Export (0) Print
Expand All
65 out of 89 rated this helpful - Rate this topic

Migrating Windows Small Business Server 2003 to New Hardware

Updated: May 27, 2009

Applies To: Windows SBS 2003

If you decide that your server running the Windows® Small Business Server 2003 (Windows SBS) server software is no longer able to keep up with the demands of your organization, and expansion is not a viable option, you can use this guide to help you migrate the Windows SBS 2003 settings and data to new hardware.

By using the guide, you will learn how to install Windows SBS 2003 on a new computer, join the new computer to the existing Microsoft® Active Directory® directory services domain, and then migrate the Windows SBS 2003 settings and data from the old computer to the new computer. If you are migrating to a computer that has Windows SBS 2003 preinstalled by an original equipment manufacturer (OEM), you will be directed to reinstall Windows SBS 2003. You must have the Windows SBS 2003 discs to complete the migration process.

noteNote
If you are upgrading from Microsoft Small Business Server 2000 or Microsoft Windows 2000 Server to Windows SBS 2003, see the paper describing this process at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20143).

Before you begin

To prepare to migrate your existing server to new hardware, familiarize yourself with the following new terms and definitions and the process for completing a migration.

Terms and definitions

These key terms are associated with migrating Windows SBS 2003 to new hardware:

  • Active Directory Installation Wizard (Dcpromo.exe)   Installs, configures, or removes domain controllers. A domain controller provides network users and computers with access to Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS).

  • Client access license (CAL) for Windows Server 2003   Required to access or to use the Windows Server® 2003 operating system. You can purchase a Windows Per Device CAL for every device accessing your servers, or you can purchase a Windows Per User CAL for every named user accessing your servers.

  • Destination server   The server to which you are migrating. References to the destination server in this document refer to the server onto which you will install Windows SBS 2003 and to which you will transfer data and settings.

  • Global catalog server   The domain controller that manages a distributed data repository, which contains a searchable, partial representation of every object in every domain in an Active Directory forest.

  • Internet Information Services (IIS) 6.0 Migration Tool   Transfers configuration data, Web site content, and application settings to a new server that is running IIS 6.0.

  • Line-of-business (LOB) application   Included in the set of critical computer applications that are vital to running an enterprise, such as accounting, supply-chain management, and resource-planning applications.

  • Migration   The process of installing Windows SBS 2003 on a new computer, joining the new computer to an Active Directory domain, and then transferring Windows SBS 2003 data and settings from an old computer to a new computer.

  • Operations master   Specialized domain-controller tasks in AD DS (also known as flexible single master operations or FSMO), which are used where standard data transfer and update methods are inadequate.

  • Site licensing server   The service that manages licenses, which enable access to AD DS.

  • Source server   The server from which you are migrating. References to the source server in this document refer to your existing server that is running Windows SBS 2003.

Process for completing a migration

Migrating from an existing computer running Windows SBS 2003 to new hardware includes the following steps:

  1. Evaluate the current status of the source server.

  2. Install Windows SBS 2003 and join the domain.

  3. Transfer Exchange Server 2003 settings and folders.

  4. Migrate shared folders and data folders.

  5. Install and configure the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP).

  6. Configure Windows SBS 2003 settings.

  7. Migrate Internet Information Services (IIS) Web sites.

  8. Install and migrate Windows Server Update Services (WSUS).

  9. Migrate Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server settings.

  10. Migrate Microsoft SQL Server™ databases.

  11. Remove the source server from the network.

Sample timeline

You can use the following sample timeline as a guide for estimating the time it will take to complete the migration and to learn about dependencies in the migration process. For more information about the steps in the timeline, see the instructions for that step later in this document.

 

Day Tasks Important Information

Before Day 1

  • Step 1. Evaluate the current status of the source server

  • You should complete all of the worksheets found at the end of this document before you start the migration process.

Day 1

  • Step 2. Install Windows SBS 2003 and join the domain

  • Step 3. Transfer Exchange Server 2003 settings and folders

  • You must cancel the setup process when the Continuing Microsoft Small Business Server Setup dialog box appears.

  • When you complete the task that promotes the destination server to a global catalog server, wait for event 1119 or 1869 to appear in the Event Viewer before continuing with the next task.

Day 2

  • Step 4. Migrate shared folders and data folders

  • You can use a tool like Xcopy or RoboCopy to copy files and folders to the destination server.

Day 3

  • Step 5. Install and Configure DHCP

  • Step 6. Configure Windows SBS 2003 settings

  • Step 7. Migrate Internet Information Services (IIS) Web sites

  • Step 8. Install and migrate Windows Server Update Services (WSUS)

  • When you migrate WSUS, ensure that you are migrating to the correct version. The procedures in this document are used to migrate from WSUS 2.0 to WSUS 2.0.

  • CALs should not be transferred until you ensure that the setup process will complete successfully.

Day 4

  • Step 9. Migrate Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server settings

  • Step 10. Migrate SQL Server databases

  • You do not need to move SQL Server databases unless you have separate databases that support LOB applications.

Day 5

  • Step 11. Remove the source server from the network

  • You have seven days from when you join the destination server to the domain before the source server must be demoted.

noteNote
It is highly recommended that you be onsite the first day after a migration to assist users with questions.

Step 1. Evaluate the current status of the source server

In this step, you can ensure a successful migration by completing the following tasks:

  • Collect information about the source server.

  • Verify that the hardware and software are compatible.

  • Install the most recent service packs.

  • Verify the health of the source server.

  • Plan for migrating line-of-business (LOB) applications.

  • Stop folder redirection on the source server.

  • Prepare ISA Server 2004 for migration.

  • Back up the source server.

Collect information about the source server

Migrating Windows SBS 2003 to new hardware requires that you collect information about the source server and make decisions about information needed for the destination server.

Complete the Migration Worksheets at the end of this document. The worksheets request the following information:

  • Worksheet 1: Source and Destination Computer Information. Record information about the source server and destination server. You can use the information when you install Windows SBS 2003 on the destination server.

  • Worksheet 2: SMTP Connector Settings. The settings for Exchange connectors are not replicated to the destination server when the server is joined to the domain. You must record the information for the SMTP connector on the source server and then use the information that you recorded to configure the SMTP connector on the destination server.

  • Worksheet 3: Exchange Server 2003 Global Settings. If you have modified the Global Settings, such as Internet Message Format properties, Message Delivery properties, or Mobile Services properties, record the property changes. Later in the migration, you will change the properties on the destination server.

  • Worksheet 4: Location of Data for LOB Applications and Location of General User Data. Record the location of data for LOB applications and general user data that is not located in a shared folder and that needs to be migrated from the source server to the destination server.

  • Worksheet 5: Windows SBS 2003 Settings. If you have configured Remote Access, printers, or backup, use this worksheet to record the settings. You will use the To Do List and this worksheet to configure the settings for these Windows SBS 2003 components.

  • Worksheet 6: Shared Folder Information. Record the folders that are shared and the permissions of the shared folders that must be migrated from the source server to the destination server.

Verify that hardware and software are compatible

If you plan to move hardware or to install existing software from your source server to the destination server, you must ensure that the hardware and existing applications are compatible. To do so, check the hardware and software compatibility information in the Windows Server Catalog at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20157).

Install the most recent service packs

It is highly recommended that the source server and the destination server run the latest service packs. The service packs listed in this section were used for the baseline testing of this document. Before installing a service pack, back up your server.

ImportantImportant
You must install Service Pack 1 (SP1) for Windows SBS before you install Service Pack 2 (SP2) for Windows Server 2003 to ensure that the correct version of the .NET Framework is installed.

Ensure that the most recent service pack for Windows SBS 2003 is installed on your server.

To verify that your server is running Service Pack 1 for Windows Small Business Server 2003

  1. Start the Registry Editor, and then locate the following registry entry:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\SmallBusinesServer\ServicePackNumber

    The Data value should be 0x00000001.

  2. Install SP1 for Windows SBS 2003 if it is not installed. You can download SP1 for Windows SBS 2003 from the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=46690).

Ensure that the most recent service pack for Windows Server 2003 is installed on your server.

To verify that your server is running Service Pack 2 for Windows Server 2003

  1. Click Start, and then click Server Management.

  2. In the console pane, click Server Computers.

  3. In the details pane, right-click the server, click Properties, and then click the Operating System tab. Service Pack 2 should appear in the Service pack column.

  4. Install SP2 for Windows Server 2003 if it is not installed. You can download SP2 for Windows Server 2003 from the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=98932).

noteNote
If you experience network-related problems after installing this service pack, search for article 936594, “You may experience network-related problems after you install Windows Server 2003 SP2 or the Scalable Networking Pack” at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20167).

To learn more about the best practices and known issues related to SP2 for Windows Server 2003, search for article 939421, “Best practices and known issues when you install Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 2 on a Windows Small Business Server 2003-based computer” at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20167).

Ensure that the most recent service pack for Exchange Server 2003 is installed on your server.

To verify that your server is running Service Pack 2 for Exchange Server 2003

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

  2. Expand Administrative Groups, and then expand First administrative group.

    noteNote
    If Administrative Groups does not appear in the console pane, right-click YourExchangeOrganization, click Properties, select the Display administrative groups check box, and then click OK twice.

