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Get-Acl

Updated: October 17, 2013

Applies To: Windows PowerShell 4.0

Get-Acl

Gets the security descriptor for a resource, such as a file or registry key.

Syntax

Parameter Set: ByPath
Get-Acl [[-Path] <String[]> ] [-AllCentralAccessPolicies] [-Audit] [-Exclude <String[]> ] [-Filter <String> ] [-Include <String[]> ] [-UseTransaction] [ <CommonParameters>]

Parameter Set: ByInputObject
Get-Acl -InputObject <PSObject> [-AllCentralAccessPolicies] [-Audit] [-Exclude <String[]> ] [-Filter <String> ] [-Include <String[]> ] [-UseTransaction] [ <CommonParameters>]

Parameter Set: ByLiteralPath
Get-Acl [-AllCentralAccessPolicies] [-Audit] [-Exclude <String[]> ] [-Filter <String> ] [-Include <String[]> ] [-LiteralPath <String[]> ] [-UseTransaction] [ <CommonParameters>]




Detailed Description

The Get-Acl cmdlet gets objects that represent the security descriptor of a file or resource. The security descriptor contains the access control lists (ACLs) of the resource. The ACL specifies the permissions that users and user groups have to access the resource.

Beginning in Windows PowerShell 3.0, you can use the InputObject parameter of Get-Acl to get the security descriptor of objects that do not have a path.

Parameters

-Audit

Gets the audit data for the security descriptor from the system access control list (SACL).


Aliases

none

Required?

false

Position?

named

Default Value

none

Accept Pipeline Input?

false

Accept Wildcard Characters?

false

-Exclude<String[]>

Omits the specified items. The value of this parameter qualifies the Path parameter. Enter a path element or pattern, such as "*.txt". Wildcards are permitted.


Aliases

none

Required?

false

Position?

named

Default Value

none

Accept Pipeline Input?

false

Accept Wildcard Characters?

true

-Filter<String>

Specifies a filter in the provider's format or language. The value of this parameter qualifies the Path parameter. The syntax of the filter, including the use of wildcards, depends on the provider. Filters are more efficient than other parameters, because the provider applies them when gettting the objects, rather than having Windows PowerShell filter the objects after they are retrieved.


Aliases

none

Required?

false

Position?

named

Default Value

none

Accept Pipeline Input?

false

Accept Wildcard Characters?

true

-Include<String[]>

Gets only the specified items. The value of this parameter qualifies the Path parameter. Enter a path element or pattern, such as "*.txt". Wildcards are permitted.


Aliases

none

Required?

false

Position?

named

Default Value

none

Accept Pipeline Input?

false

Accept Wildcard Characters?

true

-Path<String[]>

Specifies the path to a resource. Get-Acl gets the security descriptor of the resource indicated by the path. Wildcards are permitted. If you omit the Path parameter, Get-Acl gets the security descriptor of the current directory.

The parameter name ("Path") is optional.


Aliases

none

Required?

false

Position?

1

Default Value

none

Accept Pipeline Input?

true (ByValue, ByPropertyName)

Accept Wildcard Characters?

true

-AllCentralAccessPolicies

Gets information about all central access policies that are enabled on the computer.

Beginning in Windows Server® 2012, administrators can use Active Directory and Group Policy to set central access policies for users and groups. For more information, see "Central Access Policies" at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=238408.

This parameter is introduced in Windows PowerShell 3.0.


Aliases

none

Required?

false

Position?

named

Default Value

False

Accept Pipeline Input?

false

Accept Wildcard Characters?

false

-InputObject<PSObject>

Gets the security descriptor for the specified object. Enter a variable that contains the object or a command that gets the object.

You cannot pipe an object, other than a path, to Get-Acl. Instead, use the InputObject parameter explicitly in the command.

This parameter is introduced in Windows PowerShell 3.0.


Aliases

none

Required?

true

Position?

named

Default Value

none

Accept Pipeline Input?

false

Accept Wildcard Characters?

false

-LiteralPath<String[]>

Specifies the path to a resource. Unlike Path, the value of the LiteralPath parameter is used exactly as it is typed. No characters are interpreted as wildcards. If the path includes escape characters, enclose it in single quotation marks. Single quotation marks tell Windows PowerShell not to interpret any characters as escape sequences.

