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Configuring Applications for Azure Rights Management

 

Updated: July 1, 2015

Applies To: Azure Rights Management, Office 365

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This information is for IT administrators and consultants who have deployed Azure Rights Management. If you are looking for user help and information about how to use Rights Management for a specific application or how to open a file that is rights-protected, use the help and guidance that accompanies your application.

For example, for Office applications, click the Help icon and enter search terms such as Rights Management or IRM. For the RMS sharing application for Windows, see the Rights Management sharing application user guide.

After you have deployed Azure Rights Management (RMS) for your organization, use the following information to configure applications and services to support Azure RMS. These include Office applications such as Word and Outlook, and services such as Exchange and SharePoint. For information about how they support RMS, see How Applications Support Azure Rights Management.

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For information about supported versions and other requirements, see Requirements for Azure Rights Management.

To configure on-premises servers such as Exchange Server and SharePoint Server, see Deploying the Azure Rights Management Connector.

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For high-level examples and screenshots of applications configured to use Azure RMS, see the Azure RMS in action: What administrators and users see section from the What is Azure Rights Management? topic.

Because Office 365 natively supports Azure RMS, no client computer configuration is required to support the information rights management (IRM) features for applications such as Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook and the Outlook Web App. All users have to do is sign in to their Office applications with their Microsoft Office 365 credentials and they can protect files and emails, and use files and emails that have been protected by others.

However, we recommend that you supplement these applications with the Rights Management sharing application, so that users get the benefit of the Office add-in. For more information, see the Rights Management sharing application: Installation and configuration for clients section in this topic.

To configure Exchange Online to support Azure RMS, you must configure the information rights management (IRM) service for Exchange Online. To do this, you use Windows PowerShell (no need to install a separate module), and run commands for Exchange Online PowerShell.

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You cannot currently configure Exchange Online to support Azure RMS if you are using a customer-managed tenant key (BYOK) for Azure RMS, rather than the default configuration of a Microsoft-managed tenant key. For more information, see the BYOK pricing and restrictions section in the Planning and Implementing Your Azure Rights Management Tenant Key topic.

If you try to configure Exchange Online when Azure RMS is using BYOK, the command to import the key (step 5, in the following procedure) fails with the error message [FailureCategory=Cmdlet-FailedToGetTrustedPublishingDomainFromRmsOnlineException].

For detailed instructions to configure Exchange Online to enable IRM functionality, see the documentation in the Exchange library. For example:

However, the following steps provide a typical set of commands that you would run to enable Exchange Online to use Azure RMS:

  1. If this is the first time that you have used Windows PowerShell for Exchange Online on your computer, you must configure Windows PowerShell to run signed scripts. Start your Windows PowerShell session by using the Run as administrator option, and then type:

    
    Set-ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned 
    
  2. In your Windows PowerShell session, sign in to Exchange Online by using an account that is enabled for remote Shell access. By default, all accounts that are created in Exchange Online are enabled for remote Shell access but this can be disabled (and enabled) by using the Set-User <UserIdentity> -RemotePowerShellEnabled command.

    To sign in, type:

    $Cred = Get-Credential
    

    In the Windows PowerShell credential request dialog box, supply your Office 365 user name and password.

  3. Connect to the Exchange Online service by running the following two commands:

    $Session = New-PSSession -ConfigurationName Microsoft.Exchange -ConnectionUri https://ps.outlook.com/powershell/ -Credential $Cred -Authentication Basic –AllowRedirection
    
    Import-PSSession $Session
    
  4. Specify the location of the Azure RMS tenant key, according to your region:

    For North America (and government subscriptions):

    Set-IRMConfiguration -RMSOnlineKeySharingLocation "https://sp-rms.na.aadrm.com/TenantManagement/ServicePartner.svc"
    

    For Europe:

    Set-IRMConfiguration -RMSOnlineKeySharingLocation "https://sp-rms.eu.aadrm.com/TenantManagement/ServicePartner.svc"
    

    For Asia:

    Set-IRMConfiguration -RMSOnlineKeySharingLocation "https://sp-rms.ap.aadrm.com/TenantManagement/ServicePartner.svc"
    

    For South America:

    Set-IRMConfiguration -RMSOnlineKeySharingLocation "https://sp-rms.sa.aadrm.com/TenantManagement/ServicePartner.svc"
    
  5. Import configuration data from Azure RMS to Exchange Online, in the form of the trusted publishing domain (TPD). This includes the Azure RMS tenant key and Azure RMS templates:

    Import-RMSTrustedPublishingDomain -RMSOnline -name "RMS Online"
    

    In this command, we used the name of RMS Online for the base name of the TPD for Azure RMS in Exchange Online. After the TPD is imported, it is named RMS Online -1 in Exchange Online.