  3. Expand Servers, right-click the server, and then click Properties.

  4. Install SP2 for Exchange Server 2003 if it is not installed. You can download SP2 for Exchange Server 2003 from the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=98933).

Ensure that the most recent service pack for Windows SharePoint® Services 2.0 is installed on your server.

To verify that your server is running Service Pack 2 for Windows SharePoint Services 2.0

  1. Click Start, point to Control Panel, and then click Add or Remove Programs.

  2. Click Microsoft Windows SharePoint Services 2.0, and then click Click here for support information.

    The version number for SP2 for Windows SharePoint Services 2.0 is 11.0.7969.0.

  3. Install SP2 for Windows SharePoint Services 2.0 if it is not installed. You can download SP2 for Windows SharePoint Services 2.0 from the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=100179).

Verify the health of the source server

You can use tools in the Windows Support Tools to verify that there are no issues with your network or domain before you start the migration process. From Windows SBS 2003 Disc 2, run suptools.msi to install the tools. The following table lists the tools that you can use to diagnose issues.

 

Tool Description

Netdiag.exe

Helps to isolate networking and connectivity issues by performing a series of tests to determine the state of your network client computer.

Dcdiag.exe

Analyzes the state of domain controllers in a forest or enterprise, and reports any issues to assist in troubleshooting.

Repadmin.exe

Assists you in diagnosing replication issues between domain controllers.

You can also use the Windows SBS 2003 Best Practices Analyzer (BPA) to examine a server that is running Windows SBS 2003. For more information about the BPA, search for article 940439, “Description of the Windows Small Business Server 2003 Best Practices Analyzer tool” at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20167).

You should correct all issues that are reported by the diagnostic tools before you proceed with the migration process.

Plan for migrating line-of-business applications

When you plan to migrate your LOB applications, it is important that you consult with the LOB application provider to determine the appropriate method for migrating the application. You must locate the media that is used to reinstall the LOB applications on the destination server. When you migrate LOB applications, refer to the information that you collected in “Worksheet 4: Location of Data for LOB Applications and of General User Data.”

Stop folder redirection on the source server

For more information about stopping folder redirection, search for article 88203, "How to stop Folder Redirection in Windows Server 2003 and in Windows 2000 Server" at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20167), and then follow the instructions in the article.

Prepare Internet Security and Acceleration Server 2004 for migration

Before you proceed with Step 2, verify that ISA Server 2004 with Service Pack 3 (SP3) is installed. You can download SP3 for ISA Server 2004 from the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=104551).

After you install and configure ISA Server 2004 with SP3, you must configure remote procedure call (RPC) filtering.

To configure RPC filtering

  1. To open ISA Server Management, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft ISA Server, and then click ISA Server Management.

  2. In the ISA Server Management console tree, expand Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration Server 2004, expand ServerName, and then click Firewall Policy.

  3. In the details pane, click the SBS Protected Networks Access rule.

  4. On the Tasks tab, click Edit Selected Rule.

  5. On the Protocols tab (for an access rule), click Filtering, and then click Configure RPC Protocol.

  6. On the Protocol tab, clear the Enforce strict RPC compliance check box.

    noteNote
    When you disable the Enforce strict RPC compliance option, DCOM traffic and other RPC protocols are allowed.

Back up the source server

The evening prior to migrating data and settings, you should back up your source server to protect your data from accidental loss in the event that an error occurs during the migration.

To back up the source server

  1. Complete a virus scan of all drives and files on the source server.

  2. After completing the virus scan, complete and verify a full-system backup of the source server, including the System State data and Exchange Server.

    For more information about backing up Windows SBS 2003, see “Backing Up and Restoring Windows Small Business Server 2003” at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=27140).

  3. Verify that the backup ran successfully. To test the integrity of the backup, select random files from your backup, restore them to an alternative location, and then confirm that the backed up files are the same as the original files.

Step 2. Install Windows Small Business Server 2003 and join the domain

In this step, you install Windows SBS 2003 and join the domain by completing the following tasks:

  • Start Windows SBS 2003 Setup on the destination server.

  • Join the destination server to the domain.

  • Install the DNS Server service on the destination server.

  • Promote the destination server to be a global catalog server.

  • Transfer the operations master roles to the destination server.

  • Move the site licensing server to the destination server.

  • Change the DNS server addresses to point to the destination server.

  • Verify that Active Directory objects are replicated on the destination server

  • Back up the Windows SharePoint Services database on the source server.

  • Continue Windows SBS 2003 Setup.

  • Restore the Windows SharePoint Services database on the destination server.

Start Windows Small Business Server 2003 Setup on the destination server

To start the installation process, perform the actions listed in "Step 1: Windows Installation" of Chapter 3A "New Installation" in Getting Started, which is at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20122).

When prompted for the computer name, you must use a standard computer name that is not used by another computer on the network. A standard computer name is a unique name of up to 15 standard characters, which include A–Z, 0–9, and the hyphen (-). The name of the source server and the name of the destination server must be different. After the migration, it is not possible to change the name of the destination server.

ImportantImportant
Do not continue with "Step 2: Windows Configuration" in Getting Started until later. In the Continuing Microsoft Small Business Server Setup dialog box, click Cancel.

Before you continue with the migration process, you must add a static IP address for the destination server and add the DNS server address for the source server to the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) properties of the network adapter on the destination server.

To add the static IP address and the DNS server address

  1. On the destination server, click Start, point to Control Panel, point to Network Connections, right-click the network connection for the local area network, and then click Properties.

  2. Select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then click Properties.

  3. Click Use the following IP address, and then type the static IP address of the destination server.

  4. Click Use the following DNS addresses, and then type the DNS server address of the source server.

  5. Click OK twice.

Ensure that SP2 for Windows Server 2003 is installed. For more information about installing service packs, see Install the most recent service packs earlier in this document.

Windows Firewall is turned on by Windows SBS 2003 Setup, and you must turn off Windows Firewall on the destination server for the migration process to be successful.

To turn off Windows Firewall

  1. On the destination server, click Start, point to Control Panel, point to Network Connections, right-click the network connection for the local area network, and then click Properties.

  2. Click the Advanced tab, and then click Settings.

  3. Click Off, and then click OK.

Join the destination server to the domain

After the operating system is installed, you must join the destination server to the domain. Use the Active Directory Installation Wizard to join the destination server to the domain.

To join the destination server to the domain

  1. On the destination server, click Start, click Run, type dcpromo, and then click OK.

  2. Click Next twice.

  3. Click Additional Domain Controller for an existing domain, and then click Next.

  4. Enter the credentials for the domain administrator account.

  5. In the Domain name text box, type the fully qualified domain name (FQDN) for the Active Directory domain where the domain administrator account is a member, and then click Next.

    For example, type contoso.local.

  6. In the Domain name text box, type the FQDN for which the destination server will become an additional domain controller, and then click Next.

    If you are not sure of the FQDN, you can click Browse to select the correct domain. The domain name that you enter for steps 5 and 6 should be the same.

  7. Click Next to accept the default locations for the Database and Log folders.

  8. Click Next to accept the default location for the shared system volume.

    noteNote
    If you have to change the location of the shared system volume, you must select an NTFS file system volume.

  9. Type the Directory Services Restore Mode administrator password, and then click Next.

    noteNote
    This is the password that you would use in Directory Services Restore Mode or when you use Recovery Console.

  10. In the Summary dialog box, click Next to configure AD DS. This process may take several minutes.

  11. Click Finish, and then click Restart Now.

  12. Log on to the computer after it restarts, and then confirm that the destination server has been successfully promoted to a domain controller. To do this, click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.

  13. At the command prompt, type gettype, and then press Enter. The output should read as follows:

    Host Name: YourDestinationServer

    Name: Windows Server 2003 for Small Business Server

    Version: 5.2 Build 3790 Service Pack 2

    Role: Domain Controller

    Components: Not Installed

  14. Windows Firewall is turned on again after you run the Active Directory Installation Wizard and restart the computer. You must turn off Windows Firewall on the destination server for the migration process to be successful. Perform the following actions to turn off the Windows Firewall:

    1. Click Start, point to Control Panel, point to Network Connections, right-click the network connection for the local area network, and then click Properties.

    2. Click the Advanced tab, and then click Settings.

    3. Click Off, and then click OK.

  15. Use the netdiag.exe, dcdiag.exe, and repadmin.exe tools to verify that the destination server successfully joined the domain. For more information about using these tools, see Verify the health of the source server earlier in this document.

ImportantImportant
The replication process takes at least 15 minutes to finish.

Install the DNS Server service on the destination server

You must install the DNS Server service on the destination server to make the destination server responsible for managing DNS on the network.

To install the DNS Server service on the destination server

  1. On the destination server, click Start, point to Control Panel, and then click Add or Remove Programs.

  2. Click Add/Remove Windows Components.

  3. In the Components list, double-click Networking Services.

  4. Select the Domain Name System (DNS) check box, and then click OK.

  5. Click Next, and then click Finish.

Promote the destination server to be a global catalog server

You must promote the destination server to be a global catalog server before you remove the source server from the network.

