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Specify a Breakpoint Action

A breakpoint When Hit action specifies a custom task that the Transact-SQL debugger performs for a breakpoint. If the specified hit count is reached and any specified breakpoint condition is satisfied, the debugger performs the action specified for the breakpoint.

The default action for a breakpoint is to break execution when both the hit count and breakpoint condition have been satisfied. The primary use of a When Hit action in the Transact-SQL debugger is to instead print information to the debugger Output window by specifying a print message.

A print message is specified in the Print a Message option, and is specified as a text string that includes expressions containing information from the Transact-SQL being debugged. Expressions include:

  • A Transact-SQL expression contained in curly braces ({}). The expressions can include Transact-SQL variables, parameters, and built-in functions. Examples include {@MyVariable}, {@NameParameter}, {@@SPID}, or {SERVERPROPERTY(‘ProcessID’)}.

  • One of the following keywords:

    1. $ADDRESS returns the name of the stored procedure or user-defined function where the breakpoint is set. If the breakpoint is set in the editor window, $ADDRESS returns the name of the script file being edited. $ADDRESS and $FUNCTION return the same information in the Transact-SQL debugger.

    2. $CALLER returns the name of the unit of Transact-SQL code that called a stored procedure or function. If the breakpoint is in the editor window, $CALLER returns <No caller available>. If the breakpoint is in a stored procedure or user-defined function called from the code in the editor window, $CALLER returns the name of the file being edited. If the breakpoint is in a stored procedure or user-defined function called from another stored procedure or function, $CALLER returns the name of the calling procedure or function.

    3. $CALLSTACK returns the call stack of functions in the chain that called the current stored procedure or user-defined function. If the breakpoint is in the editor window, $CALLSTACK returns the name of the script file being edited.

    4. $FUNCTION returns the name of the stored procedure or user-defined function where the breakpoint is set. If the breakpoint is set in the editor window, $FUNCTION returns the name of the script file being edited.

    5. $PID and $PNAME return the ID and name of the operating system process running the instance of the Database Engine where the Transact-SQL is running. $PID returns the same ID as SERVERPROPERTY(‘ProcessID’), except that $PID is a hexadecimal value while SERVERPROPERTY(‘ProcessID’) is a decimal value.

    6. $TID and $TNAME return the ID and name of the operating system thread running the Transact-SQL batch. The thread is one associated with the process running the instance of the Database Engine. $TID returns the same value as SELECT kpid FROM sys.sysprocesses WHERE spid = @@SPID, except that $TID is a hexadecimal value while kpid is a decimal value.

  • You can also use the backslash character (\) as an escape character to allow curly braces and backslashes in the message: \{, \}, and \\.

To Specify a When Hit Action

  1. In the editor window, right-click the breakpoint glyph, and then click When Hit on the shortcut menu.

    -or-

    In the Breakpoints window, right-click the breakpoint glyph, and then click When hit on the shortcut menu.

  2. In the When Breakpoint Is Hit dialog box, select the behavior you want:

    1. Select Print a Message to print a message in the debugger Output window when the breakpoint is hit.

    2. The Run a Macro option is not available from the Transact-SQL debugger, and is greyed out.

    3. Select Continue execution if you do not want the breakpoint to pause execution. This option is active only if you have selected the Print a Message option.

  3. Click OK to implement the changes, or Cancel to exit without applying the changes.

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