Remove-Job

Updated: August 9, 2015

Remove-Job

Deletes a Windows PowerShell background job.

Aliases

The following abbreviations are aliases for this cmdlet: 

  • rjb

Syntax

Parameter Set: SessionIdParameterSet
Remove-Job [-Id] <Int32[]> [-Force] [-Confirm] [-WhatIf] [ <CommonParameters>]

Parameter Set: CommandParameterSet
Remove-Job [-Command <String[]> ] [-Confirm] [-WhatIf] [ <CommonParameters>]

Parameter Set: FilterParameterSet
Remove-Job [-Filter] <Hashtable> [-Force] [-Confirm] [-WhatIf] [ <CommonParameters>]

Parameter Set: InstanceIdParameterSet
Remove-Job [-InstanceId] <Guid[]> [-Force] [-Confirm] [-WhatIf] [ <CommonParameters>]

Parameter Set: JobParameterSet
Remove-Job [-Job] <Job[]> [-Force] [-Confirm] [-WhatIf] [ <CommonParameters>]

Parameter Set: NameParameterSet
Remove-Job [-Name] <String[]> [-Force] [-Confirm] [-WhatIf] [ <CommonParameters>]

Parameter Set: StateParameterSet
Remove-Job [-State] <JobState> {NotStarted | Running | Completed | Failed | Stopped | Blocked | Suspended | Disconnected | Suspending | Stopping | AtBreakpoint} [-Confirm] [-WhatIf] [ <CommonParameters>]




Detailed Description

The Remove-Job cmdlet deletes Windows PowerShell background jobs. You can start jobs by using the Start-Job or the AsJob parameter of any cmdlet.

You can use this cmdlet to delete all jobs or delete jobs based on their name, ID, instance ID, command, or state, or by passing a job object to Remove-Job. Without parameters or parameter values, Remove-Job has no effect.

Starting in Windows PowerShell 3.0, you can use the Remove-Job cmdlet to delete custom job types, such as scheduled jobs and workflow jobs. If you use Remove-Job to delete a scheduled job, it deletes the scheduled job and deletes all instances of the scheduled job on disk. This includes the results of all triggered job instances.

Before deleting a running job, use the Stop-Job cmdlet to stop the job. If you try to delete a running job, the command fails. You can use the Force parameter of Remove-Job to delete a running job.

If you do not delete a background job, the job remains in the global job cache until you close the session in which the job was created.

Parameters

-Command<String[]>

Specifies an array of words that appear in commands. This cmdlet deletes jobs that include the specified words.


Aliases

none

Required?

false

Position?

named

Default Value

None

Accept Pipeline Input?

True (ByPropertyName)

Accept Wildcard Characters?

false

-Filter<Hashtable>

Specifies a hash table of conditions. This cmdlet deletes jobs that satisfy all of the conditions. Enter a hash table where the keys are job properties and the values are job property values.

This parameter works only on custom job types, such as workflow jobs and scheduled jobs. It does not work on standard background jobs, such as those created by using the Start-Job cmdlet. For information about support for this parameter, see the help topic for the job type.

This parameter was introduced in Windows PowerShell 3.0.


Aliases

none

Required?

true

Position?

1

Default Value

none

Accept Pipeline Input?

True (ByPropertyName)

Accept Wildcard Characters?

false

-Force

Indicates that this cmdlet deletes a job even if the status is Running. By default, this cmdlet does not delete running jobs.


Aliases

F

Required?

false

Position?

named

Default Value

none

Accept Pipeline Input?

false

Accept Wildcard Characters?

false

-Id<Int32[]>

Specifies an array of IDs of background jobs that this cmdlet deletes.

The ID is an integer that uniquely identifies the job in the current session. It is easier to remember and type than the instance ID, but it is unique only in the current session. You can type one or more IDs, separated by commas. To find the ID of a job, type Get-Job.


Aliases

none

Required?

true

Position?

1

Default Value

None

Accept Pipeline Input?

True (ByPropertyName)

Accept Wildcard Characters?

false

-InstanceId<Guid[]>

Specifies an array of instance IDs of jobs that this cmdlet deletes.

An instance ID is a GUID that uniquely identifies the job on the computer. To find the instance ID of a job, use the Get-Job cmdlet or display the job object.


Aliases

none

Required?

true

Position?

1

Default Value

none

Accept Pipeline Input?

True (ByPropertyName)

Accept Wildcard Characters?

false

-Job<Job[]>

Specifies the jobs to be deleted. Enter a variable that contains the jobs or a command that gets the jobs. You can also use a pipeline operator to submit jobs to this cmdlet.


Aliases

none

Required?

true

Position?

1

Default Value

None

Accept Pipeline Input?

True (ByValue, ByPropertyName)

Accept Wildcard Characters?

false

-Name<String[]>

Specifies an array of friendly names of jobs that this cmdlet deletes. Wildcard characters are permitted.

Because the friendly name is not guaranteed to be unique, even in the session, use the WhatIf and Confirm parameters when you delete jobs by name.


Aliases

none

Required?

true

Position?

1

Default Value

None

Accept Pipeline Input?

True (ByPropertyName)

Accept Wildcard Characters?

false

-State<JobState>

Specifies the state of jobs to delete. The acceptable values for this parameter are:

-- NotStarted
-- Running
-- Completed
-- Failed
-- Stopped
-- Blocked
-- Disconnected
-- Suspending
-- Stopping
-- Suspended

To delete jobs with a state of Running, use the Force parameter.