To promote the destination server to be a global catalog server

  1. On the destination server, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Active Directory Sites and Services.

  2. Expand Sites, expand Default-First-Site-Name, expand Servers, expand the destination server, right-click NTDS Settings, and then click Properties.

  3. Click the General tab, select the Global Catalog check box to assign the role of global catalog to the destination server, and then click OK.

  4. Open Event Viewer to the Directory Services event log and wait for event 1119 or 1869. This event provides a description that states that this domain controller is now a global catalog server. This event might take several minutes to appear in the event log.

    ImportantImportant
    Do not restart the destination server or remove the global catalog server on the source server until event 1119 or 1869 is logged. If you do, adverse effects will result because there will be no global catalog servers available to process requests.

  5. Restart the destination server.

Transfer the operations master roles to the destination server

The destination server must hold the operations master roles before Windows SBS 2003 Setup can continue. The following table lists the operations master roles that you will transfer to the destination server.

 

Operations Master Role Description

Schema Master

Controls all updates and modifications to the schema.

Domain Naming Master

Controls the addition or removal of domains in the forest.

Infrastructure Master

Responsible for updating references from objects in its domain to objects in other domains.

Relative ID (RID) Master

Responsible for processing RID pool requests from all domain controllers in a particular domain.

Primary Domain Controller (PDC) Emulator

Enables a domain controller to act as the primary domain controller for workstations, member servers, and domain controllers that are running earlier versions of Windows.

Before you can transfer operations master roles, you must connect Active Directory Users and Computers to the domain controller on the destination server.

To connect to the domain controller on the destination server

  1. On the destination server, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Active Directory Users and Computers.

  2. Right-click your Active Directory domain, and then click Connect to Domain Controller.

  3. In the Available Domain Controller box, click the domain controller for the destination server, and then click OK.

After you connect to the domain controller on the destination server, you can transfer the RID master role.

To transfer the RID Master role

  1. With Active Directory Users and Computers open, right-click your Active Directory domain, and then click Operations Master.

  2. Click the RID tab, and then click Change.

  3. Click Yes to confirm that you want to transfer the role, and then click OK.

While the Operations Master dialog box is open, you can transfer the PDC Emulator role.

To transfer the PDC Emulator role

  1. In the Operations Master dialog box, click the PDC tab, and then click Change.

  2. Click Yes to confirm that you want to transfer the role, and then click OK.

And finally, in the Operations Master dialog box, you can transfer the Infrastructure Master role.

To transfer the Infrastructure Master role

  1. In the Operations Master dialog box, click the Infrastructure tab, and then click Change.

    noteNote
    You will be informed that the infrastructure operations master role should not be transferred to a global catalog server. You can ignore this message because it is not applicable to Windows SBS 2003.

  2. Click Yes to confirm that you want to transfer the role, and then click OK.

  3. Click Close.

In Active Directory Domains and Trusts, you will transfer the Domain Naming Master role.

To transfer the Domain Naming Master role

  1. Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Active Directory Domains and Trusts.

  2. Right-click Active Directory Domains and Trusts, and then click Connect to Domain Controller.

  3. In the Available Domain Controller list, click the domain controller for the destination server, and then click OK.

  4. In the console pane of the Active Directory Domains and Trusts window, right-click Active Directory Domains and Trusts, and then click Operations Master.

  5. In the Change Operations Master dialog box, click Change.

  6. Click Yes to confirm that you want to transfer the role, and then click OK.

  7. Click Close.

You will use the Schema Master Tool to transfer the Schema Master role.

To transfer the Schema Master role

  1. You must register the Schema Master Tool as a Microsoft Management Console (MMC) snap-in before you can use it to transfer the role. To register the Schema Master Tool, click Start, click Run, type regsvr32 schmmgmt.dll, and then click OK twice.

  2. Click Start, click Run, type mmc, and then click OK.

  3. Click File, and then click Add/Remove Snap-in.

  4. Click Add.

  5. Click Active Directory Schema, click Add, and then click Close.

  6. In the Add/Remove Snap-in dialog box, click OK.

  7. Select Active Directory Schema, right-click Active Directory Schema, and then click Change Domain Controller.

  8. Under Select DC, click Specify Name, type the name of the destination server, and then click OK.

  9. Right-click Active Directory Schema, and then click Operations Master.

  10. In the Change Schema Master dialog box, click Change.

  11. Click Yes, click OK, and then click Close.

You can use the /v switch for dcdiag.exe to determine that the operations master roles were successfully transferred.

Move the site licensing server to the destination server.

After you transfer the operations master roles to the destination server, you must assign the destination server to be the site licensing server.

To assign the destination server to be the site licensing server

  1. On the destination server, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Active Directory Sites and Services.

  2. Expand Sites, and then click Default-First-Site-Name.

  3. In the details pane, right-click Licensing Site Settings, and then click Properties.

  4. Click Change, type the name of the new destination server in the Enter the object name to select box.

  5. Click OK twice.

Change DNS server addresses to point to the destination server

The DNS server addresses for the network adapters on all Active Directory domain controllers must point to the destination server. You must complete the following procedure on both the destination server and the source server to ensure that both servers are using the DNS Server service that is running on the destination server.

To change DNS server addresses

  1. Click Start, point to Control Panel, point to Network Connections, right-click the network connection for the local area network, and then click Properties.

  2. Select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then click Properties.

  3. Type the IP address of the destination server as the preferred DNS server.

  4. Click OK twice.

Verify that Active Directory objects are replicated on the destination server

Before you can continue with the setup process, you must wait for the Active Directory objects to replicate on the destination server. The time this takes depends on the size of AD DS and on network performance. Windows SBS 2003 Setup will not continue if replication is not finished or if it has failed.

If you want to see if the objects are replicating properly, you can create a new test user on the source server, and then after several minutes, confirm that the object has replicated to the destination server.

You can perform the following procedure to force replication from a source server.

To force replication

  1. Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Active Directory Sites and Services.

  2. In the console pane, expand Default-First-Site-Name, expand Servers, and then expand the server.

  3. Click NTDS Settings. One or more objects are listed in the details pane. One of those objects is a link to the domain controller that you want to replicate. Right-click this domain controller, and then click Replicate Now. The replication is performed immediately.

Back up the Windows SharePoint Services database on the source server

When you complete Windows SBS 2003 Setup, the DNS record for http://companyweb points to the database on the destination server. Before users start adding or modifying information that is stored in the database on the destination server, you need to stop access to the database on the source server, back up the database on the source server, and then after the setup process is complete, use the backup to restore http://companyweb on the destination server.

By setting the database to Read Only, you can stop users from uploading information to http://companyweb folders while the database is being backed up.

To set the database to Read Only

  1. On the source server, click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.

  2. At the command prompt, type:

    osql –E –S %computername%\Sharepoint

  3. At the first Osql prompt, type:

    sp_dboption " DatabaseName ", "Read Only", TRUE

    (DatabaseName is the name of the database that is used to support http://companyweb. The default name for a Windows SBS 2003 database is STS_ServerName_1. The quotation marks are required.)

  4. At the second Osql prompt, type

    go

  5. Type exit.

Before you complete Windows SBS 2003 Setup, you must back up the Windows SharePoint Services database. The backup file that you create will be used immediately after the setup process is complete to restore the database on the destination server.

To back up the Windows SharePoint Services database for http://companyweb

  1. On the source server, click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.

  2. At the command prompt, type the following command, and then press Enter:

    cd %drive%\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\web server extensions\60\BIN

  3. At the command prompt, type the following command, and then press Enter:

    stsadm -o backup -url http://companyweb -filename BackupPath

    (BackupPath is the path of the backup file that you will use to restore the database on the destination server.)

noteNote
You can also use smigrate.exe to back up and restore your Windows SharePoint Services database. Smigrate.exe is located in the same folder as stsadm.exe. For more information about running smigrate.exe, change the directory to %drive%\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\web server extensions\60\BIN, and then type smigrate /?.

If you have additional sites that are not included in http://companyweb, you must also back up those sites before you continue the setup process.

Continue Windows Small Business Server 2003 setup

After joining the destination server to the domain, installing and configuring the DNS Server service, transferring the operations master roles, and transferring the site license server, you must complete the Windows SBS 2003 setup process.

The following information should be considered when you complete the Windows SBS 2003 setup process:

  • The network can support only one DHCP server. Setup will detect the DHCP server on the source server and recommend that you disable the existing DHCP server and install the DHCP server on the destination server. You must click No in the Setup dialog box because you will install and configure DHCP later in the migration process.

  • When prompted for an IP address, do not change it from the static IP address that was entered earlier in the migration process.

  • Ensure that the full DNS name for the internal domain and the NetBIOS domain name are the same for the destination server and the source server. If the full DNS name or the NetBIOS domain name for the source server and destination server are the different, the migration will fail.

  • When you enter the full DNS name for your internal domain, your NetBIOS domain name, the IP address of your local network adapter, and your built-in Administrator account name and password, refer to the information that you collected in “Worksheet 1: Source and Destination Computer Information.”

