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Using MigrateDatasourceDataFromDPM

Updated: November 1, 2013

Applies To: System Center 2012 - Data Protection Manager, System Center 2012 R2 Data Protection Manager, System Center 2012 SP1 - Data Protection Manager

MigrateDatasourceDataFromDPM is a command-line script that lets you migrate System Center 2012 – Data Protection Manager (DPM) data for a data source – replica volumes and recovery point volumes – across disks. Such a migration might be necessary when your disk is full and cannot expand, your disk is due for replacement, or disk errors show up.

noteNote
MigrateDatasourceDataFromDPM is used to migrate DPM volumes whereas Migrate-Datasource is used to migrate protected computer volumes.

Depending on how you have configured your environment, this could mean one of more of the following scenarios for moving data source data:

  • DPM disk to DPM disk

  • Data source to DPM disk

  • Data source to custom volume

The MigrateDatasourceDataFromDPM script moves all data for a data source or disk to the new disk or volume. After migration is complete, the original disk from where the data was migrated is not chosen for hosting any new backups. You must retain your old disks until all recovery points on them expire. After the recovery points expire, DPM automatically unallocates the replicas and recovery point volumes on these disks.

Migrating does not move recovery point data on the replica, it simply makes new replica and recovery point volumes, then copies the replica data to the new replica. VSS shadow copies are volume specific and cannot be moved or copied. So while all new recovery points are made on the migrated disk, the old replicas and recovery points on the old volume are still required. However, if you want to remove the old disk sooner, then you can reduce the retention range and wait for the old recovery points to expire.

All backup schedules continue to apply and protection of the data source continues as before.

After migrating the replica of a data source that has secondary protection enabled, you must start the Modify Protection Group wizard on the secondary DPM server, select the same data source, and complete the wizard. This reconfigures secondary backups to run from the new replica volume on the primary DPM server.

Syntax

MigrateDatasourceDataFromDPM.ps1 [-DPMServerName] <string> [-Source] <disk[]> [-Destination] <disk[]>

MigrateDatasourceDataFromDPM.ps1 [-DPMServerName] <string> [-Source] <data source> [-Destination] <disk[]>

MigrateDatasourceDataFromDPM.ps1 [-DPMServerName] <string> [-Source] <data source> [-Destination] <DPM server volume[]>

 

Parameter Description

DPMServerName

Name of the DPM server for which you want to migrate data.

Source

The location from which the data must be moved. This can be either a DPM disk (use Get-DPMDisk to retrieve the disk) or a DPM data source (use Get-Datasource to retrieve the data source). The source can be a set of disks.

Destination

The location to which the data must be moved.
This can be either a DPM disk array (use Get-DPMDisk to retrieve the array of disks) or an array of two DPM volumes (use Get-DPMVolume to retrieve the list of DPM volumes on the server). The first element of the array is the destination replica volume and the second the recovery point volume.
The destination disks must be added to the DPM disk pool before migration.

noteNote
The numbering for the disk array starts with 0.

Examples

The following examples show how the script works.

Example 1: Disk D1 contains the replica and recovery points for the data source DS1.

 

Disk Replica Recovery Point

D1

R1

RP1

To do a disk to disk migration of the volumes on D1 to another disk D2, do the following:

$disk = Get-DPMDisk –DPMServerName DPMTestServer
./MigrateDatasourceDataFromDPM.ps1 –DPMServerName DPMTestServer –Source $disk[0] –Destination $disk[1]

This results in the following:

 

Disk Replica Recovery Point

D1

R1

RP1

D2

R1’

RP1’

You need to retain D1 for the retention range of the latest recovery point on it, usually one month. After the latest recovery point expires, DPM will deallocate the replicas and recovery points on disk D1 automatically.

Example 2: Disk D1 contains the replica of the data source DS1 and the recovery point for data source DS2. Disk 2 contains the replica of DS2 and the recovery point for DS1.

 

Disk Replica Recovery Point

D1

R1

RP2

D2

R2

RP1

If you do a DPM disk to DPM disk migration to a third disk (Disk 3), this disk will have four volumes, replicas and recovery points for DS1 and DS2.

$disk = Get-DPMDisk –DPMServerName DPMTestServer
./MigrateDatasourceDataFromDPM.ps1 –DPMServerName DPMTestServer –Source $disk[0] –Destination $disk[2]

This results in the following:

 

Disk Replica Recovery Point

D1

R1

RP2

D2

R2

RP1

D3

R1’ and R2’

RP1’ and RP2’

This happens because DPM cannot move just a replica or a recovery point, it will always move them in pairs, hence even though the command only moves the volumes from D1, DPM will move also the related replica and recovery point.

Example 3: Disk D1 contains the replica of the data source DS1 and the recovery point for data source DS2. Disk D2 contains the replica of DS2 and the recovery point for DS1.

 

Disk Replica Recovery Point

D1

R1

RP2

D2

R2

RP1

If you choose to migrate only the data for DS1 to a third disk (Disk 3), this disk will have two volumes, the replica and recovery point for DS1.

$pg = Get-ProtectionGroup DPMTestServer
$ds = Get-Datasource $pg[0]
$disk = Get-DPMDisk –DPMServerName DPMTestServer
./MigrateDatasourceDataFromDPM.ps1 –DPMServerName DPMTestServer –Source $ds[0] –Destination $disk[2]

 

Disk Replica Recovery Point

D1

R1

RP2

D2

R2

RP1

D3

R1’

RP1’

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For additional resources, see Information and Support for System Center 2012.

Tip: Use this query to find online documentation in the TechNet Library for System Center 2012. For instructions and examples, see Search the System Center 2012 Documentation Library.
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