Windows Vista, Windows 7, or the 64-bit version of Windows Server 2008 before the cmdlet is installed:

The Test-ExchangeUMCallFlow cmdlet isn't included on the Exchange 2010 SP1 DVD or in the download for Exchange 2010 SP1 only. However, you can download the Test-ExchangeUMCallFlow cmdlet from the Microsoft Download Center. For details, see Unified Messaging Troubleshooting Tool.

importantImportant:
The Diversion parameter in the UM troubleshooting tool doesn't currently accept multiple History-Info headers. When you're running the tool in Gateway mode, the Diversion parameter must be provided. This can be in the form of a Diversion or a History-Info header. When you specify diversion numbers using History-Info headers, Unified Communications Managed API 2.0 requires that at least two History-Info headers be provided. For example: "<sip:66242@10.197.22.149;user=phone >; index=1, \ < sip:66242@10.197.22.149?Reason=SIP; cause=480; \ text="Request Timeout">;index=1.1, \ ;index=1.2"

Office Communications Server 2007 R2 or Microsoft Lync Server 2010 (the next generation of Office Communications Server) is required with Unified Messaging in Exchange 2010 SP1. The following table describes supported deployments.

Supported deployments

Office Communications Server or Lync Server version Exchange Server 2007 SP1, SP2, or SP3 Unified Messaging. Exchange 2010 RTM Unified Messaging. Exchange 2010 SP1 Unified Messaging.

Office Communications Server 2007

Supported only in an enterprise deployment. Location profile names and UM dial plan phone contexts must match.

Supported only in an enterprise deployment. Location profile names and UM dial plan phone contexts must match.

Not supported.

Office Communications Server 2007 R2

Supported only in an enterprise deployment. Location profile names and UM dial plan phone contexts must match.

Supported only in an enterprise deployment. Location profile names and UM dial plan phone contexts must match.

Supported only in an enterprise deployment. Location profile names and UM dial plan phone contexts don't have to match.

Lync Server 2010

Supported only in an enterprise deployment. Location profile names and UM dial plan phone contexts must match.

Supported only in an enterprise deployment. Location profile names and UM dial plan phone contexts must match.

Supported in a cross-premises or enterprise deployment. Location profile names and UM dial plan phone contexts don't have to match.

noteNote:
Exchange 2010 SP1 Unified Messaging no longer supports Office Communications Server 2007. You must use Office Communications Server 2007 R2 or Lync Server 2010.

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