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Create a new local area network (LAN)

Published: June 9, 2010

Updated: June 9, 2010

Applies To: Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2

You can use the goals below to determine your preferred method for creating a new network.

To accomplish this goal, you can deploy Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS) and install a new domain in a new forest. AD DS stores directory data and manages communication between users and domains, including user logon processes, authentication, and directory searches. An Active Directory domain controller is a server that is running AD DS.

You can select one of the goals below based on the operating system that you plan to use.

To accomplish this goal, you can deploy AD DS, Domain Name System (DNS), and Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP). For more information, see Windows Server 2008 R2 Core Network Guide at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=187534.

To accomplish this goal, you can deploy AD DS, DNS, and DHCP. For more information, see Windows Server 2008 Foundation Network Guide at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=187532.

To accomplish this goal, you must make several goal decisions. A workgroup-based network does not include a central user accounts database, centralized authentication, or any of the other benefits provided by AD DS. The goal decision points that you must make are:

  1. Choose an Internet Protocol for your network

  2. Choose manual or automatic configuration of IP addresses on your network

  3. Choose a computer name-to-IP address resolution method

You can use Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) version 4 or Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) to assign Internet Protocol (IP) addresses to computers on the network. In most cases, using TCP/IP v4 is recommended if you are deploying a private network. Many applications and services that are not included with Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2008 R2 require TCP/IP v4 to function correctly. You can use the goals below to determine the IP version that you want to use on your network.

noteNote
In some circumstances, you might want to create a network that uses both IPv4 and IPv6. Review the documentation for these technologies to determine whether using both of these Internet Protocols is required to accomplish your goals.

  • Allow computers, services, and applications to use standard Internet protocols on a private network

    To accomplish this goal, see IP version 4 (IPv4) at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=193992.

  • Create a network where IPv6 is the exclusive Internet protocol used between computers

    To accomplish this goal, see IP Version 6 (IPv6) at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=187529.

Manually configure TCP/IP connections on all computers with IP addresses and other settings or use automatic IP address allocation with Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP). You can use the goals below to determine the way to provide IP addresses to computers on your network.

  • Manually configure TCP/IP settings on individual computers.

    To accomplish this goal, you need to select an IP address range, decide on additional parameters for settings, and then configure network connections on individual computers. For more information, see Choosing Public or Private Addresses at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=193979.

  • Automatically configure TCP/IP settings on all computers.

    To accomplish this goal, you need to select an IP address range, decide on additional parameters for settings, and then deploy Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP). For more information, see Checklist: Deploying DHCP Server at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=193980.

Manually configure computer name to IP address mappings on each computer or provide automatic computer name-to-IP address resolution with either Domain Name System (DNS) or Windows Internet Name Service (WINS). In most cases, the ease of installation and operation of DNS or WINS on small networks is preferable to the difficulty of configuring and managing name-to-IP address mappings in individual hosts or LAN Manager hosts (lmhosts) files on each computer. If you are choosing between DNS and WINS, DNS is recommended because it provides the ability for you to scale your network, and because WINS is legacy technology that will eventually be retired from use. You can use the goals below to determine the way to provide a name resolution method for computers on your network.

  • Configure automatic computer name-to-IP address mapping with DNS.

    To accomplish this goal, you must deploy a DNS server and configure computers so that they can locate the DNS server. For more information, see Adding a DNS server at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=193981.

  • Configure automatic computer name-to-IP address mapping with WINS.

    To accomplish this goal, you must deploy a WINS server and configure computers so that they can locate the WINS server. For more information, see Deploying WINS at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=193983.

  • Create a text file that contains computer name to IP address mappings on each computer.

    Before selecting this goal, ensure that the operating system you’re using on each computer supports the use of hosts or lmhosts files. To accomplish this goal, you must create one lmhosts file on each computer on the network. For more information, see LMHOSTS File Information and Predefined Keywords at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=187630.

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