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Migrate File and Storage Services to Windows Server 2012

Updated: June 24, 2013

Applies To: Windows Server 2012



The File and Storage Services Migration Guide provides step-by-step instructions for how to migrate the File and Storage Services role, including data, shared folders, and operating system settings from a source server to a destination server that is running Windows Server 2012.

noteNote
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Migration documentation and tools ease the migration of server role settings and data from an existing server to a destination server that is running Windows Server 2012. By using the tools that are described in this guide, you can simplify the migration process, reduce migration time, increase the accuracy of the migration process, and help to eliminate possible conflicts that might otherwise occur during the migration process. For more information about installing and using the migration tools on both source and destination servers, see the Windows Server Migration Tools Installation, Access, and Removal Guide.

Specifically, this guide includes information about migrating the following:

  • Information about the server’s identity

  • Local users and groups

  • Data and shared folders

  • Shadow Copies of Shared Folders

  • Data Deduplication

  • DFS Namespaces

  • DFS Replication

  • File Server Resource Manager (FSRM)

  • Group Policy settings that are specific to server message block (SMB)

  • Group Policy settings for Offline Files (also known as client-side caching or CSC)

  • ISCSI Software Target

    noteNote
    ISCSI Software Target was previously an optional Windows Server and Windows Storage Server component download. Due to the amount of content, all iSCSI-specific migration information is located in File and Storage Services: Appendix C: Migrate iSCSI Software Target.

This document is intended for information technology (IT) professionals and knowledge workers who are responsible for operating and deploying file servers in a managed environment.

This guide does not provide information or support for the following migration scenarios:

  • Clustering migration for clustered server configurations

  • Migrating Roaming User Profiles (for additional information see Upgrading or Migrating a Roaming User Profiles Environment to Windows 8.1 or Windows Server 2012 R2).

  • Upgrading roles on the same computer

  • Migrating more than one server role

  • Migrating data across subnets

  • Migrating Network File System (NFS) shared folders

  • Migrating file servers by using File Server Resource Manager

  • Migrating encrypted files from Encrypting File System (EFS)

  • Migrating file allocation tables (FAT) and FAT32 file systems

  • Migrating hardware and software installation for storage resources

In addition to these unsupported scenarios, you should understand the following migration limitations:

  • If the hard disk drive that contains your data is physically moved from the source server to the destination server, file and folder permissions for local users are not preserved.

  • Reparse points, hard links, and mounted volumes are not migrated when data is copied, and they need to be migrated manually.

  • To facilitate migrating file and shared folder permissions, you must migrate local users and groups as part of the migration procedure. However, not all user and group attributes are migrated.

    For more information about the attributes of local users and groups that can be migrated, see the Local User and Group Migration Guide (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=258341) on the Microsoft Web site.

This guide provides instructions for migrating an existing server that is running File and Storage Services to a server that is running Windows Server 2012 R2 or Windows Server 2012. This guide does not contain instructions for migration when the source server is running multiple roles. If your server is running multiple roles, it is recommended that you design a custom migration procedure for your server environment, based on the information that is provided in other server role migration guides. Migration guides for additional roles are available on the Windows Server Migration Portal.

CautionCaution
If your source server is running multiple roles, some migration steps in this guide, such as those for computer name and IP configuration, can cause other server roles that are running on the source server to fail.

Supported migration scenarios include the following configurations or features:

  • File server is joined to a domain

  • File server is in a workgroup

  • File server data and file shares are located in a storage area network (SAN) or other external storage location that preserves data and file share permissions (except data for local users and groups).

  • File server data and file shares are located on the server disk (direct-attached storage) that is preserving data and files shares permissions.

  • DFS Namespaces

  • File Server Resource Manager

  • Shadow Copies of Shared Folders

ImportantImportant
The file migration portion of the Windows Server Migration Tools is designed for smaller data sets (under 100 GB of data). It copies files one at a time over HTTPS. For larger datasets, we recommend using the version of Robocopy.exe included with Windows Server 2012 R2 or Windows Server 2012.

