Event ID 32774 — Lookup Procedures

Updated: November 25, 2009

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

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The Local Security Authority (LSA) policy provides a software interface for other software components when they query mappings between account names and security identifiers (SIDs) within the local domain and in trusted domains.

Event Details

Product: Windows Operating System
ID: 32774
Source: LsaSrv
Version: 6.0
Symbolic Name: LSAEVENT_LOOKUP_SC_HANDLE_FAILED
Message: A lookup request was made that required connectivity to the domain controller %1. The local LSA was unable to contact the LSA on the remote domain controller. Please check connectivity and secure channel setup from this domain controller to the domain controller %2.

Resolve

Test connectivity to the domain controller

A connection to a domain controller in the trusting domain could not be made. To resolve this issue, determine the name of a domain controller in the trusting domain, and then verify connectivity with that domain controller. Perform the following procedure using the computer that is logging the event to be resolved.

To perform this procedure, you must have membership in Enterprise Admins, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority.

To locate a domain controller in the trusting domain and test connectivity:

  1. Open a command prompt as an administrator on the local computer. To open a command prompt as an administrator, click Start. In Start Search, type Command Prompt. At the top of the Start Menu, right-click Command Prompt, and then click Run as administrator. If the User Account Control dialog box appears, confirm that the action it displays is what you want, and then click Continue.
  2. At the command prompt, type nltest /dsgetdc:TrustingDomainName, and then press ENTER. Substitute the name of the domain that trusts this domain for TrustingDomainName. The output from the command indicates the name of the domain controller (at the DC line).
  3. To test connectivity to the domain controller server, type net use \\TrustingDCname, and then press ENTER. Substitute the name of the domain controller in the trusting domain for TrustingDCname. If your local computer can connect to the domain controller, the command output is the following: "The command completed successfully."

If either of the commands fails to connect to the domain controller, make sure that the domain controller is running and that it is connected to the network. If you cannot establish a connection to the remote computer, check the network infrastructure for communication issues.

For information about configuring and troubleshooting TCP/IP, see Chapter 16 - Troubleshooting TCP/IP (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=109262) and Windows Server 2003 TCP/IP Troubleshooting (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=109264).

Verify

To verify that security identifier (SID) and name lookup operations are functioning properly, you must have a utility that can translate account names to SIDs. PsTools from Microsoft includes the PsGetSid utility, which translates account names to SIDs and SIDs to account names. Perform the following procedures using a computer that is a member of the domain.

To perform these procedures, you must have membership in Domain Admins, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority.

Obtain and extract PsTools

To obtain and extract PsTools:

  1. Download PsTools (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=87333).
  2. Extract PsTools.zip from your download folder to a new folder named PsTools. For example, to extract PsTools.zip to a PsTools folder on the C: drive, right-click the PsTools.zip file, and then click Extract All. In the Extraction Wizard, click Next. In Files will be extracted to this directory, type C:\PsTools, and then click Extract.
  3. Close the extraction destination folder (C:\PsTools), which automatically opens in a new window when the extraction is complete.

Verify that lookup operations succeed

To verify that lookup operations succeed:

  1. Open a command prompt as an administrator. To open a command prompt as an administrator, click Start. In Start Search, type Command Prompt. At the top of the Start Menu, right-click Command Prompt, and then click Run as administrator. If the User Account Control dialog box appears, confirm that the action it displays is what you want, and then click Continue.
  2. Change the directory path to the folder where you extracted PsTools. For example, if you extracted PsTools to the C:\PsTools folder, type cd /d c:\pstools, and then press ENTER.
  3. Type the command net config rdr, and then press ENTER. In the resulting command output, note the Workstation domain name, which is used in the following command.
  4. Type psgetsid domainname\guest, and then press ENTER, where domainname is the Workstation domain name in the output from the previous command:
    • If this is the first time that you have run psgetsid on this computer, the PsGetSid License Agreement appears. Read the license agreement. If you agree to the terms, click Agree. If you do not agree to the terms, you cannot verify lookup using PsGetSid or continue with the following directions.
    • The output from this command displays the SID of the guest account for the domain. This SID starts with S-1-5-21 and ends with -501. The domain guest account SID is used in the following command.
  5. Type psgetsid dgsid, where dgsid is the domain guest account SID that is displayed by the previous command, and then press ENTER. The output of the command translates the SID to the name of the domain guest account.
  6. Type hostname, and then press ENTER. The output of the command displays the local computer name, which is used in the following command.
  7. Type psgetsid hostname\guest, and then press ENTER, where hostname is the name of the local computer that appears after you run the hostname command. The output from this command displays the SID of the guest account for the local computer. The local guest account SID starts with S-1-5-21 and ends with -501, but it should have a different set of digits between S-1-5-21 and -501 than the domain guest account SID. The local computer guest account SID is used in the following command.
  8. Type psgetsid lgsid, where lgsid is the local computer guest account SID that is displayed by the command that you ran in the previous step, and then press ENTER. The command output translates the SID to the name of the local computer guest account.

If the previous commands execute without error, the lookup operations are functioning successfully.

Related Management Information

Lookup Procedures

Active Directory

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