To continue the setup process

  1. On the desktop of the destination server, double-click Continue Setup, and then click Next.

  2. In the Setup Requirements dialog box, you will be notified that the Directory Services Restore Mode password will be changed and that you must remove the source server from the network when the migration process is complete. Select I acknowledge all warnings, and then click Next.

  3. Complete the remainder of the setup process by performing the actions listed in "Step 2: Windows Configuration" of Chapter 3A "New Installation" in Getting Started, at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20122).

Before you perform the remaining tasks in this document, you should ensure that the most recent service packs are installed on the destination server. For more information about installing service packs, see Install the most recent service packs earlier in this document.

Restore the Windows SharePoint Services database on the destination server

After you complete the setup process, you must copy the backup file of the Windows SharePoint Services database to the destination server and use stsadm.exe to restore the database.

To restore the Windows SharePoint Services database

  1. Copy the backup file from the source server to a folder on the destination server.

  2. On the destination server, click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.

  3. At the command prompt, type the following command, and then press Enter:

    cd %drive%\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\web server extensions\60\BIN

  4. At the command prompt, type the following command, and then press Enter:

    stsadm -o restore -url http://companyweb -filename BackupPath -overwrite

    (BackupPath is the path of the backup file that you will use to restore the database on the destination server.)

Step 3. Transfer Exchange Server 2003 settings and folders

In this step, you transfer Exchange Server 2003 settings and folders to the destination server by completing the following tasks:

  • Verify the integrity of the Exchange Server 2003 database.

  • Replicate all public folders and system folders to the destination server.

  • Replicate the Offline Address Book folder to the destination server.

  • Change the server that is responsible for generating the Offline Address List.

  • Replicate the Schedule+ Free Busy folder to the destination server.

  • Replicate the Organization Forms folder to the destination server.

  • Reassign the Recipient Update Service (RUS) to the destination server.

  • Designate the destination server as the routing group master.

  • Transfer the settings for the Exchange Server 2003 connectors to the destination server.

  • Transfer the settings for the Intelligent Message Filter to the destination server.

  • Move Exchange Server 2003 mailboxes to the destination server.

  • Move Exchange Server 2003 message tracking logs to the destination server.

Before performing the following tasks to transfer Exchange Server 2003 settings, you should ensure that the most recent service pack for Exchange Server 2003 is installed on the destination server. For more information about installing service packs, see Install the most recent service packs earlier in this document.

Verify the integrity of the Exchange Server 2003 database

Before you complete the tasks to migrate Exchange Server 2003 data to the destination server, you should verify the integrity of the Exchange Server 2003 database. You should perform the following actions to clean up and verify the database:

  • Delete and archive e-mail and data. To reduce the time it takes to migrate files and mailboxes, you should request that users on your network delete unnecessary e-mail and files. Users should complete the following tasks to reduce the amount of data that is migrated:

    • Delete any unneeded mail from mailboxes, which includes mail in the Deleted Items and Sent Items folders.

    • Archive older mail to a .pst file, if appropriate. For more information about creating a .pst file, see Help for the Microsoft Outlook® messaging and collaboration client on the client computer.

    • Review and delete unneeded personal documents from the user folder, the Company shared folder, and any other shared folders on the server.

  • Back up the Exchange Server 2003 database. You should back up the database before you proceed. For information about backing up an Exchange Server 2003 database, see "Exchange 2003 Disaster Recovery Operations Guide" at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=91949).

  • Determine the status of the Exchange Server database. You can use the Exchange Server Database Utilities to help you determine the status of the Exchange Server 2003 database. For more information about the utilities, see the "Exchange Server Database Utility Guide" at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=98935).

Replicate all Exchange Server 2003 public folders to the destination server

To ensure that all of the latest data in the public folders on the source server is located on the destination server, you must create replicas on the destination server of all public folders that are located on the source server.

To replicate public folders

  1. On the source server, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

  2. Expand Administrative Groups, and then expand First administrative group.

    noteNote
    If Administrative Groups is not displayed in the console pane, right-click YourExchangeOrganization, click Properties, select the Display administrative groups check box, and then click OK twice.

  3. Expand Folders, and then expand Public Folders.

    noteNote
    After you join the destination server to the domain, duplicate folders exist for your organization's Archive folder and Contacts folder. You only need to create replicas of the Archive folder and Contacts folder that previously existed on the source server. You can determine the folders that previously existed on your source server by opening the Properties dialog box and viewing the Public Folder Store. The Public Folder Store for the original folders reference the source server, not the destination server.

  4. If the folder does not contain subfolders, you can create a replica of the folder by performing the following tasks:

    1. Right click the folder, and then click Properties.

    2. Click the Replication tab, and then click Add.

    3. Select the destination server, and then click OK.

    4. Click Apply, and then click OK.

  5. If the folder contains subfolders, you can create a replica of the top-level folder and all of its subfolders by performing the following tasks:

    1. Right-click the top-level folder, point to All Tasks, and then click Manage Settings.

    2. In the Manage Public Folder Settings Wizard, click Next.

    3. Click Modify lists of replica servers, and then click Next.

    4. Select Add servers, and then click Next.

    5. In the servers list, select the destination server, click Next, and then click Finish.

  6. Repeat step 4 or 5 for all of the folders that you want to replicate.

  7. After replicas have been created on the destination server, you must ensure that the replica folders are synchronized with the source folders. Perform the following steps to ensure that replica folders are synchronized:

    1. In the console pane, click the public folder that you want to verify.

    2. In the details pane, click the Replication tab.

    3. When replication is complete, In Sync is displayed in the Replication Status column.

  8. After you have confirmed that each folder has been replicated, you must remove the replica from the source server. If the folder does not contain any subfolders, perform the following steps to remove the replica:

    1. Right click the folder, and then click Properties.

    2. Click Replication, select the Public Folder Store that represents the source server, and then click Remove.

    3. Click Apply, and then click OK.

  9. To remove a replica from a folder on the source server that contains subfolders, perform the following steps:

    1. Right-click the top-level folder, point to All Tasks, and then click Manage Settings.

    2. In the Manage Public Folder Settings Wizard, click Next.

    3. Click Modify lists of replica servers, and then click Next.

    4. Click Remove servers, and then click Next.

    5. Select the source server, click Next, and then click Finish.

  10. Repeat step 8 or 9 for all folders that were replicated.

Replicate the Offline Address Book folder to the destination server

Users who work offline must download Offline Address Lists to obtain information about other users in their organization. When an administrator creates an Offline Address Book, the address list is converted to a separate set of files and stored in an Exchange Server 2003 public folder. You must create a replica of this folder on the destination server.

To replicate the Offline Address Book folder

  1. On the source server, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

  2. Expand Administrative Groups, and then expand First administrative group.

    noteNote
    If Administrative Groups is not displayed in the console pane, right-click YourExchangeOrganization, click Properties, select the Display administrative groups check box, and then click OK twice.

  3. Expand Folders, right-click Public Folders, and then click View System Folders.

    noteNote
    If you do not see a View System Folders option, you are currently viewing the system folders.

  4. Expand Offline Address Book, and then perform the following tasks:

    1. Right-click /o=YourExchangeOrganization/cn=addrlists/cn=oabs/cn=Default Offline Address List, point to All Tasks, and then click Manage Settings.

    2. In the Manage Public Folder Settings Wizard, click Next.

    3. Click Modify lists of replica servers, and then click Next.

    4. Select Add servers, and then click Next.

    5. In the servers list, select the destination server, click Next, and then click Finish.

  5. After replicas have been created on the destination server, you must ensure that the replica folders are synchronized with the source folders. Perform the following steps to ensure that replica folders are synchronized:

    1. In the console pane, click the public folder that you want to verify.

    2. In the details pane, click the Replication tab.

    3. When replication is complete, In Sync is displayed in the Replication Status column.

  6. After you have confirmed that each folder has been replicated, you must remove the replica from the source server. Perform the following steps to remove the replica:

    1. Right-click /o=YourExchangeOrganization/cn=addrlists/cn=oabs/cn=Default Offline Address List, point to All Tasks, and then click Manage Settings.

    2. In the Manage Public Folder Settings Wizard, click Next.

    3. Click Modify lists of replica servers, and then click Next.

    4. Select Remove servers, and then click Next.

    5. In the servers list, select the source server, click Next, and then click Finish.

Change the server that is responsible for generating the Offline Address List

You must make the destination server responsible for generating the Offline Address List.

To make the destination server responsible for generating the Offline Address List

  1. On the source server, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

  2. In the console pane, expand Recipients, and then click Offline Address Lists.

  3. In the details pane, right-click Default Offline Address List, and then click Properties.

  4. Click Browse, type the name of the destination server in the Enter the object name to select box, and then click Check Names.

  5. If the name that you entered is correct, click OK.

    The destination server is displayed as the Offline Address List server.

  6. In the Default Offline Address List Properties dialog box, click OK. You might have to exit and restart the Exchange System Manager before the change is displayed.

Replicate the Schedule+ Free Busy folder to the destination server

The Schedule+ Free Busy folder contains free or busy data that represents a user's personal availability based on the user's schedule. You must create a replica of this folder on the destination server.

