TechNet Magazine > Home > Issues > 2008 > November >  Letters: Readers Speak Out
Letters Readers Speak Out



Processor Cores
I Just read the October 2008 article "Manage Your Virtual Environments with VMM 2008" (see technet.microsoft.com/magazine/cc836456). Is Virtual Machine Manager (VMM) required for managing Hyper-V? Is it possible to manage Hyper-V hosts without VMM and, if so, does that mean I won't get all the features of Hyper-V? Do I need to buy VMM to get all its features?
—Barry C.
VMM 2008 is not required to manage Hyper-V. You can manage all of your Hyper-V hosts using the Hyper-V Manager Microsoft Management Console (MMC) that comes with Hyper-V hosts (and is a download available for systems running Windows Vista). Hyper-V Manager can enable all functions of Hyper-V. VMM is a separate add-on that brings centralized, multiserver management along with additional features such as P2V, V2V, Templates, and integration with Operations Manager.
—Edwin Yuen, Technical Product Manager, Windows Enterprise Management, Division for System Center VMM

Microsoft Assessment and Planning Toolkit
After reading about the Microsoft Assessment and Planning (MAP) Toolkit in the October issue ("Essential Tools for Planning Your Virtual Infrastructure" at technet.microsoft.com/magazine/cc895647), I'm wondering if there are security issues I should know about?
—Louise E.
The MAP Toolkit is designed to operate securely to collect system resources and other hardware and device information about each desktop and server remotely without the use of any software agents on the individual machines. In addition, all passwords are encrypted and never persisted. All communications are encrypted and the tool supports both domain and local credentials.
—Jay Sauls, Senior Program Manager, Microsoft Solution Accelerators
—Baldwin Ng, Senior Product Manager, Microsoft Solution Accelerators Core Engineering Team

Firewalls
I just read your article "Essential Tools for Planning Your Virtual Infrastructure." With regard to firewall configuration, what do I have to know in order to use the MAP Toolkit?
—Richard K.
This tool will only work if Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) traffic is allowed from the MAP computer to the inventoried machines. Many host- and software-based firewall products will block DCOM traffic across the network adapters on the computer. To enable remote WMI access, you need to make sure that the TCP/UDP ports are opened up on the computer running the software firewall. You will need to ensure the following configuration is implemented prior to running the tool:
  • Enable Remote Administration exception: The "Remote Administration exception" needs to be enabled for computers when the Windows Firewall is enabled. This exception opens TCP port 135. If you have another host firewall installed then you will need to allow network traffic through this port. You should delete this exception after the MAP operation is completed.
  • Enable File and Printer Sharing exception: The "File and Printer Sharing" exception must be enabled for computers when the Windows Firewall is enabled. This exception opens TCP ports 139 and 445, and UDP ports 137 and 138. If you have another host firewall installed then you will need to allow network traffic through these ports. You should delete this exception after the MAP operation is completed.

—Jay Sauls and Baldwin Ng

MAP vs. VMM
How is the MAP Toolkit different from System Center VMM?
—Michael A.
The MAP Toolkit is designed to help you assess and plan for desktop, server, and virtualization projects during your planning phase. MAP is an agentless tool that does not require any preexisting management infrastructure, making it a great zero-footprint discovery tool to assist with migration scenarios. Specifically, MAP offers virtualization assessments to help you determine which physical servers are more suitable for virtualization, prior to deployment. Once migration and deployment occur, you will want to take advantage of System Center Virtual Machine Manager to manage your virtual workloads.
—Jay Sauls and Baldwin Ng

Got something to say? E-mail us at tnmag@microsoft.com, or visit our blog forum at blogs.technet.com/tnmag.

Page view tracker