Event ID 335 — Windows Media Wrapper Playlist Delivery

Updated: August 14, 2009

Applies To: Windows Server 2008 R2

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Wrapper playlists are a special type of playlist that you can use to implement bumper advertisements on your publishing points. Wrapper playlists enable you to append content to the beginning and end of a unicast stream. You can easily use wrapper playlists to customize a stream with your own branding and message without having to change the content from the content creator. Additionally, wrapper playlists help ensure that users who connect to broadcast publishing points always receive certain content, such as a sponsor identification, disclaimer, or advertisement, regardless of when they connected to the broadcast. For more information, see About wrapper playlists.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 335
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.6
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_CANNOT_OPEN_WRAPPER_PLAYLIST
Message: The wrapper playlist file '%1' on publishing point '%2' cannot be opened.

Resolve

Specify Network Service account permissions for the wrapper playlist

Make sure that the wrapper playlist is not opened by another program, such as Windows Media Wrapper Playlist Editor. If the file is not being used by another program, specify Network Service account permissions for the wrapper playlist directory.

Windows Media Services uses the Network Service account to access digital media content and playlists that are stored in %systemdrive%\WMPub and its subdirectories. By default, the Network Service account has Read permissions to the WMPub directory and its subdirectories.

If the specified wrapper playlist does not reside in %systemdrive%\WMPub or in one of its subdirectories, you must specify Read permissions on the alternate playlist source for the Network Service account.

To perform this procedure, you must have membership in the local Administrators group, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority.

To specify Network Service account permissions for wrapper playlists:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the publishing point that is sourcing from the wrapper playlist file.
  3. In the details pane, click the Advertising tab.
  4. In Wrapper advertisements, in Wrapper location, note the path of the wrapper playlist (for example, C:\WMA\wrapper.wsx).
  5. In Windows Explorer, right-click the folder that contains the wrapper playlist, and then click Properties.
  6. On the Security tab, click Edit.
  7. In the Permissions for <Object name> dialog box, click Add.
  8. In the Select Users, Computers, or Groups dialog box, in Enter the object names to select, type Network Service, and then click OK.
  9. In the Permissions for <Object name> dialog box, in the Group or user names area, click NETWORK SERVICE.
  10. In the Permissions for NETWORK SERVICE area, click the Allow check box for the following permissions: Read.
  11. Click OK to save the changes.

Verify

To verify that the wrapper playlist can be delivered to clients, test the stream by using Windows Media Player:

  1. If you want to test the stream by using Windows Media Player on the computer that is running Windows Media Services, you must install Desktop Experience. For more information, see Installing Desktop Experience.
  2. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  3. In the console tree, click the publishing point that hosts the stream you want to test.
  4. In the details pane, click the Announce tab, and then, in Connect to a unicast stream, note the value of the URL that a client can use to access the content.
  5. Start Windows Media Player on a computer that can access the stream, and enter the URL that you noted in the previous step.
  6. Using the Player controls, test the control functionality of the content stream. Broadcast streams can use the Start and Stop commands. On-demand streams can use the Start, Stop, and Pause commands, and the Seek bar.

Note: If some members of your expected audience will access the stream from outside your network firewall, your testing scenario should include that condition. For more information about the firewall configuration for Windows Media Services, see Firewall Information for Windows Media Services.

Related Management Information

Windows Media Wrapper Playlist Delivery

Streaming Media Services

Community Additions

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