 

Source server processor Source server operating system Destination server operating system Destination server processor

x86- or x64-based

Windows Server 2003 with Service Pack 2

Windows Server 2008 R2 or Windows Server 2012, both full and Server Core installation options

x64-based

x86- or x64-based

Windows Server 2003 R2

Windows Server 2008 R2or Windows Server 2012, both full and Server Core installation options

x64-based

x86- or x64-based

Windows Server 2008, full installation option

Windows Server 2008 R2or Windows Server 2012, both full and Server Core installation options

x64-based

x64-based

Windows Server 2008 R2

Windows Server 2008 R2or Windows Server 2012, both full and Server Core installation options

x64-based

x64-based

Server Core installation option of Windows Server 2008 R2

Windows Server 2008 R2or Windows Server 2012, both full and Server Core installation options

x64-based

x64-based

Server Core and full installation options of Windows Server 2012

Windows Server 2008 R2or Windows Server 2012, both full and Server Core installation options

x64-based

The versions of operating systems shown in the preceding table are the oldest combinations of operating systems and service packs that are supported. Newer service packs, if available, are supported.

Foundation, Standard, Enterprise, and Datacenter editions of Windows Server are supported as either source or destination servers.

Migrations between physical operating systems and virtual operating systems are supported.

Migration from a source server to a destination server that is running an operating system in a different system UI language (that is, the installed language) than the source server is not supported. For example, you cannot use Windows Server Migration Tools to migrate roles, operating system settings, data, or shares from a computer that is running Windows Server 2008 in the French system UI language to a computer that is running Windows Server 2012 in the German system UI language.

noteNote
The system UI language is the language of the localized installation package that was used to set up the Windows operating system.

Both x86- and x64-based migrations are supported for Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2008 R2. All editions of Windows Server 2008 R2 are x64-based.

The following topics contain step-by-step information about how to migrate File and Storage Services from a computer that is running Windows Server 2003 or later to a computer that is running Windows Server 2012:

The content in this section describes the impact to the computers in your enterprise during migration.

  • The performance of your source server can be affected during the data migration. This can result in slower access to files that are stored on the server.

  • At the beginning of the second phase of the data migration, all open files are closed, which can lead to data loss.

  • During the second phase of data migration, clients are unable to access the file server.

Clients cannot access the file server from the moment the storage device is disconnected from the source server until it is attached to the destination server.

The DFS Namespaces are unavailable at several times during the migration process. You should plan your migration when you can take the namespace that is hosted on the source server offline.

The impact of migration activity on other servers in the enterprise depends largely on the configuration of the replication topology. Typically, DFS Replication is configured in a hub and spoke replication topology with multiple branch office servers (spokes) replicating with a single hub server. Depending on which server in the replication topology is migrated, and how the data is migrated, the remaining servers in the enterprise can be affected. Client workstations that are accessing data that is contained in the replicated folder on the server can be affected during the migration process.

Client computers may be accessing data in the folder that is being replicated by using DFS Replication. The replicated folder is often exposed to client computers as an SMB shared folder.

For more information about the impact of the migration process on client computers, see Impact of data migration by copying data and shared folders earlier in this document.

This section describes permissions that are required to perform the migration.

For data and shared folder migration, local Administrator permissions are required on the source server and destination server.

This section describes permissions that are required to perform the migration on the destination server.

For a stand-alone namespace, the user must be a member of the local Administrators group on the destination server.

There are three permissions options for a domain-based namespace:

  • Option 1: Membership in the Domain Admins group

  • Option 2 (if there are more than one namespace server):

    • Permission to administer all namespaces that are hosted on the source server

    • Member of the local Administrators group on the destination server

  • Option 3 (if there is a single namespace server):

    • Permission to delete and create domain-based namespaces in the domain

    • Member of the local Administrators group on the destination server

This section describes permissions that are required to perform the migration on the source server.

For a stand-alone namespace, the user must have membership in the local Administrators group on the source server.

There are three permissions options for a domain-based namespace:

  • Option 1: Membership in the Domain Admins group

  • Option 2 (if there are more than one namespace servers):

    • Permission to administer the all namespaces that are hosted on the source server

    • Member of the local Administrators group on the source server

  • Option 3 (if there is a single namespace server):

    • Permission to delete and create domain-based namespaces in the domain

    • Member of the local Administrators group on the destination server

For DFS Replication, the user who starts the migration must be a member of the Domain Admins group or delegated permissions to the replication groups and replication members. This permission is required to remove the source server from replication groups to which it belongs. If the permissions to administer a replication group have been delegated to a particular user through the DFS Management snap-in, that user can use the DFS Management snap-in to perform tasks such as removing the source server from a replication group. The user must also be a member of the local Administrators group on the source server and the destination server.

See Also

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