To replicate the Schedule+ Free Busy folder

  1. On the source server, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

  2. Expand Administrative Groups, and then expand First administrative group.

    noteNote
    If Administrative Groups is not displayed in the console pane, right-click YourExchangeOrganization, click Properties, select the Display administrative groups check box, and then click OK twice.

  3. Expand Folders, right-click Public Folders, and then click View System Folders.

    noteNote
    If you do not see a View System Folders option, you are currently viewing system folders.

  4. Expand Schedule+ Free Busy, right-click EX:/o=YourExchangeOrganization/ou=first administrative group, and then click Properties.

  5. Click the Replication tab, and then click Add.

  6. In the Select a Public Store box, select the destination server, and then click OK.

  7. Click Apply, and then click OK.

  8. Repeat steps 4 through 7 for all administrative group folders that you want to replicate.

  9. After replicas have been made on the destination server, ensure that the replica folders are synchronized with the source folders. Perform the following steps to ensure that replica folders are synchronized.

    1. In the console pane, click the public folder that you want to verify.

    2. In the details pane, click the Replication tab.

    3. When replication has completed, In Sync is displayed in the Replication Status column.

  10. After you have confirmed that each folder has been replicated, you must remove the replica from the source server. Perform the following steps to remove the replica.

    1. Expand Public Folders, right-click EX:/o=YourExchangeOrganization/ou=first administrative group, and then click Properties.

    2. Click the Replication tab.

    3. In the Replicate content to these public stores list, click the name of the Public Folder Store that represents the source server, click Remove, click Apply, and then click OK.

  11. Repeat step 10 for all folders that were replicated.

Replicate the Organization Forms folder to the destination server

The Organization Forms folder contains forms for Outlook e-mail messages that are used by everyone. If the source server has the only Organization Forms folder, you must create a replica of the Organization Forms folder on the destination server. If you do not create a replica of this folder, client computers might stop responding when they send non-delivery report (NDR) messages and read-receipt messages.

To replicate the Organization Forms folder

  1. On the source server, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

  2. Expand Administrative Groups, and then expand First administrative group.

    noteNote
    If Administrative Groups is not displayed in the console pane, right-click YourExchangeOrganization, click Properties, select the Display administrative groups check box, and then click OK twice.

  3. Expand Folders, right-click Public Folders, and then click View System Folders.

    noteNote
    If you do not see a View System Folders option, you are currently viewing system folders.

  4. Expand the EFORMS REGISTRY folder. If an Organization Forms folder exists, it appears as a subfolder to the EFORMS REGISTRY folder.

    If an Organization Forms folder does not exist, do not complete the following steps in this procedure.

  5. Right-click the YourOrganizationForms folder, and then click Properties.

    noteNote
    If you receive a message that the mail proxy for this folder was not found, click OK.

  6. Add a replica of this folder to the destination server, ensure that replication is complete, and then remove the replica.

    For more information about how to add a replica of this folder to the destination server, see Replicate all Exchange Server 2003 public folders to the destination server earlier in this document.

Reassign the Recipient Update Service to the destination server

The Recipient Update Service (RUS) is responsible for updating address lists and e-mail addresses in AD DS. When Windows SBS 2003 is installed, two RUS instances are created, one for the domain and one for the enterprise configuration. You must reassign both instances of RUS to the destination server.

To reassign the RUS instances

  1. On the source server, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

  2. Expand Recipients, and then click Recipient Update Services.

  3. Right-click the Recipient Update Service that is hosted on the source server, and then click Properties.

  4. On the General tab (next to Exchange server), click Browse.

  5. Type the name of the destination server in the Enter the object name to select text box, and then click Check Names.

  6. If the name that you entered is correct, click OK.

  7. On the General tab (next to Windows Domain Controller), click Browse.

  8. Type the name of the destination server in the Enter the object name to select text box, and then click Check Names.

  9. If the name that you entered is correct, click OK.

  10. In the Recipient Update Services Properties dialog box, click OK.

  11. Repeat steps 3 through 10 for each RUS instance that is hosted on the source server.

Designate the destination server to be the routing group master

The routing group master tracks the link state information and distributes it to the other servers in the routing group. You must designate the destination server to be the routing group master.

To designate the destination server to be the routing group master

  1. On the source server, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

  2. Expand Routing Groups, and then expand First routing group.

    noteNote
    If Routing Groups is not displayed in the console pane, right-click YourExchangeOrganization, click Properties, select the Display routing groups check box, and then click OK twice. If Administrative Groups is displayed, Routing Groups will be located under Administrative Groups.

  3. In the console pane, click Members.

  4. In the details pane, right-click the destination server, and then click Set as Master.

Transfer the settings for the Exchange Server 2003 connectors to the destination server

The settings for the Exchange Server 2003 connectors do not replicate to the destination server when the server is joined to the domain. You can use the information in “Worksheet 2: SMTP Connector Settings,” to configure the SMTP connector on the destination server.

You can transfer the settings for the POP3 connector by copying the files that are used to store the settings from the source server to the destination server.

To transfer settings for the SMTP connector

  1. On the destination server, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

  2. Expand Routing Groups, and then expand First routing group.

    noteNote
    If Routing Groups is not displayed in the console pane, right-click YourExchangeOrganization, click Properties, select the Display routing groups check box, and then click OK twice. If Administrative Groups is displayed, Routing Groups will be located under Administrative Groups.

  3. Expand Connectors, right-click SmallBusiness SMTP connector, and then click Properties.

  4. Use the information from Worksheet 2 to configure the connector.

To transfer the settings for the POP3 connector, you can copy the files that are used to store the POP3 connector configuration from the source server to the destination server. The files are IMBData.dat and IMBData.bak, and they are in %drive%\Program Files\Microsoft Windows Small Business Server\Networking\POP3.

A worksheet titled “Required Information for Connecting to the Internet” is available in Appendix A of Getting Started at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20122). This worksheet explains how to record the POP3 mailbox information. You can use the recorded information to verify that the POP3 connector files were correctly installed on the destination server.

Transfer the settings for the Intelligent Message Filter to the destination server

If the Intelligent Message Filter was installed on the source server, you must install it on the destination server and then transfer the settings from the source server to the destination server. For more information, see "Exchange Intelligent Message Filter Overview" at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=100144).

Move Exchange Server 2003 mailboxes to the destination server

You must move all user mailboxes and the Administrator mailbox to the destination server before you remove Exchange Server 2003 from the source server. The SMTP mailbox, System Attendant mailbox, and the SystemMailbox mailbox are not moved.

To move Exchange Server 2003 mailboxes for all Windows Small Business Server 2003 users

  1. On the source server, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

  2. Expand Administrative Groups, and then expand First administrative group.

    noteNote
    If Administrative Groups does not appear in the console pane, right-click YourExchangeOrganization, click Properties, select the Display administrative groups check box, click OK twice, and then restart the Exchange System Manager.

  3. Expand Servers, expand the source server, expand First Storage Group, expand Mailbox Store, and then click Mailboxes.

  4. In the details pane, select the mailboxes that you want to move. You can press CTRL and select multiple mailboxes.

  5. Right-click the selected mailboxes, and then click Exchange Tasks.

  6. In the Exchange Task Wizard, click Next.

  7. In the Select a task to perform list, click Move Mailbox, and then click Next.

  8. For the type of move, accept the default of Same Administrative Group Move, and then click Next.

  9. In the Server box, click the destination server.

  10. In the Mailbox Store box, click the Mailbox Store for the destination server.

  11. Click Next.

  12. Configure how you want to handle corrupted messages that are found during the move, and then click Next.

  13. Accept the current date and time in the Begin processing tasks at box to begin the move immediately, and then click Next.

  14. The Task Summary page shows the status of the move operation. Click Finish.

For more information about moving mailboxes, search for article 821829, “Moving Mailboxes in Exchange Server 2003” at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20167).

Transfer the Exchange Server 2003 global settings to the destination server

The global settings in Exchange Server 2003 are not replicated to the destination server when the server is joined to the domain. If you have changed the Internet Message Format properties, Message Delivery properties, and the Mobile Services properties, you can use “Worksheet 3: Exchange Global Settings” to configure the global settings.

To transfer the Exchange Server 2003 global settings

  1. On the destination server, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

  2. Expand Global Settings.

  3. Right-click Internet Message Formats, and then click Properties.

  4. Use the information in the Internet Message Formats Properties section of Worksheet 3 to configure the Internet Message Formats properties, and then click OK.

  5. Right-click Message Delivery, and then click Properties.

  6. Use the information in the Message Delivery Properties section of Worksheet 3 to configure the Message Delivery properties, and then click OK.

  7. Right-click Mobile Services, and then click Properties.

  8. Use the information in the Mobile Services Properties section of Worksheet 3 to configure the Mobile Services properties, and then click OK.

Move Exchange Server 2003 message tracking logs to the destination server

If you want to retain the message tracking logs that exist on the source server, you can move them to the destination server.

