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Deploy Access-Denied Assistance (Demonstration Steps)

Published: February 29, 2012

Updated: August 20, 2012

Applies To: Windows Server 2012



This topic explains how to configure access-denied assistance, and verify that it is working properly.

In this document

noteNote
This topic includes sample Windows PowerShell cmdlets that you can use to automate some of the procedures described. For more information, see Using Cmdlets.

You can configure access-denied assistance within a domain by using Group Policy, or you can configure the assistance individually on each file server by using the File Server Resource Manager console. You can also change the access-denied message for a specific shared folder on a file server.

You can configure access-denied assistance for the domain by using Group Policy as follows:

Do this step using Windows PowerShell

  1. Open Group Policy Management. In Server Manager, click Tools, and then click Group Policy Management.

  2. Right-click the appropriate Group Policy, and then click Edit.

  3. Click Computer Configuration, click Policies, click Administrative Templates, click System, and then click Access-Denied Assistance.

  4. Right-click Customize message for Access Denied errors, and then click Edit.

  5. Select the Enabled option.

  6. Configure the following options:

    1. In the Display the following message to users who are denied access box, type a message that users will see when they are denied access to a file or folder.

      You can add macros to the message that will insert customized text. The macros include:

      • [Original File Path] The original file path that was accessed by the user.

      • [Original File Path Folder] The parent folder of the original file path that was accessed by the user.

      • [Admin Email] The administrator email recipient list.

      • [Data Owner Email] The data owner email recipient list.

    2. Select the Enable users to request assistance check box.

    3. Leave the remaining default settings.

PowerShell Logo Windows PowerShell equivalent commands

The following Windows PowerShell cmdlet or cmdlets perform the same function as the preceding procedure. Enter each cmdlet on a single line, even though they may appear word-wrapped across several lines here because of formatting constraints.

Set-GPRegistryValue –Name “Name of GPO” –key “HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\ADR\AccessDenied” –ValueName AllowEmailRequests –Type DWORD –value 1
Set-GPRegistryValue –Name “Name of GPO” –key “HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\ADR\AccessDenied” –ValueName GenerateLog –Type DWORD –value 1
Set-GPRegistryValue –Name “Name of GPO” –key “HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\ADR\AccessDenied” –ValueName IncludeDeviceClaims –Type DWORD –value 1
Set-GPRegistryValue –Name “Name of GPO” –key “HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\ADR\AccessDenied” –ValueName IncludeUserClaims –Type DWORD –value 1
Set-GPRegistryValue –Name “Name of GPO” –key “HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\ADR\AccessDenied” –ValueName PutAdminOnTo –Type DWORD –value 1
Set-GPRegistryValue –Name “Name of GPO” –key “HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\ADR\AccessDenied” –ValueName PutDataOwnerOnTo –Type DWORD –value 1
Set-GPRegistryValue –Name “Name of GPO” –key “HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\ADR\AccessDenied” –ValueName ErrorMessage –Type MultiString –value “Type the text that the user will see in the error message dialog box.”
Set-GPRegistryValue –Name “Name of GPO” –key “HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\ADR\AccessDenied” –ValueName Enabled –Type DWORD –value 1

Alternatively, you can configure access-denied assistance individually on each file server by using the File Server Resource Manager console.

Do this step using Windows PowerShell

  1. Open File Server Resource Manager. In Server Manager, click Tools, and then click File Server Resource Manager.

  2. Right-click File Server Resource Manager (Local), and then click Configure Options.

  3. Click the Access-Denied Assistance tab.

  4. Select the Enable access-denied assistance check box.

  5. In the Display the following message to users who are denied access to a folder or file box, type a message that users will see when they are denied access to a file or folder.

    You can add macros to the message that will insert customized text. The macros include:

    • [Original File Path] The original file path that was accessed by the user.

    • [Original File Path Folder] The parent folder of the original file path that was accessed by the user.

    • [Admin Email] The administrator email recipient list.

    • [Data Owner Email] The data owner email recipient list.

  6. Click Configure email requests, select the Enable users to request assistance check box, and then click OK.

  7. Click Preview if you want to see how the error message will look to the user.

  8. Click OK.

PowerShell Logo Windows PowerShell equivalent commands

The following Windows PowerShell cmdlet or cmdlets perform the same function as the preceding procedure. Enter each cmdlet on a single line, even though they may appear word-wrapped across several lines here because of formatting constraints.

