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Microsoft Security Bulletin MS07-018 - Critical

Vulnerabilities in Microsoft Content Management Server Could Allow Remote Code Execution (925939)

Published: April 10, 2007 | Updated: June 12, 2007

Version: 2.0

Summary

Who Should Read this Document: Customers who use Microsoft Content Management Server

Impact of Vulnerability: Remote Code Execution

Maximum Severity Rating: Critical

Recommendation: Customers should apply the update immediately

Security Update Replacement: None

Caveats: Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 924429 documents the currently known issues that customers may experience when they install this security update. The article also documents recommended solutions for these issues. For more information, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 924429.

Tested Software and Security Update Download Locations:

Affected Software:

The software in this list has been tested to determine whether the versions are affected. Other versions either no longer include security update support or may not be affected. To determine the support life cycle for your product and version, visit the Microsoft Support Lifecycle Web site.

General Information

Executive Summary:

This update resolves two newly discovered, privately reported vulnerabilities. Each vulnerability is documented in the "Vulnerability Details" section of this bulletin.

We recommend that customers apply the update immediately.

Severity Ratings and Vulnerability Identifiers:

Vulnerability IdentifiersImpact of VulnerabilityMicrosoft Content Management Server 2001 Service Pack 1Microsoft Content Management Server 2002 Service Pack 2
CMS Memory Corruption Vulnerability - CVE-2007-0938Remote Code ExecutionCriticalCritical
CMS Cross-Site Scripting and Spoofing Vulnerability - CVE-2007-0939Information Disclosure and SpoofingImportantImportant
Aggregate Severity of All Vulnerabilities Critical Critical

This assessment is based on the types of systems that are affected by the vulnerability, their typical deployment patterns, and the effect that exploiting the vulnerability would have on them.

Why did Microsoft reissue this bulletin on June 12, 2007?
This bulletin has been re-released to address the issues identified in Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 924429 . The security update previously did not account for installations of CMS 2002 made to a location other than the default path location. Customer who have installed the original version of the security update still need to follow the guidance in Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 924429 to regain normal functionality.

What updates does this release replace?
This update does not replace any previous security update. If you are running Content Management Server 2001, we recommend that you install MS03-002 before installing this update.

Can I use the Microsoft Baseline Security Analyzer (MBSA) to determine whether this update is required?
The following table provides the MBSA detection summary for this security update.

ProductMBSA 1.2.1MBSA 2.0.1
Microsoft Content Management Server 2001 Service Pack 1YesNo
Microsoft Content Management Server 2002 Service Pack 2YesYes

Note MBSA 1.2.1 uses an integrated version of the Office Detection Tool (ODT) which does not support remote scans of this security update. For more information about MBSA, visit the MBSA Web site.

For more information about MBSA, visit the MBSA Web site. For more information about the programs that Microsoft Update and MBSA 2.0.1 currently do not detect, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 895660.

For more detailed information, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 910723: Summary list of monthly detection and deployment guidance articles.

Can I use Systems Management Server (SMS) to determine whether this update is required?
The following table provides the SMS detection summary for this security update.

ProductSMS 2.0SMS 2003
Microsoft Content Management Server 2001 Service Pack 1YesNo
Microsoft Content Management Server 2002 Service Pack 2YesYes

SMS 2.0 and SMS 2003 Software Update Services (SUS) Feature Pack can use MBSA 1.2.1 for detection and therefore have the same limitation that is listed earlier in this bulletin related to programs that MBSA 1.2.1 does not detect.

For SMS 2.0, the SMS SUS Feature Pack, which includes the Security Update Inventory Tool (SUIT), can be used by SMS to detect security updates. SMS SUIT uses the MBSA 1.2.1 engine for detection. For more information about SUIT, visit the following Microsoft Web site. For more information about the limitations of SUIT, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 306460. The SMS SUS Feature Pack also includes the Microsoft Office Inventory Tool to detect required updates for Microsoft Office applications.

For SMS 2003, the SMS 2003 Inventory Tool for Microsoft Updates (ITMU) can be used by SMS to detect security updates that are offered by Microsoft Update and that are supported by Windows Server Update Services. For more information about the SMS 2003 ITMU, visit the following Microsoft Web site. SMS 2003 can also use the Microsoft Office Inventory Tool to detect required updates for Microsoft Office applications.

