ExistingConnection Event Class

 

Applies To: SQL Server 2016

The ExistingConnection event class indicates the properties of existing user connections when the trace was started. The server raises one ExistingConnection event per existing user connection.

Data column nameData typeDescriptionColumn IDFilterable
ApplicationNamenvarcharName of the client application that created the connection to an instance of SQL Server. This column is populated with the values passed by the application rather than the displayed name of the program.10Yes
BinaryDataimageBinary dump of option flags such as session level settings, including ANSI nulls, ANSI padding, cursor close on commit, null concatenation, and quoted identifiers.2Yes
ClientProcessIDintID assigned by the host computer to the process where the client application is running. This data column is populated if the client provides the client process ID.9Yes
DatabaseIDintThe current database ID of the user connection. ID of the database specified by the USE database statement or the default database if no USE database statement has been issued for a given instance. Determine the value for a database by using the DB_ID function.3Yes
DatabaseNamenvarcharName of the database in which the user statement is running.35Yes
EventClassintType of event = 17.27No
EventSequenceintThe sequence of this event within this trace.51No
GroupIDintID of the workload group where the SQL Trace event fires.66Yes
HostNamenvarcharName of the computer on which the client is running. This data column is populated if the client provides the host name. To determine the host name, use the HOST_NAME function.8Yes
IntegerDataintThe network packet size in use for the connection.25Yes
IsSystemintIndicates whether the event occurred on a system process or a user process. 1 = system, NULL = user. Always NULL for this event.60Yes
LoginNamenvarcharName of the login of the user (either SQL Server security login or the Microsoft Windows login credentials in the form of DOMAIN\username).11Yes
LoginSidimageSecurity identifier (SID) of the logged-in user. You can find this information in the sys.server_principals catalog view. Each SID is unique for each login in the server.41Yes
NTDomainNamenvarcharWindows domain to which the user belongs.7Yes
NTUserNamenvarcharWindows user name.6Yes
RequestIDintThe ID of the request containing the statement.49Yes
ServerNamenvarcharName of the instance of SQL Server being traced.26No
SessionLoginNamenvarcharLogin name of the user who originated the session. For example, if you connect to SQL Server using Login1 and execute a statement as Login2, SessionLoginName shows Login1 and LoginName shows Login2. This column displays both SQL Server and Windows logins.64Yes
SPIDintID of the session on which the event occurred.12Yes
StartTimedatetimeTime at which the user opened this connection (login time).14Yes
TextDatantextSet options specific to the connection.1Yes

sp_trace_setevent (Transact-SQL)
Audit Login Event Class

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