  6. Enable Azure RMS functionality so that IRM features are available for Exchange Online:

    Set-IRMConfiguration -InternalLicensingEnabled $true
    
  7. Optionally, test that this configuration is successful by using the following command:

    Test-IRMConfiguration -Sender <user email address>
    

    For example: Test-IRMConfiguration -Sender adams@contoso.com

    This command runs a series of checks that includes verifying connectivity to the service, retrieving the configuration, retrieving URIs, licenses, and any templates. In the Windows PowerShell session, you will see the results of each and at the end, if everything passes these checks: OVERALL RESULT: PASS 

  8. Disconnect your remote PowerShell session:

    Remove-PSSession $Session
    

Users can now protect their email messages by using Azure RMS. For example, in the Outlook Web App, select Set permissions from the extended menu (...), and then choose Do Not Forward or one of the available templates to apply information protection to the email message and any attachments. However, because the Outlook Web App caches the UI for a day, wait for this time period to elapse before you try applying information protection to email messages and after running these configuration commands. Before the UI updates to reflect the new configuration, you will not see any options from the Set permissions menu.

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If you create new custom templates for Azure RMS or update the templates, each time, you must run the following Exchange Online PowerShell command (if necessary, run steps 2 and 3 first) to synchronize these changes to Exchange Online: Import-RMSTrustedPublishingDomain -Name "RMS Online -1" -RefreshTemplates –RMSOnline

As an Exchange administrator, you can now configure features that apply information protection automatically, such as transport rules and data loss prevention (DLP) policies.

For Office 365 Message Encryption:

  • Run the same steps as documented in this section, but if you don't want templates to be displayed, before step 6, run the following command to prevent IRM templates from being available in the Outlook Web App and Outlook client: Set-IRMConfiguration -ClientAccessServerEnabled $false

To configure SharePoint Online and OneDrive for Business to support Azure RMS, you must first enable the information rights management (IRM) service for SharePoint Online by using the SharePoint admin center. Then, site owners can IRM-protect their SharePoint lists and document libraries, and users can IRM-protect their OneDrive for Business library so that documents that are saved there, and shared with others, are automatically protected by Azure RMS.

To enable the information rights management (IRM) service for SharePoint Online, see the following instructions from the Office website:

This configuration is done by the Office 365 administrator.

After you have enabled the IRM service for SharePoint, site owners can IRM-protect their SharePoint document libraries and lists. For instructions, see the following from the Office website:

This configuration is done by the SharePoint site administrator.

After you have enabled the IRM service for SharePoint Online, users can then apply Rights Management protection to their own OneDrive for Business document library.

This configuration is done by each user:

  1. In OneDrive, click the Settings icon, to open the Settings menu, and then click Site Contents.

  2. Hover on the Documents tile, chose the ellipses (...), and then click SETTINGS.

  3. On the Settings page, in the Permissions and Management section, click Information Rights Management.

  4. On the Information Rights Management Settings page, select Restrict permissions on this library on download check box, specify your choice of name and a description for the permissions, and optionally, click SHOW OPTIONS to configure optional configurations, and then click OK.

    For more information about the configuration options, see the instructions in Apply Information Rights Management to a list or library from the Office documentation.

Because users rather than an administrator must IRM-protect their OneDrive for Business library, educate users about the benefits of protecting their files and how to do this. For example, explain that when they share a document from OneDrive for Business, only people they authorize can access it with any restrictions that they configure, even if the file is renamed and copied somewhere else.

Because Office 2013 natively supports Azure RMS, no client computer configuration is required to support the information rights management (IRM) features for applications such as Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook and the Outlook Web App. All users have to do is sign in to their Office applications with their Microsoft Office 365 credentials and they can protect files and emails, and use files and emails that have been protected by others.

However, we recommend that you supplement these applications with the Rights Management sharing application, so that users get the benefit of the Office add-in. For more information, see the Rights Management sharing application: Installation and configuration for clients section in this topic.

For client computers to use Azure RMS with Office 2010, they must have installed the Rights Management sharing application for Windows. No further configuration is required other than users must sign in with their Microsoft Office 365 credentials and they can then protect files and use files that have been protected by others.

For more information about the Rights Management sharing application, see the Rights Management sharing application: Installation and configuration for clients section in this topic.

The Rights Management (RMS) sharing application is required for client computers to use Azure RMS with Office 2010, and recommended for all computers and mobile devices that support Azure RMS. The RMS sharing application integrates with Office applications by installing an Office add-in so that users can easily protect files and emails directly from the ribbon. It also offers generic protection for files types that are not natively supported by Azure RMS, and a document tracking site for users to track and revoke files that they have protected.

To install and configure the RMS sharing application for Windows for an enterprise deployment, see the Rights Management sharing application administrator guide.

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If you want to quickly install and test the RMS sharing application for a single computer, see Download and install the Rights Management sharing application from the Rights Management sharing application user guide.

To install the RMS sharing application for mobile platforms, you can download the relevant app by using the links on the Microsoft Rights Management page. No configuration is required to use Azure RMS with this app.

This category includes line-of-business applications that are written in-house by using the RMS SDK, and applications from software vendors that are written by using the RMS SDK. For these applications, follow the instructions that are provided with the application.

After you’ve configured your applications to support Azure Rights Management, use the Azure Rights Management Deployment Roadmap to check whether there are other configuration steps that you might want to do before you roll out Azure Rights Management to users and administrators. If not, see Using Azure Rights Management for your next steps.

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