Mark Russinovich: TechNet Magazine Articles
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  • Special Coverage: Windows Server 2008: Inside Windows Server 2008 Kernel Changes
    Dive in to our detailed tour of key changes in the Windows Server 2008 kernel that improve reliability, performance, and scalability. Find out how Windows Server 2008 makes better use of thread pools, streamlines recovery from hardware failures, improves virtualization with Hyper-V, and more.
    Mark Russinovich - March 2008
  • Security: Inside Windows Vista User Account Control
    User Account Control, or UAC, is one of the most misunderstood new features in Windows Vista. But its goal—to enable users to run with standard user rights—can solve many security issues. Get an inside look at the problems UAC is designed to address and see exactly how this new feature works.
    Mark Russinovich - June 2007
  • Windows Administration: Inside the Windows Vista Kernel: Part 3
    In this issue, we wrap up our in-depth discussion about what’s new in the Windows Vista kernel. In this final installment, we look at changes and new features pertaining to reliability, recovery, and security.
    Mark Russinovich - April 2007
  • Windows Administration: Inside the Windows Vista Kernel: Part 2
    This month we continue our in-depth discussion about what’s new in the Windows Vista kernel. In this issue, we review some advancements in how Windows Vista manages memory and explore the areas of system startup, shutdown, and power management.
    Mark Russinovich - March 2007
  • Windows Administration: Inside the Windows Vista Kernel: Part 1
    With Windows Vista, changes to the OS kernel bring about advances in many areas, ranging from memory management to reliability to security. We kick off this series with a look at how the kernel delivers improvements in the areas of processes, threads, and I/O.
    Mark Russinovich - February 2007
  • User Account Control: Inside Windows 7 User Account Control
    User Account Control is a set of technologies that has one overall goal: to make it possible for users to run as standard users. In this article, Mark Russinovich explains how the default Windows 7 UAC mode makes a PA user’s experience smoother by reducing prompts, allows them to control what legitimate software can modify their system, and still enables more software to run without administrative rights and continues to shift the software ecosystem to write software that works with standard user rights.
    Mark Russinovich - July 2009
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