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Print Services Migration Guide

Publicado: Abril de 2009

Actualizado: Março de 2010

Aplica-se a: Windows Server 2008 R2

This document provides guidance to migrate a print server running Windows Server® 2003 or Windows Server 2008 operating systems to a server running the Windows Server 2008 R2 operating system with the Serviços de impressão e documentação role installed. This includes cross-architecture and stand-alone migrations, as well as configurations for a server in a cluster. This document provides step-by-step instructions for migrating from old hardware to new hardware and consolidating print servers.

Serviços de impressão e documentação enables print server tools and configures the server to act as a print server. Serviços de impressão e documentação is not dependent on any other features or roles. However, some specific network configurations, clients, and hardware may require you to install additional features or enable certain services. Serviços de impressão e documentação was known as Serviços de impressão in Windows Server 2008. The name change reflects the role’s expanded capabilities for managing scanners and scanned documents.

This guide provides you with instructions for migrating an existing print server to a server that is running Windows Server 2008 R2. This guide does not contain instructions for migration when the source server is running multiple roles. If your server is running multiple roles, we recommend that you design a custom migration procedure specific to your server environment, based on the information provided in other role migration guides. Migration guides for additional roles are available in the Windows Server 2008 TechCenter (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=128554).

CautionCuidado
If your source server is running multiple roles, some migration steps in this guide, such as those for computer name and IP configuration, can cause other roles that are running on the source server to fail.

To manage the migration process, use one of the following:

  • The Printer Migration Wizard, which you access through Print Management, a snap-in in Microsoft Management Console (MMC).

  • The Printbrm.exe command-line tool.

For more information about installing and using these tools, see Access the migration tools.

noteNota
The Print Management snap-in is not available in Windows Server 2003. However, it is available in Windows Vista® Enterprise and Windows Vista Ultimate, which enables you to migrate from Windows Server 2003. It is also available in Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2. For more information about migrating from Windows Server 2003, see Print Services Migration: Preparing to Migrate.

The Print Management snap-in and the Printbrm.exe command-line tool are not available for the Server Core installation option. To migrate from a print server running on a Server Core installation, use a server running the Printer Migration Wizard, Windows Vista Enterprise, or Windows Vista Ultimate. For more information about migrating from a server running a Server Core installation, see Print Services Migration: Preparing to Migrate.

There is no equivalent to Serviços de impressão e documentação for Windows® client operating systems.

You can migrate Serviços de impressão e documentação from the destination server or from any client with the following:

  • The Printer Migration Wizard (provided that the client is running one of the supported operating systems listed in the Supported operating systems matrix).

  • Remote access to the destination server.

  • Access to the printer settings file created when you back up the source server.

noteNota
All commands in this guide are case-insensitive unless specifically noted.

This guide is designed as a step-by-step tutorial for migrating print servers.

This document is intended for IT administrators and other knowledge workers who are responsible for the operation and deployment of print servers in a managed environment.

This document does not provide guidance for the following:

  • Upgrading roles on the same computer

  • Migrating printer configurations during client installations of Windows

  • Migrating settings for a server that is not being used as a print server

  • Recovering server information that was not properly saved prior to migration for in-place upgrades

  • Instructions for migrating more than Serviços de impressão e documentação

You must have access to the Printer Migration Wizard to migrate print servers. For more information about supported scenarios and limitations, see Print Services Migration: Preparing to Migrate.

The following table outlines the supported operating systems for migration.

 

Source server processor Source server operating system Destination server operating system Destination server processor

x86- or x64-based

Windows Server 2003 with Service Pack 2

Windows Server 2008 R2, both full and Server Core installation options

x64-based

x86- or x64-based

Windows Server 2003 R2

Windows Server 2008 R2, both full and Server Core installation options

x64-based

x86- or x64-based

Windows Server 2008, both full and Server Core installation options

Windows Server 2008 R2, both full and Server Core installation options

x64-based

x64-based

Windows Server 2008 R2

Windows Server 2008 R2, both full and Server Core installation options

x64-based

x64-based

Server Core installation option of Windows Server 2008 R2

Windows Server 2008 R2, both full and Server Core installation options

x64-based

The versions of operating systems shown in the preceding table are the oldest combinations of operating systems and service packs that are supported. Newer service packs, if available, are supported.

The Foundation, Standard, Enterprise, and Datacenter editions of Windows Server are supported on both full and Server Core installation options, as either source or destination servers.

All versions of Windows Server 2008 R2 are x64-based. Migrating to an x86-based server is not supported.

Migrations between physical operating systems and virtual operating systems are supported.

noteNota
Both x86-based and x64-based migrations are supported for Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2008. All editions of Windows Server 2008 R2 are x64-based.

You might prefer the migration process, rather than an upgrade, even when the hardware is native x64-based. An example would be a case where there is increased use of the server and there is a server role split (in which the source server has more than one server role)—and you decide to separate the roles onto several additional x64-based servers. In this case, migration of individual server roles to other servers might be the best solution.