For more information about SMS, visit the SMS Web site.

For more detailed information, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 910723: Summary list of monthly detection and deployment guidance articles.

CMS Memory Corruption Vulnerability - CVE-2007-0938:

A remote code execution vulnerability exists in Content Management Server because of the way that it handles a specially crafted HTTP request.

An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could take complete control of an affected system. An attacker could then install programs; view, change, or delete data; or create new accounts with full user rights.

Mitigating Factors for CMS Memory Corruption Vulnerability - CVE-2007-0938:

  • On Microsoft Internet Information Service 6.0, the W3WP.exe worker process by default is a low-privilege process running as the built-in Network Service account.
    Note – This only applies to Content Management Server 2002.
  • Customers who have configured Microsoft Content Management Server (MCMS) Web sites in their own application pools to isolate them from other Web sites could limit the impact of an attack.

Workarounds for CMS Memory Corruption Vulnerability - CVE-2007-0938:

We have not identified any workarounds for this vulnerability.

FAQ for CMS Memory Corruption Vulnerability - CVE-2007-0938:

What is the scope of the vulnerability? 
A remote code execution vulnerability exists in Content Management Server because of the way that it handles a specially crafted HTTP request. An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could remotely take complete control of an affected system. An attacker could then install programs; view, change, or delete data; or create new accounts with full user rights.

What causes the vulnerability? 
A remote code execution vulnerability results from the way that the Microsoft Content Management Server handles unexpected characters in an HTTP request.

What is Microsoft Content Management Server? 
Microsoft Content Management Server (MCMS) enables customers to build, deploy, and maintain Web sites. Using MCMS, customers can create, publish and manage Web content, as well as managing the server resources that are available to the site.

I am running Microsoft Content Management Server 2001 and have customized the ManualLogin.asp file, is there anything I need to do? 
This security update does not update ManualLogin.asp. Any customizations done to this page will therefore remain after this update has been applied. We do still recommend that customized ASP pages are backed up before doing maintenance on any Web site.

What might an attacker use the vulnerability to do? 
An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could take complete control of the affected system.

How could an attacker exploit the vulnerability? 
An attacker could try to exploit the vulnerability by constructing a specially crafted URL and sending an HTTP GET request to a CMS system.

What systems are primarily at risk from the vulnerability? 
Web sites that are maintained using an affected versions of Microsoft Content Management Server.

What does the update do? 
The update removes the vulnerability by modifying the way that Content Management Server validates an HTTP request.

When this security bulletin was issued, had this vulnerability been publicly disclosed? 
No. Microsoft received information about this vulnerability through responsible disclosure. Microsoft had not received any information to indicate that this vulnerability had been publicly disclosed when this security bulletin was originally issued.

When this security bulletin was issued, had Microsoft received any reports that this vulnerability was being exploited? 
No. Microsoft had not received any information to indicate that this vulnerability had been publicly used to attack customers and had not seen any examples of proof of concept code published when this security bulletin was originally issued.

Cross-site Scripting and Spoofing Vulnerability in CMS Vulnerability - CVE-2007-0939:

A cross-site scripting and spoofing vulnerability exists in Microsoft Content Management Server (MCMS) which could allow an attacker to convince a user to run a malicious script. If this malicious script is run, it would execute in the security context of the user. Attempts to exploit this vulnerability require user interaction. This vulnerability could allow an attacker access to any data on the affected systems that was accessible to the individual user.

It may also be possible for an attacker to exploit this vulnerability to modify Web browser caches and intermediate proxy server caches, and put spoofed content in those caches.

Mitigating Factors for Cross-site Scripting and Spoofing Vulnerability in CMS Vulnerability - CVE-2007-0939:

  • The vulnerability could not be exploited automatically through e-mail. For an attack to be successful, a user must click a Web link that is sent in an e-mail message.
  • An attack would only be successful if the user that was convinced to click on the attacker’s specially crafted URL had access to the CMS Web server.
  • An attacker who successfully exploited the cross-site scripting aspect of this vulnerability would gain only the same permissions as the user.
  • Clients who have turned on the Do not save encrypted pages to disk advanced Internet option in Internet Explorer would not be at risk from any attempts to put spoofed content into the client cache if they accessed their Web site through the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocol.
  • Clients who use SSL-protected connections to access the affected Web sites would not be vulnerable to attempts to put spoofed content on intermediate proxy server caches. This is because SSL session data is encrypted and is not cached on intermediate proxy servers.
  • If spoofed content is successfully put in an intermediate proxy server’s cache, it could be difficult for an attacker to predict which users would be served the spoofed cached content.

