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Repeating Events

Updated: November 1, 2013

Applies To: System Center 2012 - Operations Manager, System Center 2012 R2 Operations Manager, System Center 2012 SP1 - Operations Manager

Repeated event detection in Operations Manager uses one or more occurrences of a particular event in a time window to indicate an error condition in a monitor. Repeated event logic is available for the following monitors:

  • Windows Events

  • Text Logs

  • WMI Events

This typically applies to conditions in an application where a single event on its own can be ignored, but multiple occurrences of that event in a particular time window indicate a potential error. There are different algorithms that can be used for this detection, depending on the logic that best identifies the specific application issue. The following are details of the different algorithms:

Trigger on Timer

Trigger on timer consolidation of events uses a specified time window and is not dependent on the number of events received. A single event can trigger an error in the health state as in simple detection. Unlike simple detection which sets the health state immediately upon detection of the specified event, however trigger on timer consolidation waits until a specified time window to set the health state of the monitor. The time window can be a rotating time duration of specified length or a specific window based on day of the week.

Trigger on timer consolidation is useful for errors that should only be detected in a certain time window. Used with a time window based on a specific time of day, this disables the monitor outside that time period. It can also have the effect of delaying the change of state for a particular time during which an event that indicates a healthy state could be received. In this case, the health state would never be changed.

Trigger on Count

Trigger on count consolidation of events lets a monitor require multiple occurrences of the same event in a specified time window before it changes the health state to an error. The time window can be rotating time duration of specified length or a specific window based on day of the week.

Trigger on count consolidation resembles trigger on timer consolidation except that multiple occurrences of the event are required instead of just one. When the time window is reached, the event count is returned to zero, and the specific number of events must detected before the time window expires again for the health state to be changed.

Trigger on Count, Sliding

Trigger on count, sliding consolidation of events is similar to trigger on count consolidation except that the time window is reset every time that the specified event is received. The time window only expires if the time is reached after the occurrence of the last event.

Trigger on count, sliding consolidation is useful for error conditions that are detected by a certain number of events in a particular length of time. By using trigger on count consolidation, some events could be received in one time window and then other events received in the next time window with the result that the health state is never changed. Using trigger on count, sliding consolidation, the time window depends on when the event occurs preventing this condition.

Repeated Events Example

To help with understanding the different algorithms used for repeated event detection, the following table shows the effect on health state for monitors based on the different kinds of consolidation. This is based on a repeated event monitor that uses the following details:

  • Consolidation interval: 2 minutes

  • Compare count: 3 (ignored by Trigger on Timer)

  • Health state on repeated event: Critical

  • Reset Logic: Event reset using Event 3

 

Time Event Trigger on Timer Trigger on Count Trigger on Count, Sliding

00:00:00

-

Healthy

Healthy

Healthy

00:01:00

Event 1

Healthy

Healthy

Healthy

00:02:00

-

Healthy

Healthy

Healthy

00:02:30

-

Healthy

Healthy

Healthy

00:03:00

-

Critical

Healthy

Healthy

00:03:30

Event 3

Healthy

Healthy

Healthy

00:04:00

Event 1

Healthy

Healthy

Healthy

00:04:30

-

Healthy

Healthy

Healthy

00:05:00

Event 1

Critical

Healthy

Healthy

00:05:30

-

Critical

Healthy

Healthy

00:06:00

-

Critical

Healthy

Healthy

06:30:00

Event 1

Critical

Healthy

Healthy

07:00:00

Event 1

Critical

Healthy

Critical

07:30:00

-

Critical

Healthy

Critical

00:08:00

Event 1

Critical

Healthy

Critical

00:08:30

-

Critical

Critical

Critical

00:09:00

Healthy

Critical

Healthy

Healthy

  • Using trigger on timer, a critical state is set at 00:03:00 event though the event is received at 00:01:00 because the time window starts when the monitor is loaded. The start is reset to healthy at 00:03:30, but the critical state is again triggered at 00:05:00 from the time window started at 00:03:00.