The server administrator can choose which components of an existing installation to migrate, but along with the server role, these components usually include configuration, data, system identity, and operating system settings. For both source and destination environments, the Windows Server 2008 Standard, Windows Server 2008 Enterprise, and Windows Server 2008 Datacenter operating systems are supported on both full and Server Core installations.

Migration from a source server to a destination server that is running an operating system in a different system UI language (that is, the installed language) than the source server is not supported. For example, you cannot use Windows Server Migration Tools to migrate roles, operating system settings, data, or shares from a computer that is running Windows Server 2008 in the French language to a computer that is running Windows Server 2008 R2 in the German language.

noteNota
The system UI language is the language of the localized installation package that was used to set up the Windows operating system.

Cross-architecture migration (such as migrating from an x86-based server to an x64-based server) is supported. The source server must have print queue drivers installed for both the source and destination server architectures. If a print queue does not have a driver for the destination server architecture, then it will not be migrated. Similarly, verify that the destination server contains drivers for each supported architecture.

The Supported operating systems matrix provides a complete listing of the supported migration scenarios.

Some migration scenarios require additional preparation. For more information about these scenarios, see Print Services Migration: Appendix B - Additional Destination Server Scenarios.

The Printer Migration Wizard migrates:

  • Print queues.

  • Shared printer settings.

  • Printer drivers in use by the print spooler.

  • Any security settings specific to the installed printer.

As a best practice, when migrating from x86-based to x64-based drivers:

  1. Verify that x64-based versions of the drivers are available.

  2. If you are unable to verify their availability, back up the source server before the migration.

  3. Install the x64-based drivers on the source server so that you can determine if there any problems or conflicts before the migration process.

  4. If there are conflicts or problems on the destination server after the migration, roll back the migration. For more information, see “Roll back migration on the source server” in Print Services Migration: Post-Migration Tasks.

The Printer Migration Wizard does not migrate the following:

  • Other services or settings that specific printers may rely on, such as Line Printer Remote (LPR), Internet Printer Protocol (IPP), or Web Services on Devices (WSD). You must enable or install these features before restoring the source print server configuration. For additional information, see “Roll back migration on the source server” in Print Services Migration: Post-Migration Tasks.

  • Local bus printers (LPT and USB), although they are shown during backup. For additional information, see Print Services Migration: Appendix B - Additional Destination Server Scenarios.

  • Plug and play printers. However, plug and play printer drivers will be migrated. For additional information, see Print Services Migration: Appendix B - Additional Destination Server Scenarios.

  • Any print jobs currently in the printer queue.

  • Any system or print administrators, or permissions. If you want to retain the same system or print administrators on the destination server as on the source server, you will need to manually add these administrators to the destination server.

While the original server is still running, use the Printer Migration Wizard or the Printbrm.exe command-line tool to export or back up the print information (such as settings, queues, and drivers) in a printer settings file. Then, import or restore this backup image to a destination server running Windows Server 2008 R2 that has been configured to run as a print server.

Some migration scenarios require additional preparation. For more information about these scenarios, see Print Services Migration: Appendix B - Additional Destination Server Scenarios.

To migrate printers from a server running Windows Server 2003 or a Server Core installation to a server running Windows Server 2008 R2, you must use a computer running the Printer Migration Wizard to remotely manage the server running Windows Server 2003 or a Server Core installation. Using this computer, you can store the printer settings file (containing information about the printers you want to migrate, such as settings, queues, and drivers) from the server running Windows Server 2003 or a Server Core installation to a file share. You can then use the Printer Migration Wizard to migrate the printers from the file share to the server running Windows Server 2008 R2.

For more information about accessing the Printer Migration Wizard, see Print Services Migration: Preparing to Migrate.

noteNota
The Printing-Server Core role must be installed on a server running a Server Core installation from which you want to migrate.

The objective of the migration process is that the destination server is able to perform the same functions as the source server did, without client computers on the network being aware that the migration has taken place. The following sections describe the impact of migration.

The source server is not impacted by print server migration until the destination server takes over as the active server (typically when the name or IP address of the source server is assigned to the destination server).  At that point, the source server no longer services print requests that target the print server.

If the destination server replaces the source server in the network (same name or IP address), then there should be no impact to other computers in the enterprise.

If the destination server has a different name or IP address than the source server, then all clients with existing print connections must delete and recreate those print connections so that they target the destination server.

Administrative permissions are required on both the source print server and the destination print server.

If the destination server replaces the source server in the network, then no permissions are required on other computers in the enterprise. If the destination server has a different name or IP address, then the permissions required on other computers may vary depending on Group Policy settings, Windows Update access, and driver availability.

The time required to migrate a print server will vary from server to server, depending on the following:

  • The number of queues being migrated.

  • The number of individual drivers needed for the queue.

  • The size of a given driver, in terms of its file size and the number of files.

  • The configuration of the server.

Migrating a single printer queue with a typical x86-based and x64-based driver can range from five seconds to several minutes, depending on the factors listed above. Because of this range, a typical migration can take anywhere from less than an hour to several hours.

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