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Remove-CsHealthMonitoringConfiguration

 

Topic Last Modified: 2012-03-26

Removes an existing collection of health monitoring configuration settings. These settings enable administrators to run quality assurance tests without having to supply the user names and passwords for the required test accounts.

Remove-CsHealthMonitoringConfiguration -Identity <XdsGlobalRelativeIdentity> [-Confirm [<SwitchParameter>]] [-Force <SwitchParameter>] [-WhatIf [<SwitchParameter>]]

Synthetic transactions are used in Microsoft Lync Server 2010 to verify that users are able to successfully complete common tasks such as logging on to the system, exchanging instant messages, or making calls to a phone located on the public switched telephone network (PSTN). These tests can be conducted manually by an administrator, or they can be automatically run by an application such as Microsoft System Center Operations Manager (formerly Microsoft Operations Manager).

Synthetic transactions can be conducted in two different ways. Many administrators will use the CsHealthMonitoringConfiguration cmdlets to set up test accounts for each of their Registrar pools. These test accounts are a pair of user accounts that have been preconfigured for use with synthetic transactions. (Typically these are test accounts and not accounts that belong to actual users.) When these test accounts are configured for a pool, administrators can run a synthetic transaction against that pool without having to specify the identities of (and supply the credentials for) the user accounts involved in the test. Instead, the synthetic transaction will automatically use the preconfigured test accounts when performing its checks.

Alternatively, administrators can run a synthetic transaction using actual user accounts. For example, if two users are unable to exchange instant messages, an administrator can run a synthetic transaction using the two user accounts in question (as opposed to a pair of test accounts). If you decide to conduct a synthetic transaction using actual user accounts you will have to supply the credentials for each user.

The Remove-CsHealthMonitoringConfiguration cmdlet provides a way for you to remove any of the health monitoring configuration settings that have been configured for use in your organization.

Who can run this cmdlet: By default, members of the following groups are authorized to run the Remove-CsHealthMonitoringConfiguration cmdlet locally: RTCUniversalServerAdmins. To return a list of all the role-based access control (RBAC) roles this cmdlet has been assigned to (including any custom RBAC roles you have created yourself), run the following command from the Windows PowerShell prompt:

Get-CsAdminRole | Where-Object {$_.Cmdlets –match "Remove-CsHealthMonitoringConfiguration"}

 

Parameter Required Type Description

Identity

Required

Xds Identity

Fully qualified domain name (FQDN) of the pool hosting the health monitoring configuration settings that are to be deleted. For example: -Identity atl-cs-001.litwareinc.com.

Force

Optional

Switch Parameter

Suppresses the display of any non-fatal error message that might occur when running the command.

WhatIf

Optional

Switch Parameter

Describes what would happen if you executed the command without actually executing the command.

Confirm

Optional

Switch Parameter

Prompts you for confirmation before executing the command.

Microsoft.Rtc.Management.WritableConfig.Settings.HealthMonitoring.HealthMonitoringSettings object. Remove-CsHealthMonitoringConfiguration accepts pipelined instances of the health monitoring configuration object.

None. Instead, Remove-CsHealthMonitoringConfiguration deletes existing instances of the Microsoft.Rtc.Management.WritableConfig.Settings.HealthMonitoring.HealthMonitoringSettings object.

-------------------------- Example 1 ------------------------

Remove-CsHealthMonitoringConfiguration -Identity atl-cs-001.litwareinc.com

The command shown in Example 1 deletes the collection of health monitoring configuration settings with the Identity atl-cs-001.litwareinc.com. Because identities must be unique, this command will delete, at most, a single collection of settings.

-------------------------- Example 2 ------------------------

Get-CsHealthMonitoringConfiguration | Remove-CsHealthMonitoringConfiguration 

Example 2 deletes all the health monitoring configuration settings currently in use. To do this, the command first calls Get-CsHealthMonitoringConfiguration without any parameters; this returns a collection of all the health monitoring configuration settings in the organization. This collection is then piped to Remove-CsHealthMonitoringConfiguration, which deletes each item in the collection.

-------------------------- Example 3 ------------------------

Get-CsHealthMonitoringConfiguration -Filter *.litwareinc.com  | Remove-CsHealthMonitoringConfiguration 

The preceding command deletes all the health monitoring configuration settings that have been created for the domain litwareinc.com. To do this, Get-CsHealthMonitoringConfiguration is called along with the Filter parameter; the filter value "*.litwareinc.com" ensures that only those settings that have an Identity that ends with the string value ".litwareinc.com" will be returned. The filtered collection is then piped to Remove-CsHealthMonitoringConfiguration, which deletes each item in the collection.

-------------------------- Example 4 ------------------------

(Get-CsHealthMonitoringConfiguration | Where-Object {$_.FirstTestUserSipUri -eq "sip:kenmyer@litwareinc.com" -or $_.SecondTestUserSipUri -eq " sip:kenmyer@litwareinc.com"}) | Remove-CsHealthMonitoringConfiguration

The command shown in Example 4 deletes all the health monitoring configuration settings that include the user with the SIP address sip:kenmyer@litwareinc.com as one of the test users. To perform this task, the command starts off by calling Get-CsHealthMonitoringConfiguration without any parameters; this returns a collection of all the health monitoring configuration settings currently in use in the organization. This collection is then piped to the Where-Object cmdlet, which picks out only those settings where the FirstTestUserSipUri property is equal to "sip:kenmyer@litwareinc.com" or where the SecondTestUserSipUri property is equal to "sip:kenmyer@litwareinc.com". In turn, those settings are piped to, and removed by, Remove-CsHealthMonitoringConfiguration.

 
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