Publishing Point Details Page

Updated: November 7, 2011

Applies To: Windows 7, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Vista

Use the Publishing Point Details feature page to view summary information about the live Smooth Streams that are received by a publishing point, details about the tracks within all of the live streams, and stream origin and destination information.

noteNote
The Publishing Point Details page is only available in IIS Media Services 4.

The Stream Summary pane displays summary information about the live Smooth Streams that are received from all live sources (such as encoders or other Live Smooth Streaming publishing points) by the selected publishing point. This section displays the total number of streams that are being received and their overall status, such as the number of streams that are started, stopped, and so on. It also displays summary information about the tracks within all of the presentations that are received, such as the track type (for example, audio or video) and their encoded bit rates.

The Track Details pane displays the following details about the tracks within all of the live streams that are received by the publishing point. The track details are updated every two seconds.

  • Encoded Bit Rate. The encoded bit-rate setting of the track, as configured on the encoder, in kilobits per second (Kbps). The value might differ slightly from the actual encoded bit rate.

  • Incoming Bit Rate. The incoming bit rate of the track, in Kbps. This is the rate at which the live source is sending the track data to the publishing point. The value will vary slightly from the encoded bit rate value due to network conditions.

  • Request Rate. The number of client requests every second for fragments from the track.

  • Fragment Timestamp. The timestamp of the last fragment that was received for the track. The timestamp value is a fragment-level metadata value and is measured in timescale units of the encoder, typically 100-nanosecond (ns) increments. The encoder creates the timestamp in each fragment header.

  • Fragment Duration. The duration of the last fragment that was received for the track. The duration is measured in timescale units of the encoder.

  • Type. The track type, which is usually audio or video. It can also be a custom track type created by an encoder, such as a textstream type.

  • Stream Name. The name of the incoming Smooth Stream that contains the track. The stream name is created by the encoder.

  • Stream State. The current status of the Smooth Stream that contains the track (either started or stopped).

noteNote
You can sort the list of track details by clicking a column heading. For example, to group all of the track details for a particular stream in the list, click Stream Name.

The Connection Details pane maps incoming streams to their live sources in a Sources hierarchical list. It also maps outgoing streams to their destinations in a Destinations hierarchical list. The connection details are updated every two seconds.

The Sources list displays information about the sources that are sending live streams to the publishing point and how the live stream data is sent. To view this information, do the following:

  1. Expand the Sources root node. Each of the additional nodes that are displayed is the domain name and/or IP address of a live source.

  2. Expand a node for a live source to reveal the stream's input type to the publishing point. The stream input type can be one of the following:

    • HTTP Push. The live streams are being posted to the publishing point from the live source.

    • HTTP Pull. The publishing point is getting the live streams by requesting them from the live source.

  3. Expand a node for an input type to display the names of the streams that the publishing point is receiving from the live source.

The Destinations list displays information about how the publishing point is delivering live streams to clients and the type of output. To view this information, do the following:

  1. Expand the Destinations root node. Each of the additional nodes can be one of the following:

    • The domain name and/or IP address of the local Live Smooth Streaming server. In this case, the publishing point is configured to deliver fragments from incoming live streams to clients, such as a Silverlight player or an Apple® mobile digital device. It might also be configured to distribute the incoming live stream to another publishing point on the local server.

    • The domain name and/or IP address of a remote Live Smooth Streaming server. In this case, the publishing point is configured to distribute the incoming live stream to a publishing point on another Live Smooth Streaming server.

  2. Expand a node for a destination to reveal the stream output type from the publishing point to the destination. The stream output type can be any or all of the following, depending on the publishing point configuration:

    • IIS Smooth Streaming. The publishing point is returning MPEG-4 (MP4) fragments from incoming live streams to Silverlight-based clients that request them.

    • Apple HTTP Live Streaming. The publishing point is converting MP4 fragments in incoming live streams to MPEG-2 Transport Stream (MPEG-2 TS) segments and delivering the segments to Apple mobile digital devices that request them.

      noteNote
      For more information about how to configure a publishing point to deliver live streams to Apple devices, including iPhone® and iPad® devices, see the Mobile Devices section in Add/Edit Publishing Point Dialog Box.

    • HTTP Push. The publishing point is pushing the incoming live streams to another publishing point, either on the local server or on a remote Live Smooth Streaming server.

    • HTTP Pull. Another publishing point, either on the local server or on a remote Live Smooth Streaming server, is pulling the incoming live streams from this publishing point.

  3. Expand a node for an output type to display the names of the streams that the publishing point is delivering to clients.

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