To determine the location of the Exchange Server message tracking logs

  1. On the source server, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

  2. Expand Administrative Groups, and then expand First administrative group.

    noteNote
    If Administrative Groups does not appear in the console pane, right-click YourExchangeOrganization, click Properties, select the Display administrative groups check box, click OK twice, and then restart the Exchange System Manager.

  3. Expand Servers, right-click the source server, and then click Properties.

    The location of the message tracking logs is displayed in the Log file directory text box.

  4. Copy the logs from the folder on the source server to the equivalent folder on the destination server.

Step 4. Migrate shared folders and data folders

In this step, you copy shared folders and data folders to the destination server by performing the following tasks:

  • Copy Users Shared Folders to the destination server.

  • Copy additional shared folders, LOB application folders, and general user data folders to the destination server.

Copy Users Shared Folders to the destination server

Copy the Users Shared Folders to the destination server by using the Xcopy command. For more information about Xcopy, type Xcopy /? at the command prompt.

noteNote
Disk quotas are enabled on the destination server for the partition where the Users Shared Folder is located. If you have modified the disk quotas on the source server, you must ensure that disk quotas on the destination server match or exceed the disk quotas that were set on the source server. For more information about modifying the default quotas for all users, on the destination server, click Start, click Help and Support, and then search for “set disk space quotas for all users.”

To copy Users Shared Folders

  1. On the destination server, click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.

  2. At the command prompt, type:

    Xcopy \\ SourceServerName \Users \\ DestinationServerName \Users /e /o /d /h /v /c >> C:\Copyresults.txt

     

    Parameter Description

    SourceServerName

    Specifies the name of your source server.

    DestinationServerName

    Specifies the name of your destination server.

    /e

    Copies all subdirectories, even if they are empty.

    /o

    Copies file ownership and discretionary access control list (DACL) information.

    /d

    Copies only those files that have a source time that is newer than the destination time.

    To copy files changed on or after a specified date, type /d: m-d-y, where m-d-y is the specified date, in month-day-year format.

    /h

    Copies files with hidden and system file attributes. By default, Xcopy does not copy hidden or system files.

    /v

    Verifies each new file.

    /c

    Ignores errors.

    >> C:\Copyresults.txt

    Appends the results of the copy to a file named Copyresults.txt.

    noteNote
    An alternative to Xcopy is RoboCopy, which is available in the Windows Server 2003 Resource Kit Tools at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20249).

  3. You can view C:\Copyresults.txt to verify that the files were copied correctly. You can also compare the number and size of the files that were in the Users Shared Folders on the source server with the number of files that are now on the destination server.

noteNote
If you have custom logon scripts, copy them from the NETLOGON shared folder on the source server to the NETLOGON folder on the destination server. Additionally, if the custom logon scripts reference any files, copy those files to the destination server.

Copy additional shared folders, line-of-business application folders, and general user data folders to the destination server

If you recorded the location of data to move in "Worksheet 4: Location of Data for Line-of-Business Applications and of General User Data,” you can use Xcopy to copy those folders to the destination server.

ImportantImportant
Neither Xcopy nor RoboCopy support migration of encrypted files.

noteNote
In this section, you are only copying the folders; you are not sharing the folders. Instructions for sharing the folders are outlined later in this document.

To copy folders to the destination server

  1. On the destination server, click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.

  2. At the command prompt, type:

    Xcopy \\ SourceServerName \ DriveLetter $\ FolderName DriveLetter :\ FolderName /i /e /o /d /h /v /c >> C:\Copyresults.txt

    (DriveLetter is the letter of the specific drive where the files are located, such as C or D).

  3. Repeat step 2 for additional folders that you want to be located on the destination server.

noteNote
If you copy a folder to the same partition as the Users shared folder, disk quotas will also apply. For more information about modifying the default quotas for all users, on the destination server, click Start, click Help and Support, and then search for “Set disk space quotas for all users.”

Step 5. Install and configure DHCP

Only one DHCP Server service can be active in the Windows SBS 2003 network. The responsibility for managing DHCP must be transferred from the source server to the destination server. In this step, you install and configure DHCP on the destination server by completing the following tasks:

  • Back up DHCP settings on the source server.

  • Disable DHCP on the source server.

  • Install DHCP on the destination server.

  • Migrate DHCP settings to the destination server.

  • Change the DHCP scope options on the destination server.

noteNote
Skip these procedures if you have a router device that provides the DHCP Server service to the local network and you plan to continue using this device as your DHCP server. Ensure that your router is connected to the destination server during Windows SBS 2003 Setup so that DHCP is properly configured on the destination server. For more information, see Appendix C of Getting Started at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20122).

Back up DHCP settings on the source server

Before you disable DHCP on the source server, you must back up the DHCP settings.

To back up DHCP settings

  1. On the source server, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click DHCP.

  2. On the console pane, click your source server.

  3. On the Action menu, click Backup.

  4. In the Browse For Folder dialog box, select the folder where you want to store the backup DHCP database, and then click OK.

    noteNote
    You must choose a local drive for the DHCP database backup folder.

ImportantImportant
Do not store a manually created backup of the DHCP database in the same location as the synchronous backup that the DHCP server creates every 60 minutes, because the automatic backup overwrites the manual backup.

Disable DHCP on the source server

Before DHCP can be installed and configured on the destination server, you must disable DHCP on the source server.

ImportantImportant
Before you disable the DHCP Server service on the source server, ensure that the Domain Admins group is a member of the built-in Administrators group on all of the client computers. If you removed the Domain Admins group for the source server from the built-in Administrators group on any client computer, you must add this group back. By default, the Domain Admins group is added to the built-in Administrators group of the client computer when the client computer is joined to the domain.

To disable DHCP on the source server

  1. On the source server, click Start, click Run, type Services.msc, and then click OK.

  2. Double-click DHCP Server to open Properties, and then click Stop. After the service stops, change Startup Type to Disabled.

  3. Click Apply, and then click OK.

Install DHCP on the destination server

After DHCP has been disabled on the source server, you must install DHCP on the destination server.

To install DHCP on the destination server

  1. On the destination server, click Start, point to Control Panel, and then click Add or Remove Programs.

  2. Click Add/Remove Windows Components.

  3. In the Components list, double-click Networking Services.

  4. Select the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) check box, and then click OK.

  5. Click Next, and then click Finish.

Migrate DHCP settings to the destination server

You can copy the backup files of the DHCP database from the source server to the destination server and restore the DHCP settings on the destination server.

To restore DHCP settings

  1. Copy the backup files for the DHCP database from the source server to the destination server.

  2. On the destination server, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click DHCP.

  3. In the console pane, click your destination server.

  4. On the Action menu, click Restore.

  5. In the Browse For Folder dialog box, select the folder where you copied the backup files for the DHCP database, and then click OK.

  6. Click Yes to stop and restart the DHCP service.

  7. The DHCP server must be authorized in AD DS before it can assign IP addresses. In the console pane, right-click the destination server, and then click Authorize.

Change the DHCP scope options on the destination server

After you install DHCP on the destination server and migrate the DHCP settings, you must change the DHCP scope options.

To change the DHCP scope options

  1. On the destination server, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click DHCP.

  2. Expand Scope, and then click Scope Options.

  3. In the details pane, double-click 006 DNS Servers.

  4. In the IP address box, click the IP address for the source server, and then click Remove.

  5. In the IP address box, type the IP address for the destination server, and then click Add.

  6. Click OK.

  7. If the destination server is the default gateway, repeat steps 3 through 6 for the 003 Router and 044 WINS scope options.

Step 6. Configure Windows Small Business Server 2003 settings

In this step, you configure Windows SBS 2003 settings by completing the following tasks using the To Do List in Server Management:

  • Configure the e-mail and Internet connection.

  • Configure Remote Access.

  • Add a printer.

  • Configure Fax.

  • Configure Backup.

  • Transfer client access licenses to the destination server.

You can use “Worksheet 5: Windows SBS 2003 Settings” to complete the procedures in this step.

Configure the e-mail and Internet connection

To enable client computers to communicate on the network and the Internet, you must run the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard. You can run the wizard from the To Do List in Server Management.

noteNote
If you have antivirus software for your destination server, it is recommended that you install the software before you connect to the Internet.

To configure the e-mail and Internet connection

  1. On the destination server, click Start, and then click Server Management.

  2. In the console pane, click To Do List.

  3. In the details pane, click Connect to the Internet.

  4. Click Next, and then click No. (You will configure the router with the necessary network settings by following instructions later in this document.)

  5. Complete the remainder of the steps in the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard.

noteNote
If you purchased a third-party certificate, you must migrate the certificate from the source server to the destination server.

For more information about connecting to the Internet, see “Connecting to the Internet” in Appendix B of Getting Started at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20122).

Configure Remote Access

To allow dial-in and virtual private networking (VPN) remote access to the network, you must configure Remote Access on the destination server. You can configure Remote Access from the To Do List in Server Management.

To configure Remote Access

  1. On the destination server, click Start, and then click Server Management.

  2. In the console pane, click To Do List.

  3. In the details pane, click Configure Remote Access.

  4. Complete the steps in the Remote Access Wizard by using the Remote Access Settings section of "Worksheet 5: Windows SBS 2003 Settings."