Workarounds for Cross-site Scripting and Spoofing Vulnerability in CMS Vulnerability - CVE-2007-0939:

Microsoft has tested the following workaround. Although these workaround will not correct the underlying vulnerability, they help block known attack vectors. When a workaround reduces functionality, it is identified in the following section.

  • Setting an MCMS site to Yes-Read Only will disable content authoring and access to that MCMS server entry point from Site Manager

    Setting an MCMS site to Yes-Read Only will disable content authoring and access to that MCMS server entry point from Site Manager, but doesn’t remove any files from the file system. If you want to use the Site Manager tool to modify settings on a read-only MCMS site, you must first make the site read-write in the Web Server Configuration tool.
    Setting an MCMS site to read-only means that you can’t use the client-side SDAPI (or Site Manager) to deploy content. On a read-only site, you must use the server-side SDAPI for content deployment API unless you have a separate read-write Web entry point.

    To modify the MCMS site to Yes-Read Only, follow these steps:

    1. Click Start, click Programs, and then select Microsoft Content Management Server.
    2. Click Server Configuration Application.
    3. Click the Web tab and then select Configure.
    4. In the dialog box for the MCMS Web site you wish to configure, select Yes – Read Only.
    5. Click OK to save the changes.

    Impact of Workaround: Users will no longer be able to author content via MCMS Web Author (you cannot login with edit rights on an MCMS Server) nor via Site Manager.

FAQ for Cross-site Scripting and Spoofing Vulnerability in Microsoft Content Management Server Vulnerability - CVE-2007-0939:

What is the scope of the vulnerability? 
A cross-site scripting and spoofing vulnerability exists in Microsoft Content Management Server (MCMS). The vulnerability could allow the injection of a client-side script in the user's browser. In a Web-based attack scenario a compromised Web site could accept or host user-provided content or advertisements which could contain specially crafted content that could exploit this vulnerability.

The script could take any action on the user's behalf that the Web site is authorized to take. This could include monitoring the Web session and forwarding information to a third party, running other code on the user's system, and reading or writing cookies.

What causes the vulnerability? 
The cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability is caused by the Microsoft Content Management Server not completely validating input that is provided in a HTML redirection query before it sends this input to the browser.

What is Microsoft Content Management Server? 
Microsoft Content Management Server (MCMS) enables customers to build, deploy, and maintain Web sites. Using MCMS, customers can create, publish and manage Web content, as well as managing the server resources that are available to the site.

What is cross-site scripting? 
Cross-site scripting (XSS) is a class of security vulnerability that can enable an attacker to "inject" script code into a user's session with a Web site. The vulnerability can affect Web servers that dynamically generate HTML pages. If these servers embed browser input in the dynamic pages that they send back to the browser, these servers can be manipulated to include maliciously supplied content in the dynamic pages. This can allow malicious script to be executed. Web browsers may perpetuate this problem through their assumptions of "trusted" sites and their use of cookies to maintain persistent state with the Web sites that they frequent. An XSS attack does not modify Web site content. Instead, it inserts new, malicious script that can execute at the browser in the context that is associated with a trusted server.

How does cross-site scripting work? 
Web pages contain text and HTML markup. Text and HTML markup are generated by the server and are interpreted by the client. If untrusted content is introduced into a dynamic page, neither the server nor the client has sufficient information to recognize that this injection has occurred and to take protective measures.

I am running Microsoft Content Management Server 2001 and have customized the ManualLogin.asp file, is there anything I need to do? 
This security update does not update ManualLogin.asp. Any customizations done to this page will therefore remain after this update has been applied. We do still recommend that customized ASP pages are backed up before doing maintenance on any Web site.