This parameter is introduced in Windows PowerShell 3.0.


Aliases

none

Required?

false

Position?

named

Default Value

none

Accept Pipeline Input?

true (ByValue, ByPropertyName)

Accept Wildcard Characters?

false

-UseTransaction

Includes the command in the active transaction. This parameter is valid only when a transaction is in progress. For more information, see about_Transactions


Required?

false

Position?

named

Default Value

false

Accept Pipeline Input?

false

Accept Wildcard Characters?

false

<CommonParameters>

This cmdlet supports the common parameters: -Verbose, -Debug, -ErrorAction, -ErrorVariable, -OutBuffer, and -OutVariable. For more information, see  about_CommonParameters (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/p/?LinkID=113216).

Inputs

The input type is the type of the objects that you can pipe to the cmdlet.

  • System.String

    You can pipe a string that contains a path to Get-Acl.


Outputs

The output type is the type of the objects that the cmdlet emits.

  • System.Security.AccessControl

    Get-Acl returns an object that represents the ACLs that it gets. The object type depends upon the ACL type.


Notes

  • By default, Get-Acl displays the Windows PowerShell path to the resource (<provider>::<resource-path>), the owner of the resource, and "Access", a list (array) of the access control entries in the discretionary access control list (DACL) for the resource. The DACL list is controlled by the resource owner.

    When you format the result as a list, ("Get-Acl | Format-List"), in addition to the path, owner, and access list, Windows PowerShell displays the following properties and property values:

    -- Group: The security group of the owner.

    -- Audit: A list (array) of entries in the system access control list (SACL). The SACL specifies the types of access attempts for which Windows generates audit records.

    -- Sddl: The security descriptor of the resource displayed in a single text string in Security Descriptor Definition Language format. Windows PowerShell uses the GetSddlForm method of security descriptors to get this data.

    Because Get-Acl is supported by the file system and registry providers, you can use Get-Acl to view the ACL of file system objects, such as files and directories, and registry objects, such as registry keys and entries.

Examples

-------------------------- EXAMPLE 1 --------------------------

This command gets the security descriptor of the C:Windows directory.


PS C:\> Get-Acl C:\Windows

-------------------------- EXAMPLE 2 --------------------------

This command gets the Windows PowerShell path and SDDL for all of the .log files in the C:\Windows directory whose names begin with "k."

The command uses the Get-Acl cmdlet to get objects representing the security descriptors of each log file. It uses a pipeline operator (|) to send the results to the Format-List cmdlet. The command uses the Property parameter of Format-List to display only the PsPath and SDDL properties of each security descriptor object.

Lists are often used in Windows PowerShell, because long values appear truncated in tables.

The SDDL values are valuable to system administrators, because they are simple text strings that contain all of the information in the security descriptor. As such, they are easy to pass and store, and they can be parsed when needed.


PS C:\> Get-Acl C:\Windows\k*.log | Format-List -Property PSPath, Sddl

-------------------------- EXAMPLE 3 --------------------------

This command gets the security descriptors of the .log files in the C:\Windows directory whose names begin with "k." It uses the Audit parameter to get the audit records from the SACL in the security descriptor. Then it uses theForEach-Object cmdlet to count the number of audit records associated with each file. The result is a list of numbers representing the number of audit records for each log file.


PS C:\> Get-Acl C:/Windows/k*.log -Audit | Foreach-Object { $_.Audit.Count }

-------------------------- EXAMPLE 4 --------------------------

This command uses the Get-Acl cmdlet to get the security descriptor of the Control subkey (HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control) of the registry.

The Path parameter specifies the Control subkey. The pipeline operator (|) passes the security descriptor that Get-Acl gets to the Format-List command, which formats the properties of the security descriptor as a list so that they are easy to read.


PS C:\> Get-Acl -Path HKLM:\System\CurrentControlSet\Control | Format-List

Example 5

This command uses the InputObject parameter of Get-Acl to get the security descriptor of a storage subsystem object.


PS C:\> Get-Acl -InputObject (Get-StorageSubsystem -Name S087)

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