Add a printer

If you had a printer installed on the source server, you should have moved it to the destination server in "Step 2: Install Windows SBS 2003 and Join the Domain." You must configure the printer to work correctly. You can configure a printer from the To Do List in Server Management.

To configure a printer

  1. On the destination server, click Start, and then click Server Management.

  2. In the console pane, click To Do List.

  3. In the details pane, click Add a Printer.

  4. Complete the steps in the Add Printer Wizard by using the Printer Configuration Settings section of "Worksheet 5: Windows SBS 2003 Settings."

Configure Fax

If your source server was configured to send and receive faxes, you must configure the destination server to send and receive faxes. You can configure the destination server to send, receive, and route faxes by using the To Do List in Server Management.

To configure Fax

  1. On the destination server, click Start, and then click Server Management.

  2. In the console pane, click To Do List.

  3. In the details pane, click Configure Fax.

  4. Complete the steps in the Fax Configuration Wizard.

For complete instructions about how to configure and use Fax, see "Step-by-Step Guide for Configuring and Using Fax on Windows Small Business Server 2003" at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=57514).

Configure Backup

If your source server was configured and scheduled to create regular backups, you must configure Backup on the destination server. You can configure Backup from the To Do List in Server Management.

To configure Backup

  1. On the destination server, click Start, and then click Server Management.

  2. In the console pane, click To Do List.

  3. In the details pane, click Configure Backup.

  4. Complete the steps in the Backup Configuration Wizard by using the Backup Configuration Settings section of "Worksheet 5: Windows SBS 2003 Settings."

For more information about backing up Windows SBS 2003, see “Backing Up and Restoring Windows Small Business Server 2003” at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=27140).

Transfer client access licenses to the destination server

If you purchased additional CALs, you must transfer them from the source server to the destination server. Before you transfer CALs to the destination server, you must activate Windows SBS 2003 for the destination server, and because you are transferring licenses you must use the telephone method of activation.

To activate Windows Small Business Server 2003

  1. On the destination server, click Start, point to All Programs, and then click Activate Windows.

  2. In Windows Product Activation, select Yes, I want to telephone a customer service representative to activate Windows.

  3. After you select the appropriate location, you are provided with a telephone number and an installation ID that you can give to the customer service representative to complete the activation process.

After you activate Windows SBS 2003 on the destination server, you can transfer the CALs.

To transfer the CALs

  1. On the destination server, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Licensing. Details about your currently installed CALs appear in the details pane.

  2. In the details pane, click Transfer Licenses to open the Transfer Licenses Wizard, and then follow the wizard instructions.

  3. After completing the wizard, refresh the Licensing console to verify the successful transfer of your CALs.

For more information about transferring CALs, see "Compilation of Activation and Client Access Licensing Help" at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=46577).

Step 7. Migrate Internet Information Services Web sites

In this step, you use the Internet Information Services (IIS) 6.0 Migration Tool to migrate from the source server to the destination server any custom Web sites that were configured with IIS. The IIS 6.0 Migration Tool and its accompanying user documentation are included in the IIS 6.0 Resource Kit Tools, which can be downloaded from the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20161).

noteNote
The IIS 6.0 Migration Tool cannot be used on a source or destination server that is running IIS 6.0 in IIS 5.0 Isolation mode. Your source and destination servers must be running IIS 6.0 in Worker Process Isolation mode.

To migrate an IIS Web site

  1. After you install the IIS 6.0 Migration Tool, on the destination server, click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.

  2. Locate the directory where you installed the IIS 6.0 Migration Tool, and then at the command prompt type:

    iismt SourceServerName WebSiteName

    (WebSiteName is the name that appears in the Web Sites folder in the Internet Information Services Manager.)

  3. Verify that the Web site successfully migrated to the destination server. You can use the log file that was created by the IIS 6.0 Migration Tool to resolve errors. The log file is located in the folder %systemroot%\System32\LogFiles\IISMT\.

  4. Repeat steps 3 and 4 for all Web sites that you want to migrate.

Some Web sites and applications have content that is not located in the home directory of the Web site or in the subdirectories of the home directory. The IIS 6.0 Migration Tool only migrates Web site content from the following locations:

  • Within the home directory and subdirectories of the Web site.

  • In virtual directories with disk volume letters that exist on both the source server and the destination server.

If the code in your applications directly references content that is located outside of the home directory and subdirectories of the Web site, or if a virtual directory is stored on a disk volume letter that does not exist on the destination server, you must migrate this Web site content manually.

For more information about migrating Web sites by using the IIS 6.0 Migration Tool, see "Migrating IIS Web Sites to IIS 6.0" at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=98936).

Step 8. Install and migrate Windows Server Update Services

In this step, you install and migrate Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) by performing the following tasks:

  • Export WSUS update metadata from the source server.

  • Export WSUS configuration settings from the source server.

  • Install WSUS on the destination server.

  • Import WSUS update metadata to the destination server.

  • Import WSUS configuration settings to the destination server.

The tools that are used to migrate WSUS settings are included in the WSUS installation directory and in the Windows Server Update Services API Samples and Tools. You can download these tools from the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=93830).

noteNote
WSUS 2.0 is installed by Windows SBS 2003 R2 Setup. If you have upgraded from WSUS 2.0 to WSUS 3.0 on the source server, you need to upgrade to WSUS 3.0 on the destination server after you complete Windows SBS 2003 R2 Setup. If you have upgraded to WSUS 3.0, you must use Windows Server Update Services API Samples and Tools for WSUS 3.0 to migrate WSUS 3.0 settings. You can download the tools from the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=96138).

The following table lists the tools that are used to migrate WSUS settings.

 

Tool Description

wsusutil.exe

Used to export and import update metadata to and from a package file.

For more information about wsusutil.exe, see "Managing WSUS from the Command Line" at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=98938).

WSUSMigrationExport.exe

Used to export the following WSUS settings:

  • Configuration

  • Computers

  • Target groups

  • Approvals

WSUSMigrationImport.exe

Used to import the settings that were exported with WSUSMigrationExport.exe.

Export Windows Server Update Services update metadata from the source server

Wsusutil.exe is included when WSUS is installed. You can use wsusutil.exe to export the WSUS update metadata from the source server.

To export WSUS update metadata

  1. On the source server, click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.

  2. At the command prompt, type:

    cd %drive%\Program Files\Update Services\Tools

  3. At the command prompt, type:

    wsusutil export PackageFileName .cab LogFileName

    (PackageFileName.cab is the name of the file that will be used to import settings to the destination server, and LogFileName is the name of the log file that is created.)

For more information about the export parameters of wsusutil.exe, type wsusutil help export at the command prompt.

Export Windows Server Update Services configuration settings from the source server

You must also export the configuration, computers, target groups, and approvals from the source server. After you have downloaded the WSUS migration tools that are included in Windows Server Update Services API Samples and Tools, you can use WSUSMigrationExport.exe to export the WSUS configuration settings.

To export WSUS configuration settings

  1. On the source server, click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.

  2. At the command prompt, type:

    cd %drive%\Program Files\Update Services API Samples and Tools\WsusMigrate\WsusMigrationExport

  3. At the command prompt, type:

    WSUSMigrationExport ConfigFileName .xml

    (ConfigFileName.xml is the name of the file that will be used to import settings to the destination server.)

Install Windows Server Update Services on the destination server

WSUS 2.0 is provided with Windows SBS 2003 R2, on the R2 Technologies disc, or you can download it from the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=98940). You must install WSUS 2.0 on the destination server before you can import settings from the source server.

For more information about installing WSUS, see "Step-by-Step Guide to Getting Started with Microsoft Windows Server Update Services 2.0" at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=98941).

Import Windows Server Update Services update metadata to the destination server

The PackageFileName.cab file that you created in the "Export WSUS Update Metadata from the Source Server" section is used to import WSUS update metadata to the destination server.

To import the update metadata

  1. Copy the PackageFileName.cab from the source server to the destination server.

  2. On the destination server, click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.

  3. At the command prompt, type:

    cd %drive%\Program Files\Update Services\Tools

  4. At the command prompt, type:

    wsusutil import PackageFileName .cab LogFileName

    (PackageFileName.cab is the name of the file that will be used to import settings to the destination server, and LogFileName is the name of the log file that is created.)

Importing the update metadata may take several minutes to complete because WSUS synchs with Microsoft Update after the update metadata has been transferred. You do not need to manually copy update files to the destination server.

For more information about the import parameters of wsusutil.exe, type wsusutil help import at the command prompt.

Import Windows Server Update Services configuration settings to the destination server

Use the ConfigFileName.xml that you created in the "Export WSUS Configuration Settings from the Source Server" section to import WSUS configuration settings to the destination server.

To import Windows Server Update Services configuration settings

  1. Copy the ConfigFileName.xml from the source server to the destination server.

  2. On the destination server, click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.

  3. At the command prompt, type:

    cd %drive%\Program Files\Update Services API Samples and Tools\WsusMigrate\WsusMigrationImport

  4. At the command prompt, type:

    WsusMigrationImport ConfigFileName .xml All MoveComputers

    (ConfigFileName.xml is the name of the file that will be used to import settings to the destination server.)