Aliases

none

Required?

true

Position?

1

Default Value

None

Accept Pipeline Input?

True (ByPropertyName)

Accept Wildcard Characters?

false

-Confirm

Prompts you for confirmation before running the cmdlet.


Required?

false

Position?

named

Default Value

false

Accept Pipeline Input?

false

Accept Wildcard Characters?

false

-WhatIf

Shows what would happen if the cmdlet runs. The cmdlet is not run.


Required?

false

Position?

named

Default Value

false

Accept Pipeline Input?

false

Accept Wildcard Characters?

false

<CommonParameters>

This cmdlet supports the common parameters: -Debug, -ErrorAction, -ErrorVariable, -InformationAction, -InformationVariable, -OutVariable, -OutBuffer, -PipelineVariable, -Verbose, -WarningAction, and -WarningVariable. For more information, see    about_CommonParameters.

Inputs

The input type is the type of the objects that you can pipe to the cmdlet.

  • System.Management.Automation.Job

    You can pipe a job object to this cmdlet.


Outputs

The output type is the type of the objects that the cmdlet emits.

  • None

    This cmdlet does not generate any output.


Examples

Example 1: Delete a job by using its name

This example deletes a background job named BatchJob from the current session. The first command uses the Get-Job cmdlet to get an object that represents the job, and then it saves the job in the $batch variable.

The second command uses a pipeline operator (|) to send the job to the Remove-Job cmdlet.

This command is equivalent to using the Job parameter of Remove-Job, for example, Remove-Job -Job $batch.


PS C:\> $batch = Get-Job -Name "BatchJob"
PS C:\> $batch | Remove-Job

Example 2: Delete all jobs in a session

This command deletes all of the jobs in the current session.


PS C:\> Get-Job | Remove-Job

Example 3: Delete NotStarted jobs

This command deletes all jobs from the current session that have not yet been started.


PS C:\> Remove-Job -State NotStarted

Example 4: Delete jobs by using a friendly name

This command deletes all jobs that have friendly names that end with batch from the current session. These include jobs that are running.

The command uses the Name parameter of Remove-Job to specify a job name pattern, and it uses the Force parameter to make sure that all jobs are removed, even those that might be in progress.


PS C:\> Remove-Job -Name *batch -Force

Example 5: Delete a job that was created by Invoke-Command

This example shows how to use the Remove-Job cmdlet to remove a job that was started on a remote computer by using the AsJob parameter of the Invoke-Command cmdlet.

The first command uses the Invoke-Command cmdlet to run a job on the Server01 computer. It uses the AsJob parameter to run the command as a background job, and it saves the resulting job object in the $j variable.

Because the command used the AsJob parameter, the job object is created on the local computer, even though the job runs on a remote computer. As a result, you use local commands to manage the job.

The second command uses the Remove-Job cmdlet to remove the job. It uses a pipeline operator (|) to send the job in $j to Remove-Job. This is a local command. A remote command is not required to remove a job that was started by using the AsJob parameter.


PS C:\> $j = Invoke-Command -ComputerName Server01 -ScriptBlock {Get-Process} -AsJob
PS C:\> $j | Remove-Job

Example 6: Delete a job that was created by Invoke-Command and Start-Job

This example shows how to remove a job that was started by using Invoke-Command to run a Start-Job command. In this case, the job object is created on the remote computer and you use remote commands to manage the job.


 

The first command uses the New-PSSession cmdlet to create a PSSession, which is a persistent connection, to the Server01 computer. A persistent connection is required when you run Start-Job remotely. The command stores the PSSession in the $s variable.


PS C:\> $s = New-PSSession -ComputerName Server01

 

The second command uses the Invoke-Command cmdlet to run a Start-Job command in the PSSession in $s. The job runs a Get-Process command. It uses the Name parameter of Start-Job to specify a friendly name for the job.


PS C:\> Invoke-Command -Session $s -ScriptBlock {Start-Job -ScriptBlock {Get-Process} -Name MyJob}

 

The third command uses the Invoke-Command cmdlet to run a Remove-Job command in the PSSession in $s. The command uses the Name parameter to identify the job to delete.


PS C:\> Invoke-Command -Session $s -ScriptBlock {Remove-Job -Name MyJob}

Example 7: Delete a job by using its instance ID

This example shows how to remove a job based on its instance ID.


 

The first command uses Start-Job to start a background job. The command saves the resulting job object in the $j variable.


PS C:\> $j = Start-Job -ScriptBlock {Get-Process Powershell}

 

The second command uses a pipeline operator (|) to send the job object in $j to the Format-List cmdlet. The Format-List command uses the Property parameter with a value of * (all) to display all of the properties of the job object in a list.

The job object display shows the values of the ID and InstanceID properties, together with the other properties of the object.


PS C:\> $j | Format-List -Property *

 

The third command uses a Remove-Job command to remove the job from the current session. To generate the command, you can copy and paste the InstanceID value from the object display.

To copy a value in the Windows PowerShell console, use the mouse to select the value, and then press Enter to copy it. To paste a value, right-click.


PS C:\> Remove-Job -InstanceID dce2ee73-f8c9-483e-bdd7-a549d8687eed

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