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Globally deploying multiple farms

Office 2007

Updated: April 23, 2009

Applies To: Office SharePoint Server 2007

Updated: 2009-04-23

Many organizations support employees working in multiple sites either within a region or around the world. Microsoft currently supports three different deployment configurations to accommodate geographically dispersed sites with Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 and Windows SharePoint Services 3.0. This planning content includes the following articles:

Additionally, the following poster-size models, created in Microsoft Office Visio, provide overviews of several of the planning topics. If you do not have Visio installed, you can download a free viewer (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=73526&clcid=0x409). A plotter works best for printing these files.

This planning content does not attempt to address all of the variables that might affect the deployment of Office SharePoint Server 2007 across multiple geographic sites. The Office SharePoint Server 2007 and Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 teams at Microsoft welcome your requests for additional content or testing related to this topic. Send feedback and requests to O12ITdx@microsoft.com, or add comments to the TechNet version of this content online.

Recommended knowledge

The material presented in this content requires an understanding of Office SharePoint Server 2007, including the following:

  • Office SharePoint Server 2007 features, including indexing, search, My Sites, profiles, and alerts

  • Capacity planning for Office SharePoint Server 2007 and Windows SharePoint Services 3.0

  • Administration of Office SharePoint Server 2007 and Windows SharePoint Services 3.0

For more information about these topics, see Planning and architecture for Office SharePoint Server 2007.

Terminology

This content uses terminology that can mean different things for different organizations. To ensure consistency for the reading audience, the following terms are defined.

Term Definition

Central site

The location that hosts the majority of corporate data and/or employee computers connected by using a local area network (LAN). Corporate servers at the central site are typically contained within a data center.

Regional site

A location that hosts a subset of corporate data and/or employee computers connected together by using a combination of LAN and WAN links. A regional site is connected to a central corporate site by using a WAN link.

For purposes of this paper, a regional site can be one of the following:

  • A site located in a different region or country.

  • A site separated by insufficient network links (even if the site is within reasonable proximity to the central site).

  • A site physically separated from the central site but otherwise well-connected (such as a government agency or branch office).

Local user

A user that connects to a central site by using a LAN.

Regional user

A user that works primarily at a regional site and connects to a central site by using a WAN.

LAN (Local Area Network)

A short-distance network connection between computers. Typically, a LAN connects computers within a single location with bandwidth of at least 10 MB.

WAN (Wide Area Network)

A long-distance network connection between computers. Typically a WAN connects computers across multiple geographic locations with a bandwidth of less than 45 MB.

Data center

The physical location of corporate servers, data, and applications.

Latency

The time required for a packet to travel from one point on a network to another. The recommendations and test results included in this guidance are based on latency that is measured one way, not round-trip. Latency can influence planning for geographic deployments in which data travels across WAN links that span multiple cities, states, provinces, countries, or continents.

When measuring the latency that affects users, use the Ping tool (ping.exe) to measure latency from the client computer to the Web server on the server farm. Divide the round-trip result by two. When measuring the latency between two data centers that host servers of the same farm, use the Ping tool to measure latency from a Web server in the remote data center to the database server in the primary data center. Divide the round-trip result by two.

Download this book

This topic is included in the following downloadable book for easier reading and printing:

See the full list of available books at Downloadable content for Office SharePoint Server 2007.

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