Set-FSRMAdrSetting -Event "AccessDenied" –DisplayMessage “Type the text that the user will see in the error message dialog box.” -Enabled:$true -AllowRequests:$true

After you configure the access-denied assistance, you must enable it for all file types by using Group Policy.

Do this step using Windows PowerShell

  1. Open Group Policy Management. In Server Manager, click Tools, and then click Group Policy Management.

  2. Right-click the appropriate Group Policy, and then click Edit.

  3. Click Computer Configuration, click Policies, click Administrative Templates, click System, and then click Access-Denied Assistance.

  4. Right-click Enable access-denied assistance on client for all file types, and then click Edit.

  5. Click Enabled, and then click OK.

PowerShell Logo Windows PowerShell equivalent commands

The following Windows PowerShell cmdlet or cmdlets perform the same function as the preceding procedure. Enter each cmdlet on a single line, even though they may appear word-wrapped across several lines here because of formatting constraints.

Set-GPRegistryValue –Name “Name of GPO” –key “HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\Explorer” –ValueName EnableShellExecuteFileStreamCheck –Type DWORD –value 1

You can also specify a separate access-denied message for each shared folder on a file server by using the File Server Resource Manager console.

Do this step using Windows PowerShell

  1. Open File Server Resource Manager. In Server Manager, click Tools, and then click File Server Resource Manager.

  2. Expand File Server Resource Manager (Local), and then click Classification Management.

  3. Right-click Classification Properties, and then click Set Folder Management Properties.

  4. In the Property box, click Access-Denied Assistance Message, and then click Add.

  5. Click Browse, and then choose the folder that should have the custom access-denied message.

  6. In the Value box, type the message that should be presented to the users when they cannot access a resource within that folder.

    You can add macros to the message that will insert customized text. The macros include:

    • [Original File Path] The original file path that was accessed by the user.

    • [Original File Path Folder] The parent folder of the original file path that was accessed by the user.

    • [Admin Email] The administrator email recipient list.

    • [Data Owner Email] The data owner email recipient list.

  7. Click OK, and then click Close.

PowerShell Logo Windows PowerShell equivalent commands

The following Windows PowerShell cmdlet or cmdlets perform the same function as the preceding procedure. Enter each cmdlet on a single line, even though they may appear word-wrapped across several lines here because of formatting constraints.

Set-FSRMMgmtProperty -Namespace "folder path” -Name "AccessDeniedMessage_MS" -Value “Type the text that the user will see in the error message dialog box.”

You must configure the email notification settings on each file server that will send the access-denied assistance messages.

Do this step using Windows PowerShell

  1. Open File Server Resource Manager. In Server Manager, click Tools, and then click File Server Resource Manager.

  2. Right-click File Server Resource Manager (Local), and then click Configure Options.

  3. Click the Email Notifications tab.

  4. Configure the following settings:

    • In the SMTP server name or IP address box, type the name of IP address of the SMTP server in your organization.

    • In the Default administrator recipients and Default “From” e-mail address boxes, type the email address of the file server administrator.

  5. Click Send Test E-mail to ensure that the email notifications are configured correctly.

  6. Click OK.

PowerShell Logo Windows PowerShell equivalent commands

The following Windows PowerShell cmdlet or cmdlets perform the same function as the preceding procedure. Enter each cmdlet on a single line, even though they may appear word-wrapped across several lines here because of formatting constraints.

set-FSRMSetting -SMTPServer “server1” -AdminEmailAddress “fileadmin@contoso.com” -FromEmailAddress “fileadmin@contoso.com”

You can verify that the access-denied assistance is configured correctly by having a user who is running Windows 8 try to access a share or a file in that share that they do not have access to. When the access-denied message appears, the user should see a Request Assistance button. After clicking the Request Assistance button, the user can specify a reason for access and then send an email to the folder owner or file server administrator. The folder owner or file server administrator can verify for you that the email arrived and contains the appropriate details.

ImportantImportant
If you want to verify access-denied assistance by having a user who is running Windows Server 2012, you must install the Desktop Experience before connecting to the file share.

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