Step 9. Migrate Internet Security and Acceleration Server configuration settings

If your source server is running Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server, you must export the ISA Server configuration settings from the source server, install ISA Server on the destination server, and then import the ISA Server configuration settings to the destination server.

For more information about exporting and importing ISA Server configuration settings, see "Export, Import, and Backup Functionality in ISA Server 2004" at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=99046).

Step 10. Migrate SQL Server databases

If you use SQL Server databases on the source server to support LOB applications, you must migrate your SQL Server databases to the destination server.

noteNote
You should contact your LOB application provider for information related to migrating SQL Server databases that are used with LOB applications.

Search for article 314546, “How to: Move Databases Between Computers that Are Running SQL Server” at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20167), and then follow the instructions in the article.

Step 11. Remove the source server from the network

You can have only one server that is running Windows SBS 2003 on your network, and serving as the domain controller. You have seven days from when you join the destination server to the domain before the source server must be removed from the network. In this step, you remove the source server from the network by performing the following tasks:

  • Start Folder Redirection on the destination server.

  • Share data folders and set permissions on the destination server.

  • Remove Exchange Server 2003 from the source server.

  • Prepare the client computers.

  • Configure the firewall ports on the router.

  • Update the logon scripts.

  • Demote the source server.

  • Retire the source server.

  • Create an alias that maps the source server name to the destination server name.

Start Folder Redirection on the destination server

If you disabled a Folder Redirection Group Policy object in your domain before beginning migration, you need to start Folder Redirection for all users.

To start Folder Redirection

  1. On the destination server, click Start, and then click Server Management.

  2. On the console tree, click Backup.

  3. In the details pane, click Configure My Documents Redirection.

  4. In the Client Document Redirection dialog box, ensure that Redirect all My Documents folders to the default shared folder for users on the Small Business Server is selected, and then click OK.

  5. Click OK to close the Client Document Redirection message box.

Share data folders and set permissions on the destination server

The shared folders that existed on the source server are not migrated, and you must manually create them on the destination server. Before you share the folders on the destination server, you must choose to not share the folder on the source server, and you must ensure that all recent data has been copied to the folders that will be shared.

ImportantImportant
Before you continue with the procedures in this section, ensure that you have recorded the information for the shared folders and the permissions that have been assigned to them in "Worksheet 6: Shared Folder Information."

To choose to not share a folder on the source server

  1. On the source server, use Windows Explorer to browse to the location of the shared folder.

  2. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security.

  3. On the Sharing tab, click Do not share this folder.

  4. Click Apply, and then click OK.

  5. Repeat steps 1 through 4 for all shared folders.

In the time that has elapsed since folders were copied to the destination server, new data has possibly been added to the folders on the source server. To ensure that all recent data exists on the destination server, you must rerun the Xcopy commands that you ran in "Step 4: Migrate Shared Folders and Data Folders." Use the /d parameter to instruct the Xcopy command to only copy files that have a source time that is newer than the destination time.

After you choose to not share folders on the source server and copy the latest data to the destination server, you can share the folders to the destination server.

noteNote
Use the information that you recorded in "Worksheet 6: Shared Folder Information" to share folders and set permissions on the destination server.

To share folders and set permissions on the destination server

  1. On the destination server, use Windows Explorer to browse to the location of the folder.

  2. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security.

  3. On the Sharing tab, click Share this folder.

  4. Click Permissions, and then set the permissions according to those that were recorded for the folder in "Worksheet 6: Shared Folder Information."

  5. In the Share Permissions dialog box, click Apply, and then click OK.

  6. In the Share Properties dialog box, click Apply, and then click OK.

  7. Repeat steps 1 through 6 for all shared folders.

Remove Exchange Server 2003 from the source server

After you have completed the tasks to migrate Exchange Server 2003 folders and settings to the destination server, you must remove Exchange Server 2003 from the source server.

To remove Exchange Server 2003 from the source server

  1. On the source server, click Start, point to Control Panel, and then click Add or Remove Programs.

  2. Click Windows Small Business Server 2003, and then click Change/Remove.

  3. Click Next twice.

  4. On the Component Selection page, in the Action column, select Remove for Exchange Server.

  5. Click Next twice.

noteNote
You will be asked to insert the disc that was used to install Exchange Server 2003.

Create an alias that maps the source server name to the destination server name

To facilitate the appropriate communication between client computers and the destination server, you must create an alias that maps the source server name to the destination server name.

To create an alias

  1. Raise the domain functional level of the destination server to Windows Server 2003, if necessary.

    For information about how to raise the domain function level, see “Raise the domain functional level” at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=141249).

  2. On the destination server, click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.

  3. At the command prompt, type:

    netdom computername DestinationServerName /add: SourceServerName.DomainName .local

    (SourceServerName.DomainName.local is the FQDN of the source server.)

    For more information about using netdom.exe, see "Netdom Overview" at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=98942).

  4. Using the alias that you created, add an entry to the registry to allow SMB connections.

CautionCaution
Incorrectly editing the registry may severely damage your system. Before making changes to the registry, you should back up valued data from the computer.

To add a registry entry

  1. Start Registry Editor and locate the following registry entry:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\lanmanserver\parameters

  2. Right-click parameters, point to New, and then click DWORD Value.

  3. Type DisableStrictNameChecking in the Name column, and then press Enter.

  4. Right-click the DisableStrictNameChecking DWORD value, and then click Modify.

  5. In the Value data box, type 1, and then click OK.

  6. On the File menu, click Exit.

  7. Restart the server.

Prepare the client computers

You must complete tasks on the client computers to ensure that they function correctly when the migration process is complete. Users of Remote Web Workplace must have the Web certificate that is created by the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard installed on their computers. You must also change the Exchange Server setting in Outlook to the name of the destination server.

When you ran the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard, a certificate named sbscert.cer was created in %drive%\ClientApps\SBScert. You must install this certificate on all client computers that will be accessing the server through Remote Web Workplace.

You must also perform the following procedure on all client computers to change the name of the Exchange server in Outlook for all users.

To change the name of the Exchange server

  1. In Outlook, on the Tools menu, click E-mail Accounts.

  2. On the E-mail Accounts dialog box, click View or change existing e-mail accounts.

  3. Click Next.

  4. Select Microsoft Exchange Server, and then click Change.

  5. In the Microsoft Exchange Server text box, type the name of the destination server.

  6. Click Next, and then click Finish.

Configure the firewall ports on the router

If you are using a UPnP™ certified router, you can use the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard to configure the firewall ports on the router that are used by Windows SBS 2003. If you are not using a UPnP certified router, you must manually configure the firewall ports.

To configure firewall ports on the router by using the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard

  1. On the destination server, click Start, and then click Server Management.

  2. In the console pane, click To Do List.

  3. In the details pane, click Connect to the Internet.

  4. Click Next, and then click Yes. The ports will be configured based on the selections that you make in the next steps of the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard.

  5. Complete the remaining steps in the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard.

The ports on some UPnP certified routers might not be configured correctly by using the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard, and some routers are not UPnP certified. For these routers, you must manually configure the ports.

To manually configure the ports, refer to the documentation for your router and to "Configuration Settings for an Existing Firewall Device" in Appendix A of Getting Started, at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20122).

Update the logon scripts

You must change the source server name to the destination server name in the Windows SBS 2003 logon script and any other custom logon scripts that you copied from the source server to the destination server. The logon script for Windows SBS 2003 is SBS_LOGIN_SCRIPT.bat, and it is in %drive%\WINDOWS\SYSVOL\sysvol\DomainName\scripts.

Demote the source server

You must demote the source server from being a domain controller in AD DS. Use the Active Directory Installation Wizard to demote the source server.

To demote the source server

  1. On the source server, click Start, click Run, type dcpromo, and then click OK.

  2. Click Next twice. Do not select This server is the last domain controller in the domain.

  3. In the Summary dialog box, you are informed that Active Directory will be removed from the computer and the server will become a member of the domain. Click Next.

  4. Click Finish.

Retire the source server

It is recommended that you leave the source server disconnected from the network but still available for at least one week to ensure that all necessary data was migrated. If you reformat the source server, you can use the source server as a second server. For more information about second servers for Windows SBS 2003, on the destination server, click Start, click Server Management, click Server Computers, click More Information, and then click Configure additional servers.

Additional references

For more information, see the following resources:

  • For a copy of Getting Started, see the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20122).

  • For more information about the Exchange Migration Wizard, search for article 328871, “How to: Use the Exchange Migration Wizard to Migrate Mailboxes from an Exchange Organization” at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20167). In the article, disregard any information about creating a trust, because this is not necessary for migrating to Windows SBS 2003.

  • For information about troubleshooting migrations, see the Windows SBS 2003 Troubleshooting document at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20282).

  • For the most recent information about Windows SBS 2003, see the Windows Small Business Server Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=16918).

Did you find this helpful?
(1500 characters remaining)
Thank you for your feedback

Community Additions

ADD
Show:
© 2014 Microsoft. All rights reserved.