What might an attacker use the vulnerability to do?
An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could inject a client side script in the user's browser. The script could spoof content, disclose information, or take any action that the user could take on the affected Web site. Attempts to exploit this vulnerability would require user interaction. It may also be possible to exploit the vulnerability to manipulate Web browser caches and intermediate proxy server caches, and put spoofed content in those caches.

How could an attacker exploit the vulnerability? 
In an e-mail attack scenario an attacker could exploit the vulnerability by sending a specially crafted e-mail message to a user of a server that is running an affected software application. The attacker could then convince the user to click a link in the e-mail message.

In a Web-based attack scenario a compromised Web an attacker could inject a client side script in the user's browser. The script could spoof content, disclose information, or take any action that the user could take on the affected Web site. Attempts to exploit this vulnerability would require user interaction.

It may also be possible to exploit the vulnerability to modify Web browser caches and intermediate proxy server caches and to put spoofed content in those caches.

What systems are primarily at risk from the vulnerability? 
Web sites that are maintained using an affected versions of Microsoft Content Management Server.

Could the vulnerability be exploited over the Internet? 
Yes. An attacker could try to exploit this vulnerability over the Internet. An attacker would need to know the full name of the CMS server being targeted for an attack.

What does the update do? 
The update removes the vulnerability by modifying the way that Content Management Server validates HTTP redirection queries.

When this security bulletin was issued, had this vulnerability been publicly disclosed? 
No. Microsoft received information about this vulnerability through responsible disclosure. Microsoft had not received any information to indicate that this vulnerability had been publicly disclosed when this security bulletin was originally issued. This security bulletin addresses the privately disclosed vulnerability as well as additional issues discovered through internal investigations.

When this security bulletin was issued, had Microsoft received any reports that this vulnerability was being exploited? 
No. Microsoft had not received any information to indicate that this vulnerability had been publicly used to attack customers and had not seen any examples of proof of concept code published when this security bulletin was originally issued.

Affected Software:

For information about the specific security update for your affected software, see the appropriate section:

Content Management Server

Prerequisites and Additional Update Details

Important: Before you install this update, make sure that the following requirements have been met:

Inclusion in Future Service Packs

There are no planned future Service Packs for Content Management Server 2001 or Content Management Server 2002, Service Pack 2 is the last Service Pack.

Restart Requirement

To help reduce the chance that a restart will be required, stop all affected services and close all applications that may use the affected files prior to installing the security update. For more information about the reasons why you may be prompted to restart your computer, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 887012.

Removal Information

After you install the update, you cannot remove it. To revert to an installation before the update was installed; you must remove the application, and then install it again from the original CD-ROM.

Automated Installation Information

Microsoft Update Web Site

This update will be available through the Microsoft Update Web site. Microsoft Update consolidates updates that are provided by Windows Update and Office Update into one location and lets you choose automatic delivery and installation of high-priority and security updates. We recommend that you install this update by using the Microsoft Update Web site. The Microsoft Update Web site detects your particular installation and prompts you to install exactly what you must have to make sure that your installation is completely up to date.

To have the Microsoft Update Web site detect the required updates that you must install on your computer, visit the Microsoft Update Web site. You will be given the choice of Express (Recommended) or Custom. After detection is complete, you will receive a list of recommended updates for your approval. Click Install Updates or Review and Install Updates to complete the process.

Installation Information

If you installed your application from a server location, the server administrator must update the server location with the administrative update and deploy that update to your computer.

Installation Information

The following setup switches are relevant to administrative installations as they allow an administrator to customize how the files are extracted from within the security update.

The security update supports the following setup switches for Content Management Server 2001 Service Pack 1:

Supported Security Update Installation Switches
SwitchDescription
/q Specifies quiet mode, or suppresses prompts, when files are being extracted.

The security update supports the following setup switches for Content Management Server 2002 Service Pack 1:

Supported Security Update Installation Switches
SwitchDescription
/q Specifies quiet mode, or suppresses prompts, when files are being extracted.
/q:u Specifies user-quiet mode, which presents some dialog boxes to the user.
/q:a Specifies administrator-quiet mode, which does not present any dialog boxes to the user.
/t:path Specifies the target folder for extracting files.
/c Extracts the files without installing them. If /t:path is not specified, you are prompted for a target folder.
/c:path Overrides the install command that is defined by author. Specifies the path and name of the Setup.inf or .exe file.
/r:n Never restarts the computer after installation.
/r:I Prompts the user to restart the computer if a restart is required, except when used with /q:a.
/r:a Always restarts the computer after installation.
/r:s Restarts the computer after installation without prompting the user.
/n:v No version checking - Install the program over any earlier version.

