Troubleshooting Process

Updated: April 8, 2009

Applies To: Windows 7, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows Server 2003 with SP1, Windows Server 2003 with SP2, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 Foundation, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, Windows Vista

The first level of troubleshooting is provided in the Help files that are included with your connection profile. This troubleshooting Help information makes it possible for many problems to be resolved directly for the user. Each problem that cannot be resolved leads to a Help topic that instructs the user to call customer support. You should customize this Help topic with a phone number for your customer support group, additional information specific to your service, and other information that may help your users.

To resolve problems most effectively:

  1. Make sure that all system requirements have been met.

  2. Make sure that the right access numbers are used and that they are entered appropriately. Verify that the users understand that dialing rules are applied only to numbers selected from a phone book. If a number is typed or edited by the user, the user must then type all dialing information, including information such as long-distance and external access numbers. If the user chooses to use dialing rules, the user must configure those dialing rules appropriately for the location.

  3. Make sure that users know how to access the Connection Manager troubleshooter Help, and verify the path that they have taken through the troubleshooter Help.

  4. Check the appropriate readme files (including CMAKRead.htm) to determine if the problem is a known issue.

  5. Look for common mistakes. Make sure that:

    • The modem is on.

    • The appropriate version of Connection Manager is installed. To determine this, instruct your users to check the log file.

    • The latest version of the appropriate connection software is installed.

    • The latest service pack is installed.

    • The Internet Explorer proxy settings are correct.

    • All required network protocols are installed and configured correctly on the user's computer. (If the user can get to the network but cannot reach any services, a protocol on the user's computer may be misconfigured.)

    • The dial-up entry used is appropriate for the user’s operating system.

    • If a user is using Internet Connection Sharing, Internet Connection Firewall, or Windows Firewall, the connection is shared correctly, and the firewall is not blocking the connection.

  6. Ask users to generate and send a log file for the connection. The log file contains valuable troubleshooting information. Logging is typically enabled by default. Users can enable or disable logging after the profile is installed.

    • If logging was enabled, instruct the user to send the log file. Make sure that the user did not turn off logging. Depending on the size of the log file, decide whether you want the user to clear the log file and try the connection again before sending the log file. To direct the user to the log file, instruct the user to click Properties on the Connection Manager logon screen. Instruct the user to select the Options tab and then to click View Log. After the user has opened the log file, instruct the user to save the file and send it to you.

    • If logging was not enabled, instruct the user to turn on logging, try the connection, and then send the log file. To enable logging, instruct the user to click Properties on the Connection Manager logon screen. Instruct the user to select the Options tab and to select the Enable Logging check box.

    • If the user is attempting to log on to Windows using a Connection Manager profile, the View Log button will be unavailable. To find the log file, instruct the user to log on to the computer without using the Connection Manager profile.

      • If the user is running Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, or Windows 2000:

        1. After the user has logged on, instruct the user to click Start, point to Search, and then click For Files or Folders.

        2. After the Search Results dialog box appears, instruct the user to click Search Options, select the Advanced Options check box and to select the Search system folders check box.

        3. Instruct the user to search for the log file by typing in the first three letters of the connection profile name, followed by an asterisk (*) and the log file extension (.log). For example, if the connection profile is named Awesome, the user should search for Awe*.log. The file is stored in %windir%\temp by default.

      • If the user is running Windows Vista or a later version of Windows:

        • After the user has logged on, instruct the user to click Start, and then in the Start Search text box type the first three letters of the connection profile name, followed by an asterisk (*) and the log file extension (.log). For example, if the connection profile is named Awesome, the user should search for Awe*.log. The file is stored in %windir%\temp by default.

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