Exportar (0) Imprimir
Expandir todo
Expandir Minimizar

Overview of Exchange 2000 Server and Exchange Server 2003 Special Mailboxes

 

Última modificación del tema: 2006-01-12

by Evan Dodds

This article covers several special mailboxes that are created by default on servers running Microsoft® Exchange Server 2003 and Exchange 2000 Server. This article also covers some of the frequently asked questions (FAQ) about the mailboxes and their usage.

In the SystemMailbox{guid} mailbox, you find the following structure.

Captura de pantalla de la estructura de SystemMailbox

Under Top of Information Store, you find the following.

Captura de pantalla de la parte superior de la jerarquía de Almacén de información

The schema-root hierarchy of folders provides the structure for defining the schema, which is principally stored in the exchangeV1 folder. The StoreEvents hierarchy holds any EXOLEDB (store) event sinks attached to this mailbox store. MAPI public folder stores also have approximately this same set of folders, one schema-root per hierarchy, and a StoreEvents folder for each public folder store. This may explain many of those extraneous folders that you have seen in the NON_IPM_SUBTREE.

Consider the following frequently asked questions:

  • Where can SystemMailbox{guid} be found?
    There are two parts to each SystemMailbox, the mailbox itself and an associated directory object. The mailbox object is located in its respective mailbox store. The directory object is located in the Microsoft Exchange System Objects (MESO) folder of the Active Directory® directory service, along with all the other public folder and system directory objects. You may need to enable the Advanced view in Active Directory Users and Computers to see this folder at the root of the domain naming context.
  • What is the GUID?
    The GUID in the SystemMailbox{guid} format is the objectGUID of the mailbox store with which this SystemMailbox object is associated. This can be useful to know if you have several different SystemMailbox{guid} directory objects in the MESO container, and you want to know which one relates to a particular message database (MDB) store.
  • When does it get created?
    Whenever you mount a mailbox store, one of the checks it runs is whether a SystemMailbox{guid} object is in place. If it cannot find one, it looks in the directory for the SystemMailbox{guid} directory object within the MESO container, and then creates the SystemMailbox{guid} mailbox object within the mailbox store.
  • Can the SystemMailbox{guid} be moved, and how do you re-create it?
    There should not be any need to move the SystemMailbox{guid}. Remember, each MDB has its own GUID associated with a particular instance of SystemMailbox{guid}.
    Similar to the previous question, if the directory object is missing, the mailbox object will not be created. In that case, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 316622, "Event sinks do not function correctly if the SystemMailbox{GUID} mailbox is absent from a mailbox store in Exchange Server 2003 or in Exchange 2000 Server," which will walk you through re-creating this directory object.
  • What happens if you do not have a proper SystemMailbox{guid}?
    If you do not have a fully functioning SystemMailbox{guid} in place, there is a chance that EXOLEDB event sinks will not function.
  • How can you log on to the SystemMailbox mailbox?
    For this procedure, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 253784, "XADM: How to Log On to the System Mailbox on Exchange 2000 Server."
  • Should you log on to the SystemMailbox mailbox?
    Do not log on to the SystemMailbox mailbox unless Microsoft Product Support Services directs you to do so.
  • Assuming your SystemMailbox shows that it has several hundred items comprising 361 kilobytes (KB) of data, should you reclaim this hard disk space?
    This is the size of the SystemMailbox with the schema definitions in it. This is expected and should not be altered.
  • Should you delete the SystemMailbox mailbox? Do you have to delete it before you can uninstall the Exchange server?
    You should not delete the SystemMailbox mailbox. When trying to remove the mailbox store or uninstall the server, if you get the following error, this is not due to the SystemMailbox mailbox:
    One or more users currently use this mailbox store. These users must be moved to a different mailbox store or be mail disabled before deleting this store. ID no: c1034a7f Exchange System Manager
    For more information about how to determine which mailbox is causing this behavior, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 279202, "You receive a "c1034a7f" error message when you delete a mailbox store."