  • Using trigger on count, the event at 00:05:00 does not trigger a critical state because the time window started by the event at 00:01:00 would have expired at 00:03:00. This event is instead part of the time window started by the event at 00:04:00 which expires at 00:06:00. The monitor triggers a critical state at 00:08:30 because of the 3 events detected in the time window started with the event at 00:06:30.

  • Using trigger on count, sliding, each occurrence of Event 1 starts its own window. The critical state is triggered at 00:07:00 from the 3 events detected in the time window started with the event at 00:05:00.

Creating Repeated Event Monitors

The following procedure describes how to create a repeating event monitor with the following details:

  • Positioned under the Availability aggregate monitor.

  • Sets the monitor to a critical state when three events with source EventCreate and number 201 are detected in the Application event log within 10 minutes.

  • Resets after fifteen minutes of no event being received.

  • Creates an alert when the monitor enters a critical state.

noteNote
EventCreate is used as the event source so that the EventCreate utility can be used to create a test event. This utility is available on any Windows Computer and creates test events with a source of EventCreate. If you have another method of creating test events, then you can use a different source.

To create a repeating event monitor

  1. If you don’t have a management pack for the application that you are monitoring, create one using the process in Selecting a Management Pack File.

  2. Create a new target using the process in To create a Windows Service template. You can use any service installed on a test agent for this template.

  3. In the Operations console, select the Authoring workspace.

  4. Select Management Pack Objects.

  5. Right-click Monitors, select Create and Monitor, and then select Unit Monitor.

  6. On the Monitor Type page, do the following:

    1. In the Select the type of monitor to create box, expand Windows Events and then Repeated Event Detection.

    2. Select Timer Reset.

    3. In the Management Pack dropdown list, select the management pack for the application.

    4. Click Next.

  7. On the General page, do the following:

    1. In the Name box, type Repeated error event 201 or another name for the monitor. This is the text that will appear in the Health Explorer.

    2. Click Select.

    3. In the Select Items to Target dialog box, select the name that you used for the Windows Service template in step 2.

    4. The Parent monitor box should show Availability. You can select a different parent monitor.

    5. Ensure that Availability is selected for the Parent monitor.

    6. The Monitor is enabled box should be checked so that the monitor is enabled.

    7. Click Next.

  8. On the Event Log Name page, do the following:

    1. In the Log Name box, keep the default value of Application.

    2. Click Next

  9. On the Event Expression page, do the following:

    1. For the Event ID value, type 201

    2. For the Event Source value, type EventCreate

    3. Click Next.

  10. On the Repeated Settings page, do the following:

    1. For the Counting Mode, select Trigger on count, sliding.

    2. For the Compare Count, type 3.

    3. Select Based on items occurrence within a time interval.

    4. For the Interval, type 10 and select Minutes.

    5. Click Next.

  11. On the Auto Reset Timer page, do the following:

    1. For Specify wait time, select 15 minutes.

    2. Click Next

  12. On the Configure Health page, do the following:

    1. For Timer Event Raised, leave the Health State as Healthy.

    2. For Repeated Event Raised, set the Health State to Critical.

    3. Click Next.

  13. On the Configure Alerts page, do the following:

    1. Check Generate alerts for this monitor.

    2. For Generate an alert when: leave the default of The monitor is in a critical health state.

    3. Leave the box Automatically resolve the alert when the monitor returns to a health state checked.

    4. For the Alert name, leave the default which is the name of the monitor or replace it with different text. This will be the name of the alert that appears in the Operations console when the alert is created.

    5. Leave the default Priority of Medium.

    6. Leave the default Severity of Critical. Note that you can change the alert severity to Warning even though the monitor is set to Critical

    7. In the Alert description box, type Event 201 was detected $Data/Context/Count$ times between $Data/Context/TimeWindowStart$ and $Data/Context/TimeWindowEnd$. The first event was at $Data/Context/TimeWindowStart$. The last event was at $Data/Context/TimeWindowEnd$.. Rather than typing in each of the $Data variables, you can select them by clicking the ellipse button and then selecting Data and the property.

    8. Click Create.

See Also

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For additional resources, see Information and Support for System Center 2012.

Tip: Use this query to find online documentation in the TechNet Library for System Center 2012. For instructions and examples, see Search the System Center 2012 Documentation Library.
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