Note These switches do not necessarily work with all updates. If a switch is not available, that functionality is required for the correct installation of the update. Also, using the /n:v switch is unsupported and may result in an unbootable system. If the installation is unsuccessful, you should contact your support professional to understand why it could not install.

For more information about the supported setup switches, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 197147.

Deployment Information

  1. Download this security update for Content Management Server 2001 Service Pack 1 or Content Management Server 2002 Service Pack 2.
  2. Click Save this program to disk, and then click OK.
  3. Click Save.
  4. Using Windows Explorer, find the folder that contains the saved file, and then double-click the saved file.
  5. If you are prompted to install the update, click Yes.
  6. Click Yes to accept the License Agreement.
  7. Insert your original source CD-ROM when you are prompted to do so, and then click OK.
  8. When you receive a message that states the installation was successful, click OK.

Installation File Information

The English version of this update has the file attributes that are listed in the following table. The dates and times for these files are listed in coordinated universal time (UTC). When you view the file information, it is converted to local time. To find the difference between UTC and local time, use the Time Zone tab in the Date and Time tool in Control Panel.

Content Management Server 2001 Service Pack 1:

File NameVersionDateTimeSize
Aesecurityclient.dll4.10.1157.009-Nov-200600:30124,704
Aesecurityservice.exe4.10.1157.009-Nov-200600:30154,400
Aeserverobject.dll4.10.1157.009-Nov-200600:301,157,400
Ncaspextensions.dll4.10.1157.009-Nov-200600:30117,536
Nrmsgres.dll4.10.1157.009-Nov-200600:30160,016
Reauthfilt.dll4.10.1157.009-Nov-200600:3050,448
Resolutionobjectmodel.dll4.10.1157.009-Nov-200600:301,133,352
Serverconfigurationapi.dll4.10.1157.009-Nov-200600:30641,320

Content Management Server 2002 Service Pack 2:

File NameVersionDateTimeSize
Activexediting.vbs30-Jan-200720:4717,857
Aejavaproxy.dll5.0.4484.024-Oct-200310:331,994,752
Aeserverobject.dll5.0.5317.030-Jan-200721:141,193,472
Authformclientie.js30-Jan-200720:477,422
Cms2002.xml26-Feb-200721:397,972
Console.js30-Jan-200720:479,501
Emitterthineditie_activex.inc30-Jan-200723:0524,371
Hlink.js30-Jan-200720:475,204
Microsoft.contentmanagement.common.dll5.0.5317.030-Jan-200721:1357,344
Microsoft.contentmanagement.developertools.visualstudio.dll5.0.5317.030-Jan-200721:17126,976
Microsoft.contentmanagement.webauthor.dll5.0.5317.030-Jan-200721:15397,312
Microsoft.contentmanagement.webcontrols.dll5.0.5317.030-Jan-200721:15204,800
Ncaspextensions.dll5.0.5317.030-Jan-200721:13164,864
Ncbmprdr.dll5.0.5317.030-Jan-200721:13149,504
Nrdcapplication.exe5.0.0.531730-Jan-200721:182,240,608
Nrdhtml.cab30-Jan-200721:30233,743
Nrsitedeployclient.dll5.0.5317.030-Jan-200721:15588,800
Nrsitedeployserver.dll5.0.5317.030-Jan-200721:152,051,072
Resolutionobjectmodel.dll5.0.5317.030-Jan-200721:141,485,312

Verifying that the Update Has Been Applied

  • Microsoft Baseline Security Analyzer

    To verify that a security update has been applied to an affected system, you may be able to use the Microsoft Baseline Security Analyzer (MBSA) tool. See the frequently asked question, “Can I use the Microsoft Baseline Security Analyzer (MBSA) to determine whether this update is required?” in the section, Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) Related to This Security Update, earlier in this bulletin.

