Message Queuing Servers

Updated: June 25, 2007

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

For the purposes of this documentation, the term Message Queuing server refers to a Windows Server 2008 R2 Server family computer that has Message Queuing installed on it. The term Message Queuing client can refer to either an independent client, or a dependent client. Both of these terms are used to describe Message Queuing servers that have particular Message Queuing components installed, and such computers are referred to as having independent client functionality, or dependent client functionality.

Message Queuing servers installed on a Windows Server 2008 R2 Server family computer also provide the following features:

  • Directory access for all Windows 2000 client computers running Message Queuing in a Windows Server 2008 family domain, Windows Server 2003 family domain or Windows 2000 domain.

    noteNote
    The Windows 2000 Client Support feature has been removed from Message Queuing 5.0. To support message queuing on Windows 2000 down-level clients, at least one Windows Server 2003 or Windows Server 2008 domain controller with Windows 2000 Client Support feature must be configured in the domain.

  • Support for dependent clients.

  • Routing capabilities.

Message Queuing servers enable client computers running Message Queuing 2.0 on Windows 2000 computers to view and change information listed in Active Directory Domain Services. To do this, the Message Queuing Windows 2000 Client Support feature must be installed on a Windows Server 2008 family domain controller.

noteNote
The Windows 2000 Client Support feature has been removed from Message Queuing 5.0. To support message queuing on Windows 2000 down-level clients, at least one Windows Server 2003 or Windows Server 2008 domain controller with Windows 2000 Client Support feature must be configured in the domain.

Message Queuing independent clients running on Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, or Windows Server 2003 family computers can access Active Directory Domain Services directly without the aid of a Message Queuing server.

Message Queuing servers installed with routing services enabled provide message routing and intermediate store-and-forward message queuing. Such Message Queuing servers can route messages within a site or between different sites when there is no direct connectivity between client computers. Message Queuing servers that provide message routing functions within the same site are called in-routing servers (InRS) or out-routing servers (OutRS). Intersite connectivity is defined by a routing link. A server through which the message traffic from one site to another can be configured to pass in a routing link is called a site gate. A site gate can belong to either or both of the sites connected by a routing link. A routing link can be configured with any number of site gates or no site gate. For more information, see Routing with Message Queuing Servers.

For information about sites, see Deploying in a Domain Environment.

Every dependent client in your network needs a supporting server, which can be any Message Queuing server running on Windows Server 2008 or later. By default, following installation, Message Queuing servers are not enabled to support dependent clients. For instructions on enabling a Message Queuing server to act as a supporting server, see Enable a Supporting Server for Dependent Clients.

noteNote
Message Queuing 5.0 clients cannot be installed as dependent clients, this functionality has been deprecated. Message Queuing 5.0 independent clients can, however, be configured as a supporting server for earlier versions of Message Queuing installed as dependent clients.

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