Each server running Exchange Server 2003 or Exchange 2000 Server should have only one System Attendant mailbox. If the server has a mailbox that is misspelled, such as System Attendent mailbox, someone has probably added this.

The System Attendant mailbox has a folder within it called SpecialPrivateFolderForFreeBusyStorage. This folder is used when Collaboration Data Objects (CDO) or Microsoft Outlook® Web Access sends free/busy information to the store through the MSExchangeFBPublish process.

The System Attendant mailbox is also required to be available during mailbox moves. For example, if you have the mailbox store containing the System Attendant mailbox dismounted during a mailbox move, the move will fail, and you will find events 9175, 9167, and 1008 in your application event log. For more information, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 264413, "Error Connecting to Destination Server During Move Mailbox."

The System Attendant mailbox is also used to send and receive the messages used by the legacy link monitoring service.

Consider the following frequently asked questions:

  • Where can the System Attendant mailbox be found?
    There are two parts in the complete System Attendant mailbox: a directory object and a mailbox object. The directory object is the actual System Attendant object in the configuration container. The following is a typical location:
    CN=Microsoft System Attendant,CN=<servername>,CN=Servers,CN=<sitename>,CN=Administrative Groups,CN=<orgname>,CN=Microsoft Exchange,CN=Services,CN=Configuration,CN=<domain>
    This directory object hosts all of the directory attributes associated with the system attendant. There is also a mailbox object, stored in the first mailbox store created on a server running Exchange Server 2003 or Exchange 2000 Server. This is generally the Mailbox (servername) store.
  • When does the System Attendant mailbox get created? Can it be moved or re-created?
    The System Attendant mailbox is created when the system attendant is created on a server. It is associated with the first mailbox store created on a server.
    If an attempt is made to delete the mailbox store containing the System Attendant mailbox, the following warning will appear:
    Deleting this mailbox store may result in the loss of system messages used by Exchange, such as Free/Busy or Key Management Security. If you choose to continue, you need to restart the system attendant service after the store is deleted.
    If the store is then deleted, the System Attendant mailbox will be moved automatically into another mailbox store on the server, that is, the HomeMDB value on the directory object will be updated. The system attendant service must be restarted to reconfigure MSExchangeFBPublish to use the new mailbox location, and the mailbox object may not reappear under the Mailboxes node of Exchange System Manager until it is used in the future.
    If there is a System Attendant directory object but no mailbox object, the mailbox store object will be re-created automatically in the mailbox store referenced by the HomeMDB attribute as soon as it is needed. Note that one cause of this is using a blank store for troubleshooting.
  • What happens if you do not have a proper System Attendant mailbox?
    If there is no System Attendant mailbox available on a server, and in a mounted and functional mailbox store, anything that requires it will fail. You will see Event 9175 logged in the Application log, indicating a failure to log on to this mailbox by the system. You will see Outlook Web Access generated free/busy information not getting updated. You will see mailbox moves fail. It is an important mailbox to have configured properly and available.
  • Should you delete the System Attendant mailbox? Do you have to delete it before you can uninstall the server running Exchange Server?
    You should not delete the System Attendant mailbox. If you get the following error when trying to remove the mailbox store or uninstall the server, this is not due to the System Attendant mailbox:
    One or more users currently use this mailbox store. These users must be moved to a different mailbox store or be mail disabled before deleting this store. ID no: c1034a7f Exchange System Manager
    For more information about how to determine which mailbox is causing this behavior, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 279202, "You receive a "c1034a7f" error message when you delete a mailbox store."

The SMTP (servername-{guid}) mailbox is used by the mail transport of Exchange Server 2003 or Exchange 2000 Server as a temporary holding place for various messages as they pass through the system.

Inside the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) mailbox, you can find the following folder structure.

Captura de pantalla de la jerarquía MBX de SMTP

The folders MTS-IN and MTS-OUT are documented in the Exchange Server 2003 Software Development Kit (SDK) Message Transfer documentation. They are used by EDK connectors to facilitate the transfer of messages between the message transfer agent (MTA) and the store. They are also used for X400 connectors, site connectors, and fax connectors.