  • File Version Verification

    Note Because there are several versions of Microsoft Windows, the following steps may be different on your computer. If they are, see your product documentation to complete these steps.

    1. Click Start, and then click Search.
    2. In the Search Results pane, click All files and folders under Search Companion.
    3. In the All or part of the file name box, type a file name from the appropriate file information table, and then click Search.
    4. In the list of files, right-click a file name from the appropriate file information table, and then click Properties.

      Note Depending on the version of the operating system or programs installed, some of the files that are listed in the file information table may not be installed.
    5. On the Version tab, determine the version of the file that is installed on your computer by comparing it to the version that is documented in the appropriate file information table.

      Note Attributes other than the file version may change during installation. Comparing other file attributes to the information in the file information table is not a supported method of verifying that the update has been applied. Also, in certain cases, files may be renamed during installation. If the file or version information is not present, use one of the other available methods to verify update installation.

Other Information

Acknowledgments

Microsoft thanks the following for working with us to help protect customers:

  • Martyn Tovey of Netcraft for reporting the Cross-site Scripting and Spoofing Vulnerability in Microsoft Content Management Service Vulnerability – (CVE-2007-0939)

Obtaining Other Security Updates:

Updates for other security issues are available at the following locations:

Support:

  • Customers in the U.S. and Canada can receive technical support from Microsoft Product Support Services at 1-866-PCSAFETY. There is no charge for support calls that are associated with security updates.
  • International customers can receive support from their local Microsoft subsidiaries. There is no charge for support that is associated with security updates. For more information about how to contact Microsoft for support issues, visit the International Support Web site.

Security Resources:

Software Update Services:

By using Microsoft Software Update Services (SUS), administrators can quickly and reliably deploy the latest critical updates and security updates to Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003-based servers, and to desktop systems that are running Windows 2000 Professional or Windows XP Professional.

For more information about how to deploy security updates by using Software Update Services, visit the Software Update Services Web site.

Windows Server Update Services:

By using Windows Server Update Services (WSUS), administrators can quickly and reliably deploy the latest critical updates and security updates for Windows 2000 operating systems and later, Office XP and later, Exchange Server 2003, and SQL Server 2000 onto Windows 2000 and later operating systems.

For more information about how to deploy security updates using Windows Server Update Services, visit the Windows Server Update Services Web site.

Systems Management Server:

Microsoft Systems Management Server (SMS) delivers a highly configurable enterprise solution for managing updates. By using SMS, administrators can identify Windows-based systems that require security updates and can perform controlled deployment of these updates throughout the enterprise with minimal disruption to end users. For more information about how administrators can use SMS 2003 to deploy security updates, visit the SMS 2003 Security Patch Management Web site. SMS 2.0 users can also use Software Updates Service Feature Pack to help deploy security updates. For information about SMS, visit the SMS Web site.

Note SMS uses the Microsoft Baseline Security Analyzer, the Microsoft Office Detection Tool, and the Enterprise Update Scan Tool to provide broad support for security bulletin update detection and deployment. Some software updates may not be detected by these tools. Administrators can use the inventory capabilities of the SMS in these cases to target updates to specific systems. For more information about this procedure, visit the following Web site. Some security updates require administrative rights following a restart of the system. Administrators can use the Elevated Rights Deployment Tool (available in the SMS 2003 Administration Feature Pack and in the SMS 2.0 Administration Feature Pack) to install these updates.

Disclaimer:

The information provided in the Microsoft Knowledge Base is provided "as is" without warranty of any kind. Microsoft disclaims all warranties, either express or implied, including the warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. In no event shall Microsoft Corporation or its suppliers be liable for any damages whatsoever including direct, indirect, incidental, consequential, loss of business profits or special damages, even if Microsoft Corporation or its suppliers have been advised of the possibility of such damages. Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of liability for consequential or incidental damages so the foregoing limitation may not apply.

Revisions:

  • V1.0 (April 10, 2007): Bulletin published.
  • V1.1 (May 1, 2007): Bulletin updated. Caveats identified in Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 924429 that documents the currently known issues that customers may experience when they install this security update.
  • V2.0 (June 12, 2007): Bulletin updated: This bulletin has been re-released to address the issues identified in Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 924429.

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