Consider TempTable folders. When a message is processed by Exchange transport, the message remains in one place while passing through the various phases and memory-based queues. If the message originates from SMTP from another server running Exchange Server 2003 or Exchange 2000 Server or the Internet, as the message comes in, it is written through the NTFS store driver to the mailroot or queue folder while going through categorization and advanced queuing. If the message originates from anywhere else, including MAPI client, Outlook Web Access, or the MTA, the message remains in the store during the same process, in the SMTP mailbox accessible to transport through the Exchange Server store driver using Installable File System (IFS). No matter where the physical message resides during transport processing, the queue viewer in Exchange System Manager will show messages from both places.

Consider the following frequently asked questions:

  • Where can SMTP (servername-{guid}) mailbox be found?
    An SMTP mailbox will be created on each mailbox store. It is stamped with the server name and the mailbox store GUID, so you should be able to identify it. There is a mailbox object within the mailbox store, and a corresponding SMTP mailbox directory object in Active Directory. The directory objects are found under the following container:
    CN=Connections,CN=<orgname>,CN=Microsoft Exchange,CN=Services,CN=Configuration,CN=<domain>
  • When does the SMTP (servername-{guid}) mailbox get created?
    The SMTP mailbox is created in a mailbox store when the store is first created and mounted.
  • Should you delete the SMTP (servername-{guid}) mailbox? Do you have to delete it before you can uninstall the server running Exchange Server?
    You should not delete the SMTP (servername-{guid}) mailbox. When trying to remove the mailbox store or uninstall the server, if you are getting the error, this is not due to the SMTP mailbox:
    One or more users currently use this mailbox store. These users must be moved to a different mailbox store or be mail disabled before deleting this store. ID no: c1034a7f Exchange System Manager
    For more information about how to determine which mailbox is causing this behavior, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 279202, "You receive a "c1034a7f" error message when you delete a mailbox store."
  • Can the SMTP (servername-{guid}) mailbox be moved? How do you re-create it?
    You should not move the SMTP mailbox, because it is closely associated with the server name and GUID of a particular mailbox store.
    If the SMTP mailbox is deleted from a mailbox store, but the directory object remains, you can re-create it by dismounting and remounting the mailbox store. If the directory object is in place and is valid, the store will automatically re-create the SMTP mailbox object within the mailbox store. If it is not re-created, for additional options, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 828938, "Messages remain in the local delivery queue because of a disconnected SMTP mailbox."
    If the SMTP mailbox directory object does not exist, the SMTP mailbox object in the mailbox store will become disconnected and will not be functional. You will see events 1022, 326, and 1194 logged in the Application log. Generally, if this happens, mail will remain in the outbox. You will need to re-create the SMTP mailbox following the steps in Microsoft Knowledge Base article 828938. Alternately, you can create a new mailbox store, and move users from the store without an SMTP mailbox to the newly created mailbox store.
  • How can you log on to the SMTP mailbox?
    You should only log on to the SMTP mailbox when advised by Microsoft Product Support Services. There is a tool called Profinst that will create a MAPI profile to the SMTP mailbox. Note that there are several versions of this tool, and if you run the wrong version, for example, running the version associated with Exchange Server version 5.5 against a server running Exchange Server 2003 or Exchange 2000 Server, it can cause problems. For Exchange Server 2003 or Exchange 2000 Server, you want the version dated August 21, 2001, or later. The tool size should be approximately 28 kilobytes (KB) and can be found at the following Microsoft resources:
  • What happens if you do not have a proper SMTP mailbox?
    If your SMTP mailbox is not functional, mail will not be able to pass through local delivery into the store or exit the store outbound for SMTP or EDK connectors. This will manifest as mail queuing up inbound to the store and as mail remaining in the outbox within Outlook. Note that this is not the only issue that can cause mail to queue or to remain in the outbox. Particularly if the mail eventually is processed, it is likely not the problem, but it is definitely something to check if mail flow stops.

 
¿Te ha resultado útil?
(Caracteres restantes: 1500)
Gracias por sus comentarios
Mostrar:
© 2014 Microsoft